All posts by Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

Alexander is a Ph.D. student in Computer Science. He currently holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Applied Math. He has experience working for industry major companies performing research in the fields of machine learning, data mining and natural language processing. In his free time, Alexander enjoys hiking, Nordic skiing and traveling.

U.S. economic growth: gross output

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

Gross output represents the market value of all services and goods produced in a nation’s economy. This value differs slightly from gross domestic product (GDP), which is often used to measure the economic performance of a country. Gross output consists of products sold to final consumers (the GDP) as well as products sold to other industries where it is used as material or input. Today we will explore historical data (provided by the Bureau of Economic Analysis) on the gross output of the U.S. economy.

Continue reading U.S. economic growth: gross output

Connected cars

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

A connected car is a car equipped with internet access and occasionally connected to a local wireless network as well. This allows the car to communicate with other devices, both inside and outside the car, to provide the driver and passengers with additional functions. Typically, a connected car offers entertainment, navigation, safety and diagnostic capabilities. The concept of a connected car is related to technologies such as self-driving cars and the internet of things.

Continue reading Connected cars

Age distribution among same-sex couples

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In this post, we will continue to investigate same-sex couples and their demographic features. We will once again use American Community survey data, namely the ACS 2015 five-year sample processed by the IPUMS project. In this version, IPUMS USA has introduced a specially-constructed variable to their version of American Community Survey. Using answers to different questions of the survey form, they attempt to pinpoint the location of the respondent’s potential spouse in the same household. This allows us to identify both same- and opposite-sex couples.

Continue reading Age distribution among same-sex couples

Same-sex couples across the U.S.

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

Following our post about marriage in same-sex couples, we will explore this topic a bit more. It has only been a bit over two years since June 26, 2015, when same-sex marriage became legal in all U.S. states. Many couples may not have registered their relationship yet. It is also not uncommon for opposite-sex couples to live together without registering their marriage. To aid in identifying such relationships, IPUMS USA introduced a specially-constructed variable to their version of the American Community Survey. Using answers from different questions of the survey form, they attempt to pinpoint the respondent’s potential spouse in the same household.

Continue reading Same-sex couples across the U.S.

Same-sex married couples in the U.S.

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

On June 26, 2015, The United States Supreme Court ruled in the famous Obergefell v. Hodges case that state-level bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional.

This decision effectively made same-sex marriage legal in all U.S. states and Washington, D.C., as well as all U.S. territories except for American Samoa, but not on all Indian lands. Prior to the decision, many states already recognized same-sex relationships but were not obligated to recognize marriages registered in other jurisdictions.

The American Community Survey began providing data on same-sex married couples in 2013. This data, however, is limited to the householder and his or her spouse. In today’s post, we will explore the ACS data from the Census Bureau spanning years 2013-2015, focusing on same-sex married couples.

Continue reading Same-sex married couples in the U.S.

Are business industries sensitive to climate?

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

The geographic properties of an area often dictate the type of businesses that can be located there. For example, you can’t have an inland naval base. Farms and agriculture in general are less likely to prosper on rocky mountains that on sunny plains. But today with all the technological advancements we have, many jobs in intellectual labor, including IT and finance, hi-tech manufacturing and other new industries seem less likely to depend on climatic features.

Continue reading Are business industries sensitive to climate?

Time use across the nation

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In this post, we will combine data from the American Time Use survey and Current Population survey to see how time use patterns change with geographic location. We used 11 years of ATUS data (2003-2014) and the corresponding CPS data about the respondent’s state of residence. The American Time Use survey classifies daily activities into 431 detailed categories. For this post, we selected only those having a participation rate of at least 30 percent in each state. The top activities were sleeping, washing and dressing, food preparation, work, eating and watching television.

Continue reading Time use across the nation

Same-occupation couples: new estimates

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In this post, we will revisit the topic of occupation and marriage dependency, and same-occupation couples in particular. Recently, new five-year American Community Survey data was released by IPUMS USA. This is the most comprehensive version of the survey, having the widest coverage of the population (even in smaller areas).

Continue reading Same-occupation couples: new estimates

Commodities flow in U.S. industry

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

The United States Bureau of Economic Analysis provides a lot of quantitative information on the country’s economic activities. The Bureau’s Industry Economic Program prepares one interesting type of data: commodity input-output tables. These tables show how industries interact to provide input to and take output from one another.

Continue reading Commodities flow in U.S. industry