All posts by Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science Alexander is a Ph.D. student in Computer Science. He currently holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Applied Math. He has experience working for industry major companies performing research in the fields of machine learning, data mining and natural language processing. In his free time, Alexander enjoys hiking, Nordic skiing and traveling.

Occupational standing of different demographics

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

The Num-Powers-Boyd score measures occupational status based on median education levels and median incomes of individuals. An intuitive interpretation of the score of an occupation is the percentage of the population having an occupation with education and income levels below that occupation. This score weights education and income contribution equally. Although the use of such indices is still a topic of discussion among professional sociologists, this simple and clear interpretation can be understood by everyone.

In a previous post, we used this measure to examine occupation rankings through time. Today we will look at the scores of different demographic groups. This time we also used data provided by the Minnesota Population Center and IPUMS.

Continue reading Occupational standing of different demographics

Occupational standing through time

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

One’s occupation is often associated with a certain level or group in society. This “general standing” or prestige of an occupation is often studied by sociologists. There is a significant debate about whether it can be broken down to individual characteristics like expected salary and education level or training to perform the job or if it requires an analysis of much more complex characteristics.

Continue reading Occupational standing through time

Taxes in different states

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In a previous post, we explored effective income tax rates. However, federal tax is not the only income-related burden on American citizens. Many states impose their own income tax upon their residents. Usually, they use the same bracket-based progressive taxation principle.

The Tax Foundation prepared a combined overview of state income tax brackets, and we organized it here into an interactive map. You can enter total income and specify filing status and number of dependents. You can also choose to map the dollar tax amount or effective tax rate (tax amount as a percentage of income). Please note that these numbers are only approximations of the actual tax since there are many specific details in tax calculation for some of the states that we left behind (e.g. age-based calculations, veteran status, disability and health status, among others). For this map, we only considered wage income.

Continue reading Taxes in different states

What is your effective tax rate?

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

The United States uses a progressive income tax structure, which means that the more you earn, the higher tax rate you pay. The tax system was designed this way following the assumption that wealthier people can afford to pay more, while those struggling to afford basic necessities should be relieved and given a lower tax rate. This scheme is pretty straightforward, however, the actual relationship between your income and effective tax rate is a bit more complicated.

Continue reading What is your effective tax rate?

Young adults living with parents: Education

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

As we have seen previously, the number of young adults living with parents has been steadily increasing in the past decades. In this post, we will examine how this trend relates to education. As before, we used IPUMS to get ACS data for multiple years and restricted our scope to people 18 to 34 years old.

Continue reading Young adults living with parents: Education

Young adults living with parents: Employment

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

As we have previously seen, the number of young adults living with their parents has been steadily increasing in the past decades.

In this post, we will explore their employment, income and occupation. Again, we used IPUMS to get ACS data for multiple years. As before, we restricted our scope to people 18 to 34 years old.

Continue reading Young adults living with parents: Employment

Rise of personal income in the U.S.

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

Personal income in the U.S. has been constantly rising in recent years — personal income per capita increased by 3.5 percent in 2015, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. We used this data, along with CPI data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, to calculate inflation-adjusted personal income changes for different areas. The dollar amounts in this post correspond to 2016 dollars.

Continue reading Rise of personal income in the U.S.

Relocations: Will you leave NYC for California?

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In this post, we analyze migration data provided by the IRS.  In an earlier post, we explored the nationwide characteristics of relocation. This time we focus on a lower level and study which states are the most popular relocation destinations for people across the U.S.

From the following map, we can see that most people relocate locally, usually to the neighboring states. The obvious exceptions are Alaska and Hawaii, but even for these states, the distribution of out-migrants is non-uniform.

Continue reading Relocations: Will you leave NYC for California?

Relocation patterns: recovery after recession?

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

Every year, millions of people in the U.S. relocate for various reasons: a job offer, family circumstances or simply striving for a change of scenery. To study relocation patterns we analyzed migration data provided by IRS. The data is based on taxpayers’ reports and is provided at the county and state level. In this post, we will focus on migration between states.

Continue reading Relocation patterns: recovery after recession?

Generations through time: Immigration

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

Throughout history, the U.S. has been seen as a place of tremendous opportunity and progress. Many people took the challenge to pursue a new life in this country, and many of them stayed. However, western society has not stayed the same — each generation was influenced by different economic and social events. In this post, we will explore how migration patterns changed with each new generation.

Continue reading Generations through time: Immigration