All posts by Pavel Prikhodko

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning Pavel has worked for many years as a researcher and developer on a wide range of applications (varying from mechanics and manufacturing to social data, finance and advertising), building predictive systems and trying to find stories that data can tell. In his free time, he enjoys being with his family.

Internetification today

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

Nowadays, technology and people are so strongly connected that you can hardly imagine life without it. The Internet became an important instrument for everyone and for everything, whether it is studying, working, entertainment or more. The number of computer users in the world, and America in particular, is growing at a quick rate, so let’s figure out who they actually are.

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A few numbers about alcohol consumption

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

The average American citizen drinks about 8.6 liters of spirits per year. In 2013, 70 percent of adults reported that they drank alcohol in the past year and 56 percent reported that they drank in the past month. About 87 percent of adults said that they drank alcohol during their lifetime. The bitter flip side of alcohol consumption is alcoholism.

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Poverty problem in the USA

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

The issue of poverty is a hot topic in almost every country of the world, and America is not an exception. According to Census data, the official poverty rate in the U.S. was 14.5 percent in 2013. The year before, more than 45 million people were living in poverty; this number was not significantly different in 2011. The number of children under 18 living in poverty fell to 19.9 percent in 2013 from 21.8 percent in 2012.

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Donald Trump against the News media: who tells the truth?

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

You can like or dislike Donald Trump, but it’s hard not to talk about him. A survey on whether President Trump or the news media can be more trusted to tell the truth about important issues in the United States revealed some interesting results (the survey was conducted in February 2017). According to the survey, about 37 percent of the respondents said that they trust newly-elected President Trump to tell the truth about important issues more than the media. The largest share of respondents (52 percent) stated that they trust the news media more, while only 10 percent were unsure about the answer or didn’t answer at all.

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What war veterans do after retirement

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

War is one of the scariest things that humans have ever produced. People who survived wars are trying hard to find themselves and live an ordinary life after experiencing the atrocities of war. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 21.2 million veterans in the U.S. in 2015. The largest number of the U.S. veterans are those who served in the Vietnam War, while the largest number of female veterans served during Post 9/11. The total number of people who served during World War II, Vietnam and the Korean War was 9.4 million. More than 95 percent of these veterans are men averaging at least 55 years of age.

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Gun crime statistics in the U.S.

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

Gun violence is one of the most widely-discussed topics in American society. Gun-related accidents and crimes take place literally every day. Shocking statistics of deaths and injuries as a result of gun violence can’t be missed. According to Gunviolencearchive.org, 51,700 incidents occurred in 2014 in the United States. More than 12,000 people were killed and 23,000 injured in accidents involving firearms. Perhaps the most terrible fact is that 628 children were killed or injured as a result of gun accidents last year.

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Dynamics of home-based working in the US

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

Working from home is becoming more and more popular in the U.S. The number of people who prefer to use their own dwelling as a workplace increased slightly in the recent years. People who work 9 to 5 may start asking questions like, “who actually are home-based workers?” and “why don’t they fancy a typical job in the office?” There are main types of such workers: home workers, who work exclusively from home, home-based workers, who work from home partly or all the time, and mixed workers, who work both from home and from the office.

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Fake news and stories on social media

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

As we saw in a previous article about digital news, there are many sources for the news today, including public social media. But are they actually true? According to a survey conducted by BuzzFeed in 2017, about 5 percent of respondents in the United States always trusted the news they saw on social media. The largest share of the respondents (31 percent) said that they trusted news on social media about half the time, while 28 percent of the respondents stated that they rarely trusted news on social media. Interestingly, 17 percent of respondents almost never trusted the news they saw on social media. Around 10 percent of people trusted news on social media most of the time.

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Hard market: consumption and production of cement

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

Cement is one of the key building materials in the world, both in the residential and nonresidential sector. This material is also used for the production of concrete. Thus, more than 70 percent of cement sales in the United States went to producers of ready-mixed concrete, and about 12 percent of sales went to concrete product manufacturers. According to information published at Statista.com, around 4,100 million metric tons of cement were produced globally in 2015. The U.S. accounted for about 83.4 million metric tons of this production. The year before, 4,180 million metric tons of material were produced worldwide, and 83.2 million metric tons were produced in the U.S. In 2013, these numbers were smaller: 4,080 million metric tons globally and about 77.4 million metric tons in the U.S.

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