Singles in the U.S.

April R. McDowell

April R. McDowell, Ph.D. Family Science

People often speculate over the availability of single adults across the U.S. and if there are particular cities that may be better than others in terms of the odds of finding a mate. Without looking at real data, one can only make guesses about this. Thus, the purpose of this article is to shed some more light on this topic and provide some actual data upon which some conclusions may be drawn. It is important to note that the data presented and conclusions drawn here are geared toward heterosexual men and women (i.e., single adults looking for a mate of the opposite sex).

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Innovation, Creativity and Why the U.S. Needs to Become More Attractive for Immigrants

Daniel Vargas Gómez

Daniel Vargas Gómez, Ph.D. Philosophy and Media

We live in an age where technology drives innovation in an unprecedented manner. Whether we are talking about gadgets we cannot do without (smartphones, tablets, and game consoles) or specialized software (Indesign, Photoshop or CAD) or even medical innovations (nanotechnology, genetic research and prosthetics), technology seems to always function as a common thread between any of these conversations. The growing availability and access to technologies is the reason why gadgets, machines, and robots have become omnipresent tools that make our lives easier and our working hours more productive. A tool, however, does not work on its own. In fact, it is how we use the tools what in the end generates a crucial difference. Technology, when in creative hands, can be conducive to wonderful innovations, from solar powered cars to video conference calls at the touch of a button. Where does this creative talent come from? Is it something that we can take for granted or is it perhaps more of a black swan event within a workforce that actually lacks the ability to use the many tools at its disposal?

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Finished basements are becoming more popular, especially in large houses

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

According to the U.S. Census Bureau Survey of Construction, the number of new houses with basements is declining across the U.S., down by almost a quarter from 40 percent of new homes in 2000 to 32 percent in 2013. Surprisingly, not only did the relative number of finished basements rise, there has also been an increase in absolute percentage: nine percent of all new homes in the U.S. as of now have a finished basement.

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Gender Inequality Today

Kristine Barseghyan

Kristine Barseghyan, Ph.D. (ABD) Social Sciences

In 2013, the advocates of gender equality celebrated two important anniversaries – 50 years of the Equal Pay Act and of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique that marked the beginning of the second-wave feminism in the United States in 1960s. After 50 years of revolutionary changes, achievements in gender equality leave us with mixed feelings. As our brief statistical overview will show later, women have come a long way: today more women are working, fewer getting married.

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