Daytime population change across U.S. counties

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In this post we will again analyze the ACS survey data on population to explore daytime population change during working hours. Like the Census’s own publications on Commuting (Journey to Work), we will continue with estimating the absolute change in population. We will use this data together with more modern versions of the ACS to see what has changed.

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How people get to work

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Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

People who live in the U.S. use different modes of transport to get to work. According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 86 percent of people used automobiles, 5 percent used public transport and 0.1 percent used taxicabs in 2012. Less than 1 percent of Americans choose bicycles for transport. Some people (0.2 percent) used their motorcycles to get to work. About 3 percent of workers preferred to walk. We can be sure that most Americans prefer go to work using their automobiles. The development of transportation networks like roads, transit lines and others played an important role in the design of the communities.

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Employment residence ratio across U.S. counties

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In this post we will analyze ACS survey data on population to explore daytime population change during working hours. A good starting point for this kind of study is the Census’s own publication on Commuting (Journey to Work). We will use this data together with a more modern versions of ACS.

Continue reading Employment residence ratio across U.S. counties