Innovation in wireless communication

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

Just how important is wireless communication? In 2016, the word appeared in over 30 percent of all patents in the “Multiplex Communication” category.

According to a Cisco VNI White Paper, the company expects annual global internet traffic to increase threefold over the next five years. They also expect the traffic in the U.S. to grow slightly more slowly, at a compound annual growth rate of 19 percent.

The white paper also predicts especially rapid growth in busy-hour traffic as well as smartphone traffic. There’s little doubt that we are in the need of faster communication technologies. Especially important are technologies for wireless communications.

Let’s take a look at the current state of innovation in the industry.

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Top furniture stores in the United States

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

Ikea is the the global leader in the furniture market, and the United States is no exception. The invasion began when the Swedish furniture-selling powerhouse landed on American soil in 1985. Since then Ikea has become the top-ranked specialty furniture store in the country. In 2013, the Swedish retailer’s sales amounted to about $2.7 billion in the U.S., up from $2.5 billion in 2012. The American company Williams-Sonoma took second place with sales of approximately $2.2 billion in 2013.

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Fed Policy and its Effect on MSAs

R.T. Young

R.T. Young, Ph.D. Business Economics

The Federal Reserve (the “Fed”) is rife with criticism of its policy missteps.  From the “inflation fighter” Paul Volker in the late 70s and early 80s to the “kept interest rates too low for too long” Alan Greenspan, many Fed observers see the mistakes of the U.S. central bank as an indication that the Fed is too limited in foresight to provide reliable policy guidance.

Presuming Fed managers actually do lack much foresight, as the argument goes, then why allow the Fed’s “money bureaucrats” to manipulate financial asset prices?

Among the effects of manipulated financial prices, observers of the Fed point to the distributional effects of the institution’s policies.

What’s implied by distributional effects?

In a nutshell, Fed policy hurts some in order to benefit others.

Of the many distributional effects, one of the most commonly mentioned is the benefits to owners of stocks versus the reduced income to holders of bonds and other interest-bearing securities.

This article looks at what interest income has done by state since the Fed began lowering interest rates in August 2007.

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Nightlife in America: bars, taverns and clubs

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

The American bar, tavern and nightclub industry generated $24.35 billion in income in 2015. It grows slightly each year; in comparison, the revenue of the industry was only $19.14 billion in 2003. By the end of 2016, the industry’s revenue will be approximately $25 billion according to a forecast published on Statista.com. In 2017 the income of the U.S. bars and nightclubs is forecasted to reach $25.74 billion.

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Are people living outside the metro areas cushioned against falling home prices?

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

The U.S. Census Bureau provides us with a lot of interesting data about new homes in their Survey of Construction. Today we look at the sale prices of homes in regard to their location (i.e. whether or not they are located in a Metropolitan Statistical Area).

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The global threat of Islamic terror

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

The first terrorist attack in the United States was recorded on April 14, 1865, when Abraham Lincoln was shot in Washington, D.C. and died a day after. Since then, terrorist attacks have occurred regularly in the country, but the most shocking attack in the history happened in New York City on September 11, 2001. As a result of the crashing of two hijacked planes into the World Trade Center towers, 2,759 people died and 8,700 were injured. Now the global threat is the Islamic State (ISIS), a terrorist organization that promotes violence and bloodshed and follows a very extreme form of Islam known as Salafism.

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Exercise and sleep: which is more important for your health?

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

A lot of people exercise first thing in the morning. With many of them leading quite busy lives, that usually means less sleep. And while nearly everyone understands the benefits of regular exercise for their health, the sleep is also quite important.

But is it actually more important? We are not talking about people who don’t get enough sleep even without trying to fit gym sessions into their schedule. But maybe you should ditch that morning workout if that puts you over the coveted seven hours of sleep?

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Motorcycle industry in the United States

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

In the past few decades, there has been a significant increase in the number of motorcycle sales and registrations in the United States. Motorcycle registrations in the United States have grown by 75 percent, from 3,826,373 in 1997 to 6,678,958 in 2006 (according to the United States Department of Transportation). If we examine the information showing the number of registered motorcycles (including private, commercial and publicly owned) published at Statista.com in 2013, we see that California had the highest number of registered motorcycles (799,990). Florida came in second with 545,452 registered motorcycles. In 2013, there were 443,856 motorcycles registered in Texas. In Ohio and Pennsylvania, the numbers of registered motorcycles amounted to 402,264 and 400,908 motorcycles respectively.

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Evolution of First Names: Unisex Names and Nicknames

Andrew B. Collier

Andrew B. Collier, Ph.D. Physics

In the two previous installments of our series on given names (Part 1 and Part 2),  we considered various aspects of the given name data from 1880 to the present day compiled by the Social Security Administration [1]. In this final article, we are going to have a look at the incidence of unisex names and nicknames.

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