Personal savings in the United States

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

According to statistics representing gross private savings in the United States, residents saved approximately $3.5 trillion as of the fourth quarter of 2015. In comparison, gross private savings in the country amounted to $3.63 trillion in 2014. In 2013 and 2012, gross private savings amounted to $3.35 trillion and $3.75 trillion respectively.

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Rise of personal income in the U.S.

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

Personal income in the U.S. has been constantly rising in recent years — personal income per capita increased by 3.5 percent in 2015, according to data from U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. We used this data, along with CPI data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, to calculate inflation-adjusted personal income changes for different areas. The dollar amounts in this post correspond to 2016 dollars.

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Grand theft auto cases in the United States

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

According to Statista.com, the number of motor vehicle theft cases in the United States is decreasing every year. Thus, there is a huge difference between 1990 and 2000 — the number decreased from 1,635,900 cases to 1,160,002 cases in the country overall. In 2005, an estimated 1,235,859 cases occurred nationwide. By 2010 the number of reported motor vehicle theft cases fell to 739,565. The numbers of car theft cases in 2011 and 2012 approximated to 716,508 and 723,186 respectively. In 2013 the number of motor vehicle theft cases amounted to 700,288 cases, and 689,527 cases in 2014.

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Young adults living with parents: education

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

As we have seen previously, the number of young adults living with parents has been steadily increasing in the past decades. In this post, we will examine how this trend relates to education. As before, we used IPUMS to get ACS data for multiple years and restricted our scope to people 18 to 34 years old.

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What were the trending baby names in the past decades?

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

The most popular baby names do not change frequently — Michael was on the top of the list from the 1960s until it was passed by Jacob in the 2000s. Mary was the most popular name for girls for the entire first half of the century.

On the other hand, it’s still interesting to see which names rapidly gained popularity in the past years. Since the official Social Security website provides data from Social Security card applications for each state, we can trace the geographical nature of such changes.

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Construction industry has a prosperous future

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

The United States is now the second-largest construction market in the world, holding about 10 percent of the total market share. In 2014, the construction sector accounted for 3.7 percent of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product, according to Statista.com. That rate was approximately the same 3.7 percent in 2013, compared to 3.6 percent in 2012. The American construction industry added the most value as a percentage of GDP in 2007 — 4.9 percent.

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Young adults living with parents: Employment

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

As we have previously seen, the number of young adults living with their parents has been steadily increasing in the past decades.

In this post, we will explore their employment, income and occupation. Again, we used IPUMS to get ACS data for multiple years. As before, we restricted our scope to people 18 to 34 years old.

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Generations through time: Immigration

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

Throughout history, the U.S. has been seen as a place of tremendous opportunity and progress. Many people took the challenge to pursue a new life in this country, and many of them stayed. However, western society has not stayed the same: each generation was influenced by different economic and social events. In this post, we will explore how migration patterns changed with each new generation.

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Love is in the air: Valentine’s gifts in America

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

Valentine’s Day is a holiday celebrated annually in February; some people love it, while others hate it. This day is a day where lovers both young and old give letters and flowers to their partners and spouses. It’s the only day of the year with hearts and Cupids all around. This day is widely celebrated in the United States.

According to a survey conducted by eGifter and published at Statista.com, Atlanta and Washington, D.C. were the most popular American cities for gifting on Valentine’s Day in 2014 — 47 percent of people here gave a gift. San Francisco, Houston and Boston also saw a high rate of Valentine’s Day gifting: 42 percent.

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Generations through time: Education

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

According to Dictionary.com, “generation” can be defined as “the entire body of individuals born and living at about the same time,” or “the term of years, roughly 30 among human beings, accepted as the average period between the birth of parents and the birth of their offspring.” Other definitions of the term include shared ideas and attitudes.

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