Age disparities in relationships: statistics

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

Males are older than their partners in two-thirds of all unmarried straight couples. In 22 percent of all cases, the difference is greater than five years. The opposite case, where the female is at least five years older, takes place in just 10 percent of all relationships.

Here’s the detailed chart showing the complete distribution.

Age disparity in unmarried couples

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Same-occupation couples: new estimates

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In this post, we will revisit the topic of occupation and marriage dependency, and same-occupation couples in particular. Recently, new five-year American Community Survey data was released by IPUMS USA. This is the most comprehensive version of the survey, having the widest coverage of the population (even in smaller areas).

Same-occupation couples

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Visualizing the Hispanic population of the U.S. in 2016

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

The percentage of America’s Hispanic population has been steadily increasing in the recent years. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2016 population estimates, it’s at 17.8 percent now, up from 16.4 percent six years ago.

Here’s an interactive map showing the percentage of Hispanic population by state and county. Note that you can click on any state to zoom in.

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The Rise of the New West

Benjamin Schultz

Benjamin Schultz, Ph.D. Geography

In terms of its significance to symbolism and cultural imagery, perhaps nothing is more quintessentially “American” than the Intermountain West (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming). The West is a living metaphor for values that so many Americans identify with, such as freedom, independence, individualism and self-reliance. The region is also home to some of our most iconic national parks like Yellowstone, Glacier and Grand Canyon.

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Occupational standing through time

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

One’s occupation is often associated with a certain level or group in society. This “general standing” or prestige of an occupation is often studied by sociologists. There is a significant debate about whether it can be broken down to individual characteristics like expected salary and education level or training to perform the job or requires analysis of a much more complex characteristic.

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What Has the Minimum Wage Done Across Time, and What Does it Have to do With Employment?

R.T. Young

R.T. Young, Ph.D. Business Economics

With minimum wage laws becoming more of a topic in 2013 (and in 2014 as well), here is a review of what the minimum wage has been across states throughout the years since 1938.

First, some background. The minimum wage was first introduced in the United States at the federal level in 1938 at $0.25 per hour. Since then, the minimum wage has increased 2,800 percent to $7.25 per hour. Interestingly, the 2,800 percent growth rate comes out to a 4.6 percent average annual growth rate, or about one percent faster than average wages have grown over the same period.

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The top-selling cars in the country

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

It’s interesting to analyze the information about the most popular and top-selling cars in the United States; even more interesting is the fact that in 2014, one of the most popular cars in the country was not made in the U.S. — Hyundai sold more than 240,000 Elantras in this year. The sedan was named “North American Car of the Year” at the 2012 Detroit Auto Show.

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