Age disparities in relationships: statistics

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

Males are older than their partners in two-thirds of all unmarried straight couples. In 22 percent of all cases, the difference is greater than five years. The opposite case, where the female is at least five years older, takes place in just 10 percent of all relationships.

Here’s the detailed chart showing the complete distribution.

Age disparity in unmarried couples

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Popular New Year’s resolutions

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

New Year’s is one of the most-celebrated days in the world. It’s the most wonderful time of the year, full of gifts and long-awaited surprises for those kids who didn’t misbehave.

According to a survey among young adults (published at Statista.com) in 2015, about 72 percent of respondents said that they typically spent New Year’s Eve at home. Slightly above 20 percent stated they were guests at someone else’s home on New Year’s Eve, and about 10 percent celebrated in a restaurant, bar or club.

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Same-occupation couples: new estimates

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

In this post, we will revisit the topic of occupation and marriage dependency, and same-occupation couples in particular. Recently, new five-year American Community Survey data was released by IPUMS USA. This is the most comprehensive version of the survey, having the widest coverage of the population (even in smaller areas).

Same-occupation couples

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Visualizing the Hispanic population of the U.S. in 2016

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

The percentage of America’s Hispanic population has been steadily increasing in the recent years. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2016 population estimates, it’s at 17.8 percent now, up from 16.4 percent six years ago.

Here’s an interactive map showing the percentage of Hispanic population by state and county. Note that you can click on any state to zoom in.

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The Rise of the New West

Benjamin Schultz

Benjamin Schultz, Ph.D. Geography

In terms of its significance to symbolism and cultural imagery, perhaps nothing is more quintessentially “American” than the Intermountain West (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming). The West is a living metaphor for values that so many Americans identify with, such as freedom, independence, individualism and self-reliance. The region is also home to some of our most iconic national parks like Yellowstone, Glacier and Grand Canyon.

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Occupational standing through time

Alexander Fishkov

Alexander Fishkov, Ph.D. student Computer Science

One’s occupation is often associated with a certain level or group in society. This “general standing” or prestige of an occupation is often studied by sociologists. There is a significant debate about whether it can be broken down to individual characteristics like expected salary and education level or training to perform the job or requires analysis of a much more complex characteristic.

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