Startup Hubs

Jeffery Green

Jeffery Green, J.D., Ph.D. (ABD) Political Science

A white paper released by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation finds that Kansas City and other areas viewed as “new” startup hubs have actually been fostering a culture of entrepreneurship for some time. Many of these cities have a history of strong technology sectors or have experienced strong growth among technology startups over the past two decades.

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Finished basements are becoming more popular, especially in large houses

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Survey of Construction, the number of new houses with basements is declining across the U.S., down by almost a quarter from 40 percent of new homes in 2000 to 32 percent in 2013. Surprisingly, not only did the relative number of finished basements rise, but there has also been an increase in the absolute percentage: nine percent of all new homes in the U.S. now have a finished basement.

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Donald Trump against the News media: who tells the truth?

Pavel Prikhodko, Ph.D. Machine Learning

You can like or dislike Donald Trump, but it’s hard not to talk about him. A survey on whether President Trump or the news media can be more trusted to tell the truth about important issues in the United States revealed some interesting results (the survey was conducted in February 2017). According to the survey, about 37 percent of the respondents said that they trust newly-elected President Trump to tell the truth about important issues more than the media. The largest share of respondents (52 percent) stated that they trust the news media more, while only 10 percent were unsure about the answer or didn’t answer at all.

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The United States population growth stems from average-sized cities

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

According to a recent U.S. Census Bureau press release, a majority (62.7 percent) of the United States population lives in cities or incorporated places.

The exact percentage of such population varies from state to state, as pictured in the referenced report. The dynamic is also relatively patchy — take a look at the following map:

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Population and Exercise Activity

Jeffery Green

Jeffery Green, J.D., Ph.D. (ABD) Political Science

The benefits of exercise are well-documented as crucial to overall health (Sullum, Clark, and King, 2000). Some of the documented physical benefits of exercise include increased muscle and bone strength, a decrease in body fat, and overall fitness (Blair and Rodney, 1999; Warburton et al., 2001). Physical activity also has been demonstrated to improve the health status of chronically ill individuals (Paffenbarger et al. 1986).

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The price premium for multi-floor homes is decreasing

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

Most people looking to buy a home likely consider at some point whether or not they want to have a second floor. There are many things to consider here: does someone in your family have any trouble climbing the stairs? Do you have small children who might fall from them? How much land area would you save? And do you enjoy having bedrooms and your kitchen on different floors?

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Telling stories through data