Administrative support services are shifting to larger companies

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

Another subsector showing interesting employment dynamics is Administrative Support and Services. During the last years, it has been posting steadily increasing employment numbers.

In the most recent County Business Patterns data though, it seems as if the growth has slowed down for all but the largest companies (500+ employees). While the growth in the other two size classes, small (less than 100 employees) and medium (from 100 to 499) companies, has been only marginal, almost 300,000 jobs were created by the largest companies since the previous data release.

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Picturing the American Family Today

Kristine Barseghyan

Kristine Barseghyan, Ph.D. (ABD) Social Sciences

Since the 1950s – the decade of all-time highest marriage rates, youngest families and “Mrs.” degrees – the social institutions of marriage and family in the United States have changed dramatically. The marriage rate dropped from 143 to 31 in 2012, and today less than half of women (47.1 percent) are married. In contrast, the proportion of divorced or separated women has significantly increased (14 percent). The share of married men is slightly higher (50.6 percent), and the share of divorced or separated men is lower (11 percent).

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The Social Geography of Evangelicals in America

Benjamin Schultz

Benjamin Schultz, Ph.D. Geography

After experiencing strong growth throughout the 1990s and 2000s, Evangelical Christianity is now the largest religious denomination in the United States. Due to its size and growing political significance, this group has entered into the national spotlight, sparking curiosity on the part of people who do not live communities with a strong Evangelical presence.

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The popularity of small general stores is rising

Andrey Kamenov

Andrey Kamenov, Ph.D. Probability and Statistics

In this post, we continue to look into the recently-released County Business Patterns data. The one type of business that has suffered a significant decrease in employment numbers is general merchandise stores. In the South, its decrease is the largest one across all sectors within the same NAICS level.

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Hot in the City: Urban Heat Islands and Lightning

Andrew B. Collier

Andrew B. Collier, Ph.D. Physics

Hot in the city, hot in the city tonight, tonight
Hot in the city, hot in the city tonight, tonight

Billy Idol, Hot in the City (1982)

Is there a reason to believe that cities are warmer than the suburbs and nearby countryside? Indeed, there is! The concept of an Urban Heat Island (UHI) has been around since the beginning of the 19th century when Luke Howard made temperature measurements in and around the city of London [1]. A UHI is an area centered on a metropolis, where the temperature is appreciably higher than the surrounding rural areas. There are two major contributors to this effect:

  1. differences in land surface materials (those in a city tend to store more heat), and
  2. waste heat and pollution associated with high population density, traffic and industry.

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Education Funding Disparity

Jeffery Green

Jeffery Green, J.D., Ph.D. (ABD) Political Science

It is often the case that one does not need to travel a great distance to witness disparities in the distribution of public goods across a state. Since humans began clustering in organized societies, there has always been a hub and spoke effect between centers of trade and government and peripheral regions. Wealth and public goods historically center on the hub, while the remainder is often apportioned out to peripheral regions. To be clear, this is not always a product of greed or an act of thumbing the government nose at the hinterlands. Often there are bona fide reasons for distributing public goods in this manner. The hubs are often centers of commerce and government, and, therefore, attract more people. As such, more public services need to be provided, resulting in more funding.

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Are Individuals Moving to States With Little to No Income Tax?

R.T. Young

R.T. Young, Ph.D. Business Economics

Are individuals moving from higher tax states to lower tax states?

The hotly-debated issue has two components.

First, how big is the movement of individuals between states? Is the shift something worth worrying about?

Second, could taxes be a possible explanation for the movement of individuals from one state to another? In particular, is income tax a major culprit?

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Telling stories through data