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Welcome To Case's Column

Let me say a big welcome to all of you for joining me here. I'm going to call these blog meetings Case's Column. I wanted to use "Corner", but that was already taken. Since 2008, it's been a real privilege to come on here and share some of my life with you, and it's a big world where we live.

In these blogs, I'll just speak whatever is on my mind, but we will be playing within the rules here. I may pick a particular topic, point out an event, or shoot the breeze. I'm a little bit of an essayist at times, so I'll just speak what's on my mind, and I might tell a story or two. Or, I might spew out an opinion or three. There will be some serious moments, some tender, some poignant, but there will also be those moments that you'll just bust out laughing. But, hopefully, everything will be in good fun here. And, of course, there's a place below for your comments and thoughts as we go along here. So feel free to join me for the ride -- I sure as heck hope I'm doing this right and not making any mistakes.

Thanks for taking your time in reading Case's Column. Hopefully, you'll enjoy being entertained by it as much as I've enjoyed putting these writings together. And thanks for the time you spend in City-Data.com, where it's great to be alive!

Regards,

case44

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Texas Still Has Room To Grow, But West Texas Needs To Be Looked At

Posted 12-26-2021 at 06:22 PM by case44
Updated 01-03-2022 at 07:23 PM by case44


When you hear people talking about moving to Texas, the four areas most talked about are usually Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin. Those usually are what comes first in many people's minds.

Now, there is starting to become more focus on other Texas communities which have been or are going to start seeing growth spurts. And they are places you may not first expect. Places like Tyler, Killeen, Sherman-Denison, Texarkana, Corpus Christi, McAllen, and Waco (thanks in no small part to Chip and Joanna Gaines of HGTV fame). And then, you look at the West Texas locales. Tons of potential exist in these places: San Angelo, Abilene, Amarillo, Midland-Odessa, El Paso, and Lubbock. I've written a lot about Lubbock in my blog haven for many moons now, and in the last two decades, that city has had the largest growth spurt in its history. There is every reason to believe that that area could start to experience a lot of the things that Austin has had for the last thirty years, especially with three suburbs undergoing significant population gains. Remember, it wasn't really that long ago that Austin's downtown did not have many tall buildings.

From a business and economic standpoint, I think other folks are realizing the potential in Lubbock and, also, Amarillo. And with the prospect of a potential Interstate 27 extension plan which will be in heavy discussion in the future, it could well be a game-changer for both of those cities, as well as San Angelo, which is also in the path for a potential proposed Interstate 14 alignment. There's more than a boatload of space in West Texas. Really. And one has to also consider that an investment needs to be remade in small towns across America. Instead of seeing small Texas towns wither away, someone needs to step up and see the value and a potential of a revitalized commnunity. Investors and innovators could turn dog poop into gold. Yes, it can be done.

I'm not saying to completely ignore the eastern half of Texas. I'm just imploring those looking to do something positive and game-changing to take a good look at West Texas. Why isn't Fort Stockton a medium-sized city, given its location on I-10? It's a great pause between San Antonio and El Paso and is 100 miles from Midland. The gateway to Big Bend, they like to call it. Why not make it bigger and a hub of activity for the Big Bend region? Oh, sure, it's small now, but Paisano Pete wouldn't mind a few big companies and corporations moving in, along with a lot more commerce and an updated thoroughfare plan. It's not that far-fetched. And then you have Midland, which has a better downtown structure than what Lubbock is currently offering, but who also has a population that is 100,000 less than the Hub City. Even so, Midland has also had a significantly larger population gain there than it's ever had in the last ten years. It's also its highest in percentage since the 1950s. Houses are going in at a fiercer rate than I've seen in that area. Way up north in Amarillo, where I just was on a recent road trip, that city is undergoing some growth of its own, and that's going to be underscored by the upgrade of State Highway 335 into a full freeway. Imagine the fruits of that labor when that rascal becomes halfway done.

Folks, if you're coming to Texas and you want your business to expand, then I've got great news for you. You can look at Dallas all you want, but do check out West Texas. Look for the untapped potential. You just might be surprised.
Posted in Uncategorized
Views 255 Comments 4
Total Comments 4

Comments

  1. Old Comment
    I see potential in Van Horn, Abilene, San Marcos and Hico
    permalink
    Posted 01-01-2022 at 10:06 PM by MoNative34 MoNative34 is offline
  2. Old Comment
    A Harvard professor on Twitter asked where it would make the most sense to put in a large city where there currently isn’t one. A woman responded with a large circle drawn on a map, with Lubbock and Midland being close to the center of it. Being Twitter, there were lots of snarky replies to the woman.

    However, Kyle Jacobson of the Lubbock CoC wrote this:

    Quote:
    It's 650 miles between the I-25 corridor (El Paso, Las Cruces, Albuquerque) and the I-35 corridor (San Antonio, Austin, DFW).

    The future I-27 corridor of Amarillo, Lubbock, and Midland-Odessa, TX (combined metro pop. ~1M) splits the difference exactly halfway.

    So, West Texas.

    Census data shows the South and West regions are the fastest growing in the U.S. The American West is spread out, but with the growth of Denver, Phoenix, Salt Lake City, etc., West Texas makes sense as a hub for growth between that and the San Antonio to Oklahoma City corridor.

    We've got a regional economy that complements the rest of the state's economic portfolio, a world-class university with 40,000 students, and an abundance of natural resources. Give us the infrastructure - I-27 and broadband - and let's take this rocket ship to the moon.
    Someone replied that the only thing in the way was water, but Jacobson responded that that was a concern for a lot of places around the US, not just W. Texas.

    I agree. So, you’re right again, in my opinion.
    permalink
    Posted 01-03-2022 at 10:50 AM by shoe01 shoe01 is offline
  3. Old Comment
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MoNative34 View Comment
    I see potential in Van Horn, Abilene, San Marcos and Hico
    With three out of the four, there's no denying. It depends on how each place wants to move ahead.

    Well, Van Horn had better get busy, or else it will become dust in about twenty years. Their relationship with NASA will certainly help, but this is a place where people can invest in something. America must start investing in small towns and I still maintain that.

    Abilene is slowly growing, but their big step is a new convention center hotel which Doubletree will operate once it opens up next year.

    San Marcos is in a great spot, as it's between Austin and San Antonio. Pretty soon, there won't be much rural space left.

    And Hico probably won't get real far, but it's a nice little stop on U.S. 281. They have a quaint little chocolate store which I'd love to visit.
    permalink
    Posted 01-03-2022 at 07:11 PM by case44 case44 is offline
  4. Old Comment
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by shoe01 View Comment
    A Harvard professor on Twitter asked where it would make the most sense to put in a large city where there currently isn’t one. A woman responded with a large circle drawn on a map, with Lubbock and Midland being close to the center of it. Being Twitter, there were lots of snarky replies to the woman.


    Someone replied that the only thing in the way was water, but Jacobson responded that that was a concern for a lot of places around the US, not just W. Texas.

    I agree. So, you’re right again, in my opinion.
    That Harvard professor should move to Tech....

    What I'm just trying to do, and not just on this site, but anywhere people will be open, is shed some light on an entire region of a very large state. And, yes, we need I-27 as a huge part of said region. I'll be proven right again when the chief cities along that proposed route have at least a fifty percent population gain and when shovels get pushed in key places.
    permalink
    Posted 01-03-2022 at 07:17 PM by case44 case44 is offline
 

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