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Old 09-25-2012, 08:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
I just checked another Russian language nickname site (which in my haste I neglected to note), which indicated that "Alik" could be a nickname for Oleg. I thought "Alik" was more common for Alexander, but perhaps "Sasha" goes with Alexander and "Alik" goes with Oleg?? Nim, can you enlighten us?

"Alec" would be the more common American/English language spelling for "Alik", but the pronunciation is the same or very, very similar...perhaps this would be a solution acceptable to all.
As far as I know, I've never heard Alik used as a nickname for Oleg, but I do think that Russian name practices don't necessarily have to be strictly adhered to so using Alik as an alternative to Oleg is still a possibility. After all, I knew an adopted Russian girl named Ilya, which is actually typically a boy's name in Russia (it corresponds to English Elijah and Hebrew Eliahu). IMO, Alik sounds infinitely better than Oleg in English. In fact, come to think of it, the true Russian pronunciation of Олег Oleg is really a lot closer to Alik than Oh-layg. Unstressed O's sound like ah in Russian; the e is really a ye sound, and the G sound becomes a K sound at the end of the word, so it's really more like Alyek. The American-sounding and American-spelled "Alec" sounds farther from the true Russian Oleg than "Alik", but still sounds closer than the way an American would pronounce "Oleg".

 
Old 09-25-2012, 08:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
I love the nickname "Misha" for Mikhail and I think it sounds very nice to American ears.

Oleg does sound a bit formal, or like something you'd call a middle-aged man in Russian, not a young kid. Russian uses a lot of diminutive name forms, so here are some you could use: Olezhka (where zh = s in vision), Olezhen'ka, Olezhechka, Olegushka, Olezhek, Lega, Leka, Lesha. Honestly I think the only ones that American could grasp would be Olezhek, Lega, Leka, and Lesha. Lega is the same as Oleg in terms of sounding like "leg", IMO. Leka and Lesha would more accurately be approximated to the Russian by using the Lay-kuh and Lay-shuh American pronunciations (as opposed to the Lee-kuh and Lee-shuh ones). But then Leka would sound a lot like Lake-a so I think Lesha is your best bet, though he will probably be mistaken for female on paper a lot (since Leisha is an actual female name).
I was thinking Alec for Oleg too. (edited after seeing Nimchimpsky and Craig's recent exchange)

Olya sounds nice - is the emphasis on the "y", eg O-leee-a?

Even though I liked Olesya, the names that I think sound similar are Alicia (as pointed out by Craig) and Olivia.

The other thing might be took look up the "meaning" of the names and perhaps find another name with the same meaning in another language. For example, I note that both Olga and Oleg mean "holy". I looked to see what was in other languages for Olga, and there is Agnes and Ines. I quite like Ines (I had an aunt by that name), there is something elegant about it. Agnes is a name that is more acquainted with older people too, however, there is a model called Agyness who gives the name a degree of "cool".

That last bit is also a point as well. Some names that may be considered old fashioned just suit some people. Quite often a lovely actress or beautiful model with an otherwise old fashioned name can actually give that name a bit of a boost.

It is the same with friends - when you really like someone, often you can end up liking their name more than you might have otherwise.

Updated to add that the following is a list of names meaning "holy" for girls (filter to find names for boys).

http://www.thinkbabynames.com/search/0/holy

Last edited by susankate; 09-25-2012 at 09:14 PM..
 
Old 09-25-2012, 09:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by susankate View Post
What about Alec for Oleg?

Olya sounds nice - is the emphasis on the "y", eg O-leee-a?

Even though I liked Olesya, the names that I think sound similar are Alicia (as pointed out by Craig) and Olivia.

The other thing might be took look up the "meaning" of the names and perhaps find an English name with the same meaning.
The emphasis is on the O, as in Oohhh-lyuh. I should note that the Russian O sounds a bit different from English oh. It sounds like the O in "old".

I think that's another wise choice. Oleg means "holy" so I imagine there are a lot of Americanized names that also mean "holy".
 
Old 09-25-2012, 09:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
The emphasis is on the O, as in Oohhh-lyuh. I should note that the Russian O sounds a bit different from English oh. It sounds like the O in "old".

I think that's another wise choice. Oleg means "holy" so I imagine there are a lot of Americanized names that also mean "holy".
I just finished modifying my above post, so I have added a link to a "names" site which gives all the names meaning "holy". There are surprisingly few male names.
 
Old 09-25-2012, 09:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by susankate View Post
I just finished modifying my above post, so I have added a link to a "names" site which gives all the names meaning "holy". There are surprisingly few male names.
Elga and Helga in that list correspond to Russian Olga. Not to mention Olga is one of the names listed.
 
Old 09-25-2012, 11:33 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Your friend would be wrong.

It is still one of the more popular baby names in Russia. It means sacred.
Russian Male Names - Names for Men in Russian
You misunderstood me. My friend, Katya Dobrovina, born in Kiev, UA whose first language is Russian not Ukrainian, said the word "adorable" sounds terrible to her and it reminds her of a Russian word for "born inside out". Her Russian, Ukrainian, German and French are flawless.

Her English? Not so much. So "born inside out" might not be exact.

I was using that to illustrate how a word to a speaker of English that sounds innocuous, might sound odd to a Russian speaker. And the other way around.

I'm less interested in what the name means than I am how it sounds - to the child and to us and with our sur name. Also, how the general public perceives people with that name. There is actually a sub field. of sociology - my background that studies this.

Between Olga and GaGa and Oleg and pick a pop star - Beber" there has to be an idea.

It will not be Oleg and Olga. My friend Katya tells me that they are out of favor in Ukraine and the kids will most likely want new names.

I like Katya quite a bit and she will be one of the God Parents. Her name is actually Ykaterina. She goes by a a plethora of nick names, many, as Nim pointed out almost as long as the original name.
 
Old 09-25-2012, 11:40 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
It deeply disturbs me the amount of contempt for the countries and cultures some people are showing while trying to adopt from those same countries. Yes, each country has unpleasant and down right revolting things about their culture, INCLUDING THIS ONE, yet, adoptive parents are summing up entire cultures based on orphanages or treating animals as food stock (and really not a huge difference morally between eating a pig or eating a dog). How terrible to raise a child born in a culture that one obviously has such dripping disdain for, no wonder there is forever a small subset of self-hating adoptees who hate their race.
I don't know any adoptees who hate themselves. I am American and I am most critical of my own country. I am sickened by Nationalism of any sort.
 
Old 09-25-2012, 11:46 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,636 posts, read 23,224,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Olga also gets shortened to Olya in Russian. Most Olgas I know go by Olya, except when they're old ladies that have long nails and wear too much perfume, then it's Olga.
See that's what I mean! And very bleached hair and lots of make up. Also overweight. All Olgas I have met fit this disruption. Kind of like a Russian Bertha or Mildred but more flashy.

Bertha and Mildred are frumpy. I am only half kidding.
 
Old 09-25-2012, 11:52 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,636 posts, read 23,224,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Elga and Helga in that list correspond to Russian Olga. Not to mention Olga is one of the names listed.
Helga is another name I associate with the geriatric set. And names begging with O? Never my favorite.
 
Old 09-26-2012, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,003 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
As far as I know, I've never heard Alik used as a nickname for Oleg, but I do think that Russian name practices don't necessarily have to be strictly adhered to so using Alik as an alternative to Oleg is still a possibility. After all, I knew an adopted Russian girl named Ilya, which is actually typically a boy's name in Russia (it corresponds to English Elijah and Hebrew Eliahu). IMO, Alik sounds infinitely better than Oleg in English. In fact, come to think of it, the true Russian pronunciation of Олег Oleg is really a lot closer to Alik than Oh-layg. Unstressed O's sound like ah in Russian; the e is really a ye sound, and the G sound becomes a K sound at the end of the word, so it's really more like Alyek. The American-sounding and American-spelled "Alec" sounds farther from the true Russian Oleg than "Alik", but still sounds closer than the way an American would pronounce "Oleg".
The bolded made me smile. Any American of a certain age who remembers the 1960 TV series "Man from U.N.C.L.E." would know that!

As a matter of fact, we had an engineer working with us temporarily. His name was Illya, and when he was introduced, I immediately (and in retrospect, rather stupidly) said, "Illya Kuryakin!" He looked perplexed and said, "Why does everyone say that to me?" I had to explain to him that it was the only way most Americans were familiar with that name.
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