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Old 09-26-2012, 12:19 PM
 
10,366 posts, read 8,372,005 times
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Sheena, your comment about "adorable" made me smile, as that rapidly became the favorite word of one of my young relatives who joined our family via adoption from EE.

When this child was first learning English, EVERYTHING the child liked was "adorable!!": kittens, chocolate candy, a bicycle, books, stuffed toys, new clothes, pretty scenery, a wading pool, good food, newly-met relatives...all were "adorable!" The youngster rapidly learned similar words - pretty, cute, nice, etc., but "adorable" remained a favorite for a long time.

Like you, I have no idea if there is a Russian word which sounds similar but which carries a less that positive meaning.

 
Old 09-26-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,591 posts, read 23,145,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
The bolded made me smile. Any American of a certain age who remembers the 1960 TV series "Man from U.N.C.L.E." would know that!

As a matter of fact, we had an engineer working with us temporarily. His name was Illya, and when he was introduced, I immediately (and in retrospect, rather stupidly) said, "Illya Kuryakin!" He looked perplexed and said, "Why does everyone say that to me?" I had to explain to him that it was the only way most Americans were familiar with that name.
My first crush (on a non Rock Star) was Ilya. Who was from Kiev!
 
Old 09-26-2012, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Warren, OH
2,748 posts, read 3,325,566 times
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We intend to give them new names as their parents. names that we think will suit them in their new country.

They will know they are Ukrainian and they will know about the woman who birthed them and their mother who adopted them.

If when we meet them they seem overly interested in the fantasy of being reunited with their original family, and we are advised by a professional that this is deep seated - or if it seems than we have not much in common we would probably pass. With hosting prospective parents and their children get this opportunity.

Adoption involves adjustment for everyone involved. A new country and culture. Parents instead of an orphanage. A room of ones own. New clothes, warm homes family trips, birthday celebrations, Halloween, Christmas gifts,new siblings and depending on the parents, new names.

We would never say You are AMANDA now and that's it. We want to give them say, but as with our other children, thi9s is not a kid run home. Knowing my wife, she'll make the whole thing fun!

Out of all of the kids we hosted over the years not one did not ask us to adopt them.

It is our hope that we can be a bi-lingual family too because these children will arive with a language that they already speak where as our daughter did not.
 
Old 09-27-2012, 08:53 PM
 
116 posts, read 85,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
See that's what I mean! And very bleached hair and lots of make up. Also overweight. All Olgas I have met fit this disruption. Kind of like a Russian Bertha or Mildred but more flashy.

Bertha and Mildred are frumpy. I am only half kidding.
While you may be kidding, I have an Aunt Bertha who is 85 years old, wears frilly skirts, stockings, slight heals, blouses, and curly hair. She wieghs 110 pounds. Her personality is charming and witty. Quite unlike the steryotype.

We all had a big laugh a few years ago when there was a TV show with a big, big German or Russian woman sounding mean, but really, if you were named Olga, you wouldn't like the jokes and steryotypes.

What if you were adopted and your adoptive parents chagned your name and you searched and found, only to find out that your name at birth really was Olga? But your adoptive family laughed at stereotypes like this? Wouldn't you feel bad? Inferior?
 
Old 09-27-2012, 10:22 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,591 posts, read 23,145,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Thank you Julia for your last several posts. Sheena has bent over backwards trying to explain what she and her husband feel is appropriate for their family and she has been disrespected for doing so.

The bottom line here is that each family has the right to choose how to handle the name issue and should not feel compelled to explain to others. Discussion is great and I have learned a lot of new information from this adoption forum in the past few weeks. However when discussion turns to berating and accusing we all tend to put up defenses.

Our Korean daughter is a full fledged adult at 29. We too tried all the PC things Sheena and I have explained in previous posts and our daughters were not interested, in fact protested Korean anything being referred to. It was not a teenage temporary thing for my daughter. Today she is concentrating on her career, her SO and that important relationship and in general life as she knows it to be---not some imaginary life it could have been. I think she has a very healthy outlook on life.
This is another woman's account of adoption. Her eldest daughter is now 29. Mine, 16.
People are just not all alike.

And, everyone ignores the fact that we are not in general a very "flesh and blood" family. We are not ethnic and our families have been here quite a while.

I tried what The Adoption Community said to do. She didn't like it at all.

So now? I am going to use mothers intuition, the way I've done with my son. It's worked out well and I'm sticking with what works, and staying away from what has not.
 
Old 09-27-2012, 10:28 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,591 posts, read 23,145,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaykee View Post
While you may be kidding, I have an Aunt Bertha who is 85 years old, wears frilly skirts, stockings, slight heals, blouses, and curly hair. She wieghs 110 pounds. Her personality is charming and witty. Quite unlike the steryotype.

We all had a big laugh a few years ago when there was a TV show with a big, big German or Russian woman sounding mean, but really, if you were named Olga, you wouldn't like the jokes and steryotypes.

What if you were adopted and your adoptive parents chagned your name and you searched and found, only to find out that your name at birth really was Olga? But your adoptive family laughed at stereotypes like this? Wouldn't you feel bad? Inferior?
No. I'd be happy that my name was not Bertha and Olga. Not good blind date names for 21st century America.

I'd be thankful! I was NOT the one who first brought op the "Olga" stereotype. Nimchimpky did. I was laughing out of recognition and because of her on target veracity and irony.

It was a joke. We both found it funny.
 
Old 09-27-2012, 10:59 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,591 posts, read 23,145,754 times
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OK nameologists, I will have two kids who will visit our home in December. We have decided, along with out coordinator, that their names are not suitable for children living in 21st century America - or 21st century Eastern Europe.

They will convey a stodgy image, and will possibly cause the children to be the butt of jokes.

My two eldest have names that straddle classic and contemporary. They both begin with consonants, one with a 'K" sound, the other with a "Ch" sound as in Chuck.

I am not a fan of the Duggar family ( 19 kids and counting) and the way all of their kids have "J" names. (I am not a fan of way more than that)

I was thinking that I could use vowel beginning names that sound like names inn Russian, yet will fit into the US name pool.

For the boy - Evan, Ethan, Aaron,Eric, Alec (Alexander is our because in our families we don't name children names used by cousins, and there is an Alexander on each side of the family so that's a double no.

For the girl, I have always loved Abigail. My husband thought it was too old fashioned the first time, but not it's become more popular. Other vowel names Aimee, Anya and Alessandra, Emerson (Emmy)

Or their is a case to be made for family cohesiveness. Continuising with the C, K, S, sounds which would blend well.

My children favor - Corbin, Carlin, Cash, Carter and Chase. Clayton, Collin.

Girls - Kristine and variants (my grandmother's name) Kyra, Cady, Cathryn/Katheryn, Claire, Cara Beth.

Other random names that we like - Serena, Sarah Beth, Bethany, Sabrina, Suzannah, Carina, Catiana,

Boys - Blake, Bryce, Reed, Rowan, Miles, Milo, Brett and Caelum.

Any suggestions?
 
Old 09-28-2012, 12:43 AM
 
4,128 posts, read 13,273,586 times
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Oh boy, not a nameologist (does one even exist <G>) but given the choices, would of course give the kids the final choice but would nix Milo (too much like the movie), also Caelum (too unusual, not even sure how to pronounce it). Would also nix Cash.

Re girls' names, if she likes Katiana, would make sure to spell it w/ a K and for the sake of brevity, would keep the spelling of Suzannah w/o the H - also might nix Sarah Beth/Cara Beth simply bc the girl may want her first name (Uk) to become her middle name and would spell Katherine/Catherine that way which might be more common than w/ the 'ryn' ending. If she did like Cara, would spell it w/ a K. Would probably lean to the K spelling of a name as well (Katiana, Karina), just a personal thing and may be more translatable (if that's a word) from UK, but no biggie. Would probably go w/ Katie rather than Cady - or it can be a nickname for Katherine.

IMO the boys' names are OK w/ the C spelling - those names would def. look unusual spelled w/ a K - not sure how I feel about Emerson, it sounds kind of masculine, maybe Emma (Emmy) - ? The last line of the boy names are nice but might spell Reed ReId as reed might be confusing (the meaning, ie grass, reed), then again the spelling Reid might be confusing but at least it's a short name, lol.

Just some rambling thoughts, it's good to get your family's input and those of interested on CD but bottom line, it's up to the kids whose names might be changed - would keep in mind compromising but would give the kids the final say-so of their names, the main thing is that they like their names (wouldnt have it as a deal breaker though, it's kind of a personal thing and being young and not being native Eng speakers, they may not even be able to express their feelings, even w/ the help of a translator) - JMO FWIT - HTH -
 
Old 09-28-2012, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Liberal Coast
4,277 posts, read 5,157,324 times
Reputation: 3889
Anastasia. Just sayin'.

Ivan. I don't like giving kids from another culture a very American name.

Last edited by psr13; 09-28-2012 at 12:59 AM..
 
Old 09-28-2012, 01:33 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,591 posts, read 23,145,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psr13 View Post
Anastasia. Just sayin'.

Ivan. I don't like giving kids from another culture a very American name.
I know. But we do.
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