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Old 09-28-2012, 02:36 PM
 
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I c/b wrong but my understanding was that not all the children coming for the host programs are available for adoption and sometimes it's not apparent til the child is here and the host family is actually hosting -for some it's a cultural visit, I also thought it was a no-no to even mention the possibility of adoption for a variety of reasons (others who might not get adopted), much less any possible name changes (which does seem a bit putting the cart before the horse) -?

 
Old 09-28-2012, 02:42 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Sometimes I wish the Russian word for "orphanage" was a bit more faithful to the actual feeling of orphanages. There is nothing homey about a Russian orphanage. It should be called детский институт detsky institut "children's institution" or something.
I agree. But are there not several words for children in Russian, with "detsky" being the one that is most legal and non sentimental.

I found this very cute - when we hosted a little four year old (NO four year olds are NOT permitted to be hosted by Ukraine - the AMERICAN agency did something dishonest), we took him and his interpreter out to dinner at a very large, chrome - silver diner - and he had never eaten in a restaurant , nor had he ever seen a completely silver, retro diner that loomed above him with neon signs and flashing lights. He started screaming in Russian "Nyet Nyet - "No NO! I do not want to go to such a place! This is a SPACE SHIP! I do not want to go here Mamma!" I was pulling on my arm, begging to go back to Machina (car) to Nashe Doma (our house) This all on the second day of hosting!

The iteroreter enprained to him "No Andrushiska, this is not a space ship! It his a HOUS OF FOOD!!!"
He began to rub his cute little tummy in antisipation.

Inside he ordered Borscht, potato pancakes, pierogies and cabbage, and must have eaten five pickels.
( this was in NY, where these foods are common)
After the meal, he pronounced it Kooshna! ( tasty) and asked if we could return soon to the "Big American House of Food!
 
Old 09-28-2012, 03:33 PM
 
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Sheena, Thanks for answering without issue....I'm seriously hoping things go as you want and that the children love the US and your family. I would still hold off on the naming a child that has already had the same name for many years...But, that's just my opinion. All the best, JanND
 
Old 09-28-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Originally Posted by JanND View Post
Sheena, Thanks for answering without issue....I'm seriously hoping things go as you want and that the children love the US and your family. I would still hold off on the naming a child that has already had the same name for many years...But, that's just my opinion. All the best, JanND
You are welcome. I reallly don't want to fight. At all. Your well wishes mean a lot to me.

Having hosted as many kids as I have, many of the WANT American names, because their original given names have bad - sometimes horrible associations.

I don't much care if they "love the US" but I want them to fit in and to not feel like out casts. We would NEVER force a name on a child who was old enough to voice an opinion that he or she did not like.

There will be dialog, please trust us!

For us, this is a HAPPY TIME - not unlike those who post on the Pregnancy Forum to discuss names with their CD friends. I'm an Old Timer on City DATA , and I have friends here, some who I have met IRL, on facebook or spoken to by phone.

So naturally, I'd want to share this news with CD.
 
Old 09-28-2012, 04:11 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Originally Posted by Honeycrisp View Post
I c/b wrong but my understanding was that not all the children coming for the host programs are available for adoption and sometimes it's not apparent til the child is here and the host family is actually hosting -for some it's a cultural visit, I also thought it was a no-no to even mention the possibility of adoption for a variety of reasons (others who might not get adopted), much less any possible name changes (which does seem a bit putting the cart before the horse) -?
No you are not incorrect that with some programs all of the kids are not available for adoption. In ours they are and we are getting our paperwork ready now.

The home study must be conducted in our future state.

We will not mention adoption issues until the visit goes well and we have committed to these children. We actually already have, because of the reports from orphanage directors and the info from our facilitator. Barring anything extreme - attempted murder? - we intend to adopt these children.

So we are sharing this with our CD friends and the CD community.
 
Old 09-28-2012, 04:22 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Originally Posted by Honeycrisp View Post
Oh boy, not a nameologist (does one even exist <G>) but given the choices, would of course give the kids the final choice but would nix Milo (too much like the movie), also Caelum (too unusual, not even sure how to pronounce it). Would also nix Cash.

Re girls' names, if she likes Katiana, would make sure to spell it w/ a K and for the sake of brevity, would keep the spelling of Suzannah w/o the H - also might nix Sarah Beth/Cara Beth simply bc the girl may want her first name (Uk) to become her middle name and would spell Katherine/Catherine that way which might be more common than w/ the 'ryn' ending. If she did like Cara, would spell it w/ a K. Would probably lean to the K spelling of a name as well (Katiana, Karina), just a personal thing and may be more translatable (if that's a word) from UK, but no biggie. Would probably go w/ Katie rather than Cady - or it can be a nickname for Katherine.

IMO the boys' names are OK w/ the C spelling - those names would def. look unusual spelled w/ a K - not sure how I feel about Emerson, it sounds kind of masculine, maybe Emma (Emmy) - ? The last line of the boy names are nice but might spell Reed ReId as reed might be confusing (the meaning, ie grass, reed), then again the spelling Reid might be confusing but at least it's a short name, lol.

Just some rambling thoughts, it's good to get your family's input and those of interested on CD but bottom line, it's up to the kids whose names might be changed - would keep in mind compromising but would give the kids the final say-so of their names, the main thing is that they like their names (wouldnt have it as a deal breaker though, it's kind of a personal thing and being young and not being native Eng speakers, they may not even be able to express their feelings, even w/ the help of a translator) - JMO FWIT - HTH -
Some good suggestions and food for thought. I am confused you would lean to the K over the C spelling or would not?

My favorite girls name right now is Abigail. Abigail Christine after my grandmother. I am worried that the Biblical Abigail might sound bad to Russian speakers.

Oh Nimchipsky? Where are you?
 
Old 09-28-2012, 04:32 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
I prefer traditional names over trendy. Michael, Nicholas, Anna.
Julia I love your name by the way! Our unofficially adopted daughter in Ukraine ( we wanted to adopt her but we were prevented because she was 16 at the time) is Yulia - Russian for your name but likes Julia/ Julia.

Are these names traditional to you ( one woman's traditional is another woman's trendy)

Abigail, ( my fave) Amiee, Claire, Serena, and Christine?

For boys Ethan, Evan, Aaron, and Blake?

Cady was a nod to suffragist Elizabeth Cady - Cady Elizabeth.

Kyra and Anya are Eastern Euro names but are less grim and formal than Luydmilla, (Luda) or Igor.
 
Old 09-28-2012, 09:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Some good suggestions and food for thought. I am confused you would lean to the K over the C spelling or would not?

My favorite girls name right now is Abigail. Abigail Christine after my grandmother. I am worried that the Biblical Abigail might sound bad to Russian speakers.

Oh Nimchipsky? Where are you?
Abigail sounds weird to my Russian ear. It would sound more like Ah-bee-gehlj with lj being like the li in million. But it could be nicely shortened to Abi, which is much more palatable to the Russian ear. Christine actually has a Slavic equivalent, Hristina. Though a bit unusual of a name in Russia, it does pull enough on Greek etymology to pass nicely, since Russian borrows heavily from Greek, for names.
 
Old 09-28-2012, 09:09 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,641,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Julia I love your name by the way! Our unofficially adopted daughter in Ukraine ( we wanted to adopt her but we were prevented because she was 16 at the time) is Yulia - Russian for your name but likes Julia/ Julia.

Are these names traditional to you ( one woman's traditional is another woman's trendy)

Abigail, ( my fave) Amiee, Claire, Serena, and Christine?

For boys Ethan, Evan, Aaron, and Blake?

Cady was a nod to suffragist Elizabeth Cady - Cady Elizabeth.

Kyra and Anya are Eastern Euro names but are less grim and formal than Luydmilla, (Luda) or Igor.
Anya is less formal-sounding cause it's a nickname for Anna. Lyudmila has the nickname Lyuda.

In addition to Anna or Anya, some girls' names that pass well in both languages include: Nina, Marina, Tamara, Tanya (technically short for Tatiana), Alexandra (shortens to Sasha), Nora, Aida, Lara, Lina, Tonya, Maria (shortens to Masha).
 
Old 09-28-2012, 09:11 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,678 posts, read 23,284,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Abigail sounds weird to my Russian ear. It would sound more like Ah-bee-gehlj with lj being like the li in million. But it could be nicely shortened to Abi, which is much more palatable to the Russian ear. Christine actually has a Slavic equivalent, Hristina. Though a bit unusual of a name in Russia, it does pull enough on Greek etymology to pass nicely, since Russian borrows heavily from Greek, for names.
I had a feeling about that. That's why I invoked you here! she would most likely be called Abby.

There are Kristina's in Ukraine. Not so in Russia?
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