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Old 09-05-2012, 04:28 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,674 posts, read 23,241,522 times
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Does anyone have a list of resources to help fund international adoption?

We are particularly interested in any organization that helps people regardless of faith - or lack there of.

I am a church member but not a Fundamentalist.
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Old 09-05-2012, 06:21 PM
 
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There are several national chain restaurants which will donate part of the profits from one day of sales to adopting families.

There are the old tried-and-true bake sales, yard sales, lemonade stands, etc. Make sure any advertising states that your sale is in support of adoption, and have a jar for donations with a picture of your child (or a cute label with your child's name) handy.

Ask everyone who ordinarily gives you birthday and/or Christmas presents to donate to your adoption fund. See if you qualify for a Chip-In button. If it's a special needs adoption, you may find organizations which can be helpful. Start an adoption blog, and read those of other families to see what did and didn't work for them. Use your Facebook site similarly. Tell everyone you know whom you think might be remotely interested. That includes kids, who can be very involved and supportive.

Start a jar at home to collect change - it adds up. See if your church might help - maybe they'll allow you to use their facilities for a spaghetti dinner or a pancake breakfast to help bring your child home. Check with your extended family, and see if they can assist you in various ways - perhaps by helping spread the word or donating lightly used children's clothing and/or toys, if they cannot donate or loan you money.
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Old 09-09-2012, 04:31 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,674 posts, read 23,241,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
There are several national chain restaurants which will donate part of the profits from one day of sales to adopting families.

There are the old tried-and-true bake sales, yard sales, lemonade stands, etc. Make sure any advertising states that your sale is in support of adoption, and have a jar for donations with a picture of your child (or a cute label with your child's name) handy.

Ask everyone who ordinarily gives you birthday and/or Christmas presents to donate to your adoption fund. See if you qualify for a Chip-In button. If it's a special needs adoption, you may find organizations which can be helpful. Start an adoption blog, and read those of other families to see what did and didn't work for them. Use your Facebook site similarly. Tell everyone you know whom you think might be remotely interested. That includes kids, who can be very involved and supportive.

Start a jar at home to collect change - it adds up. See if your church might help - maybe they'll allow you to use their facilities for a spaghetti dinner or a pancake breakfast to help bring your child home. Check with your extended family, and see if they can assist you in various ways - perhaps by helping spread the word or donating lightly used children's clothing and/or toys, if they cannot donate or loan you money.
These are all good ideas. Are there any organizations that also assist with adoption funding? I am not referring to a bank loan, which obviously is a possibility.

Agencies love to say extended family as a resource. Not all extended families are so willing and generous.Mine would just say " you already have two kids....why do you need more?"
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Old 09-11-2012, 08:32 PM
 
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If a couple cannot afford to adopt, why would you encourage them to beg?

I'm guessing if a couple told you they needed money for a down payment on a house, you (and most everyone else) would rightly tell them to get another job, budget for their wants, etc.

And who's going to pay for the child's expenses after adoption?
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Old 09-11-2012, 09:17 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Health insurance covers maternity expenses. The birth of my son - a C section, was easily more expensive than mt daughter's adoption.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:07 PM
 
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truebluetwo, please educate yourself about the plight of children who are living in orphanages in the third and developing worlds before criticizing families who want to adopt them but need financial assistance. Adoptive families can care afford to care for children quite readily, once they are home - just as they pay for the expenses of their biological children - or they would not be approved for adoption. But how many families do you know who have $25,000 to $35,000 sitting around, ready to be spent for adoption or any other purpose, for that matter?

No one is asking you to donate, if you are so opposed. So why criticize those who do want to help adoptive families?

I just now have read a horrifying blog entry, written by the new adoptive mother of a tiny, starved little five year old boy just adopted from an eastern European country who was taken to the hospital immediately upon arriving in the U.S. He was dehydrated to the point of near-death, immaciated, and covered with bruises and cuts and scrapes in various stages of healing, many of them quite fresh. This child had received no medical care whatsoever, contrary to the laws of his birth country, since having been transferred from a good "baby house" orphanage to a "children's home" orphanage one year ago at the age of four. The contrast between the pictures of this child taken just as he left the baby house and his current photographs is shocking.

The orphanage to which this little boy was transferred is bright and shiny and looks wonderful - but it is staffed by abusers who know quite well what they do. Recently, parents who are in country have witnessed severe physical abuse of the children - if the abusers are bold enough to abuse with witnesses present, what must the children suffer when no one else is around??

This is not the only child in this condition - another little boy who suffers similar abuse regularly has a newly committed family (who is adopting yet another little boy as well), but it will cost them another $20,000 to rescue him. And it IS rescue, have no doubt. This family is conducting fundraisers, is selling items online, having yard sales, dinners, has been offered matching funds - and yes, other caring, knowledgeable supporters of special needs international adoption have donated to their child's adoption account.

Others raise consciousness as well as funds - another mother just has posted photographs of a thin little seven year old girl in this same place, her little legs black and blue from fist blows and slaps from knee to hip. The little girl only wanted to be held and hugged. This child does not have a family coming for her. There are also indications of likely sexual abuse at this place. This orphanage is reliably reported to have refused all outside help from ngos; even charities based in its country cannot get in. The children surviving there are at the complete mercy of monsters, evidently.

So that's why I help when I can. That's why I advocate, and that's why I tell everyone about things like this, and other horrors that are hard to believe - but all too true.

for those who say we should care for our own first, of course we should care for our own. But if a child is being abused, and we can stop it, does it matter where that child is? Location and nationality are accidents of birth, not cause for some children to be more entitled than others.

Please read the adoption blogs linked to Reece's Rainbow, and look at the faces of the waiting children. Look at the before and after photos, too. It's not a matter of "affording" to adopt - it's a matter of saving lives, and children's lives are priceless.

Once you understand that, how can you criticize anyone who needs help to save a life? How can you oppose anyone who wants to help?
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Old 09-12-2012, 02:38 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Health insurance covers maternity expenses. The birth of my son - a C section, was easily more expensive than mt daughter's adoption.
That may be true, but if you'd given the thousands to your daughter's mother--instead of agencies and attorneys--she'd have been able to have raise her own child.

And that doesn't answer the question about potential adopters begging for money. If I want something, I save money to buy it. What about your friends getting PT jobs? A friend of mine needed a new car so she got a cashier job at Target (in addition to her FT job) to help with the purchase. And adopters end up getting a kickback from the government as it is...

I'm offended by a couple not resourceful enough to figure out how to pay for their own wants but want to guilt others into paying for it.

Last edited by truebluetwo; 09-12-2012 at 02:58 AM..
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Old 09-12-2012, 05:18 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
25,906 posts, read 36,330,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by truebluetwo View Post
I'm offended by a couple not resourceful enough to figure out how to pay for their own wants but want to guilt others into paying for it.
You have made your point. Like any charity fundraiser, participation is voluntary. If your friend was raising money for St. Jude's or UNICEF, would you get "offended" and lecture him or her about it? Probably not.
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Old 09-12-2012, 07:18 AM
 
1,014 posts, read 986,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
You have made your point. Like any charity fundraiser, participation is voluntary. If your friend was raising money for St. Jude's or UNICEF, would you get "offended" and lecture him or her about it? Probably not.
JustJulia,

I also find it problematic when money is raised to support adopters, rather than for resources/solutions to the problems that lead to so many children suffering to begin with. Adopting a child from another country is not the same as raising money for St. Judes. Adoptees are people, not charity cases.

Last edited by JustJulia; 09-12-2012 at 07:23 AM.. Reason: DM me with questions (TOS is in my signature line), thanks
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Old 09-12-2012, 07:19 AM
 
9,193 posts, read 9,271,792 times
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Quote:
That may be true, but if you'd given the thousands to your daughter's mother--instead of agencies and attorneys--she'd have been able to have raise her own child.
I don't know what your point is in making this comment No one I know of who wants to adopt is going to one day get up and go "why don't I just forget about adoption and give my money to poor women". Virtually everyone I know who plans to adopt has two goals they are trying to accomplish:

1. Build a family they cannot build because of infertility.
2. Help a child out.

If you make adoption difficult or impossible (which it is becoming) you aren't going to be doing either poor children or their mothers any favors. Want to know what we would have done with our money if we hadn't been able to adopt? We'd have probably spent in on things like foreign travel. I'd probably buy a new car every six years, instead of every eight years. I wouldn't spend it on unreliable Third World charities. So, in other words, those groups would get next to nothing anyway.

I don't apologize for my "lack of charity". I'm very charitable with my family and my friends. I pay a large and honest income tax every year. Perhaps, people in the Third World derive some small benefit from my taxes. There is no way to know.

But the point is this notion that adoptive parents should simply be willing to part with the hard earned dollars simply to provide general charity to the poor is never going to fly.



Quote:
And that doesn't answer the question about potential adopters begging for money. If I want something, I save money to buy it. What about your friends getting PT jobs? A friend of mine needed a new car so she got a cashier job at Target (in addition to her FT job) to help with the purchase. And adopters end up getting a kickback from the government as it is...
My wife and I paid all the expenses for our two domestic adoptions and they weren't cheap. We did take all government tax credits. I'm grateful. They were very helpful. I know other people (including one birth mother) who chose to adopt internationally who raised money for this purpose. I don't blame people who do it to try to offset expenses. Its a choice. People can give to folks like this or to the March of Dimes or to the American Heart Association. Its a free country and they can do what they want with their money.

Quote:
I'm offended by a couple not resourceful enough to figure out how to pay for their own wants but want to guilt others into paying for it.
I'm offended by someone who labels prospective adoptive parents as "adopters". Some people here may not be aware of it. However, I've been in other forums and I know enough to know that its a pejorative (look it up) term that used by people who oppose adoption to try to demean us and reduce us to something less than the parents of OUR children.

People have a right to choose how to spend their money. If people want to contribute a few dollars to Sheena or anyone else, its their right to do so. If you don't like it, tough. Don't contribute. Easy solution right?
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