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Old 09-13-2012, 09:09 PM
 
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What are the criteria when selecting families to match with a child?

I know what it says on paper. But in reality what are they looking for? If two families are being considered and one has more parenting experience or connections with other adoptive/foster families, who would be given preference? What if both families are potential matches but one is more financially well off?

All things being equal what gives one family the edge over another?

How does matching work with international adoption?
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Old 09-13-2012, 09:32 PM
 
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There is no uniform matching in international adoption, it differs by country.

In some cases the agency chooses, in some the prospective parent is shown several children and chooses, in some countries the government has a system for choosing.
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Old 09-13-2012, 09:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winterbird View Post
What are the criteria when selecting families to match with a child?

I know what it says on paper. But in reality what are they looking for? If two families are being considered and one has more parenting experience or connections with other adoptive/foster families, who would be given preference? What if both families are potential matches but one is more financially well off?

All things being equal what gives one family the edge over another?

How does matching work with international adoption?
Some reading matter about foster care adoption:

NACAC | How to Adopt
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Old 09-13-2012, 10:26 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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There is not any single way a referral is given. A referral - when a prospective family is sometimes assigned a child, as we were the first time around. We requested a daughter because we already had a son. No effort is made to match you physically.

In the case of older child adoption, it can go in a number of ways. One can get a referral. Select a child from a waiting child list. (many countries do not allow pictures to be made public until rather late in the process) or a family can host and then decide to adopt a child. Or the family can travel to the country when their paper work is done and they will be shown profiles of available children.
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Old 09-13-2012, 10:30 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winterbird View Post
What are the criteria when selecting families to match with a child?

I know what it says on paper. But in reality what are they looking for? If two families are being considered and one has more parenting experience or connections with other adoptive/foster families, who would be given preference? What if both families are potential matches but one is more financially well off?

All things being equal what gives one family the edge over another?

How does matching work with international adoption?

By "the edge" what do you mean? Some parents are open to different types of abilities or differences. the agencies listen to what you are open to. No one has to adopt a child with whom they do not feel a connection.
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Old 09-14-2012, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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personally I think it is where you end up on a list. Luck of the draw. If you can't be reached the day referral calls are made, they go to the next name on the list.
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Old 09-14-2012, 11:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
personally I think it is where you end up on a list. Luck of the draw. If you can't be reached the day referral calls are made, they go to the next name on the list.
This depends on the country. There are some countries where the parents meet several children and choose one, this is how we adopted our son. Some countries do not allow or recognize referrals.
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Old 09-14-2012, 11:26 AM
 
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thanks for the replies all.
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Old 09-14-2012, 11:56 AM
 
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In some countries, such as Ukraine, those who learn about a child from others in advance (such as other adoptive parents who may have met the child during their own adoption travel, or ministries or NGOs which advocate for children with special needs) may request to see that child's records in the government adoption authority in the country's capitol city) before traveling to meet the child. The records usually include a photo or photos, which may or may not be current, health information, which may or may not be accurate, and perhaps a little about the child's biological family and reasons that the child was placed for adoption.

Most families who adopt in Ukraine, as in many other eastern European countries, hire a "facilitator", who translates, helps cope with red tape, makes hotel and/or apartment reservations, handles transportation, locates restaurants and grocerry stores, etc. It is legally possible to adopt completely independently of facilitators in Ukraine, but it would be extremely difficult for most American couples (only married couples can adopt from Ukraine at present).

Some families specify that they are interested in adopting a child or children of a particular gender and age range, but then go through the listings of children before committing to meeting the child - this is termed "blind adoption". Getting a referral to meet the child does not equate with agreeing to adopt the child in most countries, as the listing may be inaccurate and the child may not be as described, or other issues may arise. If this happens, the usual procedure is for the would-be adoptive parents to return to the capitol city and try to get a second appointment in order to meet with another available child or children who may be a better "fit". It may take time to get a second appointment - usually an extra week or two.

However, if all goes well and the potential adoptive parents accept the first child or children they meet, the complete procedure takes around a month to six weeks in Ukraine, barring national holidays or unexpected closures of the adoption ministry in the capitol.

After a successful adoption court in Ukraine, parents must wait another ten days to see if any of the child's biological family comes forward to object. Some parents choose to go home during this time, while other remain in-country, visiting their child, who remains in the orphanage or more rarely, foster home. After this waiting period, the child may leave the orphanage in the custody of the adoptive parents, who must provide all clothing and other items (toys, grooming essentials, etc) for their child at this point. Then the in-country paper chase begins - it usually takes about a week to get it all done, including a few final days in Kiev (in Ukraine, of course), so the family can come home with their child. If the adoptive parents are US citizens, their child becomes a citizen as soon as they reach US soil. More red tape awaits at customs, and afterwards, but the difficult work of paper-chasing is almost done at this point, and the real adventure begins.

Usually, a home study will authorize families to adopt a child or children of a certain age range, gender, special need, etc, depending on the family's wishes, size, age range and gender of children already family members, income, ability to provide care for specific special needs, and so on. As noted, this varies from country to country. It's wise to have a rather open-ended home study as far as age range, number of children (there have been cases of previously unidentified siblings to a child who fits the PAP's preferences), special needs, and gender are concerned, to ensure that you will be viewed as good potential adoptive parents to as wide a range of options as possible, if you are adopting internationally. A good social worker will understand this, and help you keep your options broad rather than narrow.

Last edited by CraigCreek; 09-14-2012 at 12:17 PM..
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Old 09-18-2012, 09:51 AM
 
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I should add that in Ukraine, only one parent is required to return to take custody of the child after the ten-day waiting period, which is often beneficial to families with small children at home or other situations which would make it difficult for both parents to travel twice or remain in-country. Many parents choose to have one parent go home, while another adult family member or good friend joins the remaining parent to help with the child's transition. Especially if the child or children being adopted have special needs, it is helpful to have two adults (or perhaps an older teenage sibling) to offer an extra pair of hands during this busy time.
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