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Old 09-18-2012, 03:43 PM
 
5,368 posts, read 5,130,686 times
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Are there any other white people out there that were adopted by non-white parents or just one non-white parent?

I am curious about this subject because I was adopted by a non-white man who my mother married shortly after my birth. After 25 years of life I see now how completely rare that situation is, though you often see white parents adopting non-white children. I did not meet my biological father until I was 19.

To those of you who have been in a similar situation as I, how did your bonding go with your adoptive parents/parent and did race play a role in your bonding with your parent/parents?

I was never able to bond with my adoptive father. A few years back I even paid a judge to return my name back to my mother's father's last name because I just never looked at the hispanic man my mother married (and is now divorced to) as a father. We were just too different in terms of hobbies, interests, values, and yes, color. I think people want to try to downplay the role that race plays in adoption, when it is a very real thing that can create very unique troubles for both the parents and children in the situation. At one time in my child hood I was even calling my adoptive father very racist names in retaliation to his discipline. This of course quickly landed me in a shrinks office for the entirety of 5th grade.

Today, I keep a cordial relationship with my adoptive father. We talk every few months or so. He knows I no longer share his name and he didn't ask why I changed it when I told him. His response was merely a "well, I am sure you have your reasons".

Anyone else out there adopted by non-white parents? Or are there any non-white parents out there that have adopted white children? Has race played any role in the connection you have with your children? Would you advise interracial adoption to other prospective parents?
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Old 09-18-2012, 04:03 PM
 
1,879 posts, read 1,855,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Are there any other white people out there that were adopted by non-white parents or just one non-white parent?

I am curious about this subject because I was adopted by a non-white man who my mother married shortly after my birth. After 25 years of life I see now how completely rare that situation is, though you often see white parents adopting non-white children. I did not meet my biological father until I was 19.

To those of you who have been in a similar situation as I, how did your bonding go with your adoptive parents/parent and did race play a role in your bonding with your parent/parents?

I was never able to bond with my adoptive father. A few years back I even paid a judge to return my name back to my mother's father's last name because I just never looked at the hispanic man my mother married (and is now divorced to) as a father. We were just too different in terms of hobbies, interests, values, and yes, color. I think people want to try to downplay the role that race plays in adoption, when it is a very real thing that can create very unique troubles for both the parents and children in the situation. At one time in my child hood I was even calling my adoptive father very racist names in retaliation to his discipline. This of course quickly landed me in a shrinks office for the entirety of 5th grade.

Today, I keep a cordial relationship with my adoptive father. We talk every few months or so. He knows I no longer share his name and he didn't ask why I changed it when I told him. His response was merely a "well, I am sure you have your reasons".

Anyone else out there adopted by non-white parents? Or are there any non-white parents out there that have adopted white children? Has race played any role in the connection you have with your children? Would you advise interracial adoption to other prospective parents?

Hi, I know an AA poster on adoption.com adopted a CC son.

Also, I have read some articles by a CC lady who is now in her 40s or 50s who was adopted by a Japanese-American couple. I'll have a look and see if I can find our more. I believe she has a wonderful relationship with her parents.
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:16 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,596,155 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by susankate View Post
Hi, I know an AA poster on adoption.com adopted a CC son.

Also, I have read some articles by a CC lady who is now in her 40s or 50s who was adopted by a Japanese-American couple. I'll have a look and see if I can find our more. I believe she has a wonderful relationship with her parents.
What does CC mean?
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,474 posts, read 43,574,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
What does CC mean?
Certified Caucasian? Chalk-like Caucasian? Certainly Caucasian? i dunno and wondered too.
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:43 PM
 
Location: The Chatterdome in La La Land, CaliFUNia
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I am white/Caucasian who was adopted and raised by a black/African-American family.
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Old 09-18-2012, 07:01 PM
 
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CC stands for caucasian.
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Old 09-18-2012, 07:21 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,586 posts, read 23,126,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneTraveler View Post
Are there any other white people out there that were adopted by non-white parents or just one non-white parent?

I am curious about this subject because I was adopted by a non-white man who my mother married shortly after my birth. After 25 years of life I see now how completely rare that situation is, though you often see white parents adopting non-white children. I did not meet my biological father until I was 19.

To those of you who have been in a similar situation as I, how did your bonding go with your adoptive parents/parent and did race play a role in your bonding with your parent/parents?

I was never able to bond with my adoptive father. A few years back I even paid a judge to return my name back to my mother's father's last name because I just never looked at the hispanic man my mother married (and is now divorced to) as a father. We were just too different in terms of hobbies, interests, values, and yes, color. I think people want to try to downplay the role that race plays in adoption, when it is a very real thing that can create very unique troubles for both the parents and children in the situation. At one time in my child hood I was even calling my adoptive father very racist names in retaliation to his discipline. This of course quickly landed me in a shrinks office for the entirety of 5th grade.

Today, I keep a cordial relationship with my adoptive father. We talk every few months or so. He knows I no longer share his name and he didn't ask why I changed it when I told him. His response was merely a "well, I am sure you have your reasons".

Anyone else out there adopted by non-white parents? Or are there any non-white parents out there that have adopted white children? Has race played any role in the connection you have with your children? Would you advise interracial adoption to other prospective parents?
Interesting topic. I know of one. A teen my teens age. One parent is bi-racial and the other AA. There are no problems. Only love!
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Old 09-18-2012, 08:53 PM
 
5,368 posts, read 5,130,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chatteress View Post
I am white/Caucasian who was adopted and raised by a black/African-American family.
Did you ever feel like the racial difference between you and your parents created barriers?
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Old 09-18-2012, 08:57 PM
 
5,368 posts, read 5,130,686 times
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Two posters so far have stated that they knew of other white children who were adopted by non-white families and that the family 'seemed' full of love, but I would rather get first hand accounts. Often, from the outside looking in there seems to be no problems. That is what so many would have guessed while watching my adoptive father and I when I was young. But the problems were very much there......
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Old 09-18-2012, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Fort Bend County
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I've always seen it the other way around...
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