U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting > Adoption
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-17-2013, 10:50 AM
 
11,151 posts, read 14,114,566 times
Reputation: 18795

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
I have never seen anyone post that adopted children are more likely to be abused, what I have seen, and indeed what I have posted myself, is that when you control for all the predictors that negative correlate with abuse, adopted children are more likely to be abused.

So adopted children ARE more likely to be abused? Sorry -- not being argumentative, just confused about what you're saying .....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-17-2013, 12:13 PM
 
393 posts, read 503,407 times
Reputation: 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linmora View Post
I'm glad to see additional data indicating that adoption abuse isn't prevalent in adoptive families. Any type of abuse of course is a terrible thing and I do agree that improvements need to be made in the overall screening process. Reading through the reports puts my mind at ease. Going to give that longer report a more detailed look when I have some time. Really interesting breakdown by states.

Artful Dodger brings up a good point from the report. "Keep in mind that those identified as adoptive parents, will also include step parent / second parent / kinship adoptions in addition to stranger adoptions which is more of the make up of this board."

I agree. Each adoption situation can be radically different. I think that many of us fall into that stranger adoption group and it would be interesting to further break down abuse cases by types of adoption, especially international ones. I would be curious to see the statistics.

I know that a few of the folks on this board believe otherwise---adoption abuse is higher than biological families. I don't think those opinions can be changed and people are certainly entitled to their beliefs. No amount of discussion will change those beliefs.
Linmora - what I haven't figured out from that report is math that is beyond my tired brain right now (old dog at home been up since 2 am and just spelling is hard enough at the moment and forming sentences) is the following and hopefully someone awake can do the math.

How to figure out the following: If 0.7% of the overall perpetrators are adoptive parents (all types and I doubt we could break it down futher) and children adopted account for 2.5% of all children under the age of 18 in the US (abused an not abused) - compared to 99.3% of other types of parents/perpetrators of 97.5% of the non adopted children who were abused. What would the percent of adoptive parents work out to be perpetrators in the year 2011. My brain is trying to tell me the math would be different...I think...but would need the population numbers of all children under the age of 18 in the US to do this.

I may very well be confused because of the fatality statistics in the original article I linked to in Slate which uses per 100,000 kids (not the maltreatment stats above that are perpetrators) - comparing all Russian adoptee deaths between 1991 and 2011...

Quote:
Indeed, even the 19 Russian-born children who died while in the care of their adoptive parents are a tiny minority of the 60,000 Russian children who have been adopted in the United States since 1991. Using this number, the death rate of Russian adoptees is 1.5 per 100,000 per year. By comparison, the general child fatality rate due to neglect and abuse has hovered around 2.2 deaths per 100,000 children per year over the past few years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
1,105 posts, read 2,896,900 times
Reputation: 2106
Quote:
Originally Posted by MirrenC View Post

If more regulation of people doing home studies (as in, they should not be done online: they should require a visit to the home, etc.)
What? Home studies are done online without a visit to the home? I thought interview and a visit to the home was what a home study was.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 01:14 PM
 
125 posts, read 131,394 times
Reputation: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizita View Post
What? Home studies are done online without a visit to the home? I thought interview and a visit to the home was what a home study was.
Exactly! It should be a regulated process. I have heard of shady processes. I cannot speak to having had any done; I am a parent by giving birth. I did some online research just now and found some companies that promise to have it all done in a day, and say that it is okay to be counseled over the phone, or via e-mail. How can psychological evaluation be done via e-mail? That doesn't sound right.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 01:24 PM
 
1,516 posts, read 1,840,067 times
Reputation: 3121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark of the Moon View Post
So adopted children ARE more likely to be abused? Sorry -- not being argumentative, just confused about what you're saying .....
That is exactly what she is trying to imply from her paper napkin analysis. Without actual numbers, it is merely speculation in my opinion which is fine. Everyone is entitled to have them but don't try to pass it along as fact when they are not.

I will say that several folks seem to have amnesia in what they said or implied about the higher abuse rates in adoptive families. Love to see this myth dispelled. It is quite gratifying.

Last edited by Siggy20; 01-17-2013 at 01:44 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 01:35 PM
 
1,516 posts, read 1,840,067 times
Reputation: 3121
Quote:
Originally Posted by MirrenC View Post
Exactly! It should be a regulated process. I have heard of shady processes. I cannot speak to having had any done; I am a parent by giving birth. I did some online research just now and found some companies that promise to have it all done in a day, and say that it is okay to be counseled over the phone, or via e-mail. How can psychological evaluation be done via e-mail? That doesn't sound right.
I'm sure that there are shady agencies out there that promise all kinds of things over the internet. Not coming to the home though?. Not sure about that. For something interesting to do, call one of these companies and ask if everything can be done over the phone. If they seem shady, report them. What you see on a website advertisement my be misleading though and who knows if they are even legit.

I wouldn't start a panic attack quite yet MirrenC although I do agree about regulating the process along the lines of that Washington report.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 02:04 PM
 
1,851 posts, read 2,980,069 times
Reputation: 2365
Quote:
Originally Posted by MirrenC View Post
Exactly! It should be a regulated process. I have heard of shady processes. I cannot speak to having had any done; I am a parent by giving birth. I did some online research just now and found some companies that promise to have it all done in a day, and say that it is okay to be counseled over the phone, or via e-mail. How can psychological evaluation be done via e-mail? That doesn't sound right.
I don't know that these are legitimate. A lot of companies promise things online just to attract clients. Homestudy's do not need to be done by the state, private companies can perform them, but the state has to approve the homestudy and the agency completing it.

Another point, a psychological evaluation is not always done. They do not always need to be done, and if one is ordered, it won't be done via e-mail.

MirrenC, you stated that your birthparent did not want to raise you and married a man who, even as an adult, does not care for you and is verbally abusive to you. But then you also state that you cannot say for sure what type of home you would have been in had you not been adopted out or if abuse would have occured with your biological mother. Given the facts of the situation you now have, it seems your birthparent was thinking of your best interest when she adopted you out, and her decision proved right.

Even though many here feel I am "new" to the adoption process - by their own false assumptions - I actually am not. Not by a long shot. I will be a new adoptive parent, but that is different than being new to the process. The protocols in place are man-made and as such will always fall short of being foolproof and without incident. Is this acceptable? No. Is it inevitable, Yes. We should always work towards making the process better but I think it is important to recognize our limitations.

Last edited by Jaded; 01-17-2013 at 02:14 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 02:06 PM
 
125 posts, read 131,394 times
Reputation: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linmora View Post
I'm sure that there are shady agencies out there that promise all kinds of things over the internet. Not coming to the home though?. Not sure about that. For something interesting to do, call one of these companies and ask if everything can be done over the phone. If they seem shady, report them. What you see on a website advertisement my be misleading though and who knows if they are even legit.

I wouldn't start a panic attack quite yet MirrenC although I do agree about regulating the process along the lines of that Washington report.
I am not starting a panic! Goodness. Just saying that I believe that there is good reason, as the Washington Commission report states, to have more regulation of those doing home studies. I am sure that many people on the Internet advertise things that are highly illegal. I think its disgusting that they prey on potential adoptive parents who may want and easy way to being passed. I am not a regulator; I have better things to do than to call agencies on the Internet and report them.

But I do believe in reform.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 02:21 PM
 
125 posts, read 131,394 times
Reputation: 110
See, for example, in the Commission Report (p. 13):

"Under current law, qualifications to conduct an adoption home study or post placement report require that a person have a master's degree in social work or a related field and one year of experience in social work, or a bachelor's degree and two years of experience in social work, or a person not having such qualifications if the court makes specific findings that the person has reasonably equivalent experience. There are no requirements for the supervision of individuals conducting adoption home studies.

Discussions with the work group as well as during meetings with child placing agencies revealed concerns about the lack of sufficient education, training or experience of some individuals conducting adoption home studies and post placement reports. The work group also stressed the clinical skills and professional judgment necessary to assess a prospective adoptive parent and properly complete a home study. Particularly troubling to some committee members were accounts of unlicensed, independent 'home study providers.' Although the final home study is reviewed by the court, these independent providers are not subject to either state or private agency supervision or oversight."

This is what is troubling to the people of the commission, and to me, personally. It may not bother people here, but it seems to me that not having people with the proper degrees and experience to judge whether prospective adoptive parents are suitable, or a home is safe, may lead to placing a child in home where he or she is vulnerable to abuse. If there is no regulation of home study providers, anyone can do it; it's about money, not child safety. That is wrong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2013, 02:44 PM
 
1,516 posts, read 1,840,067 times
Reputation: 3121
Quote:
Originally Posted by MirrenC View Post
See, for example, in the Commission Report (p. 13):

"Under current law, qualifications to conduct an adoption home study or post placement report require that a person have a master's degree in social work or a related field and one year of experience in social work, or a bachelor's degree and two years of experience in social work, or a person not having such qualifications if the court makes specific findings that the person has reasonably equivalent experience. There are no requirements for the supervision of individuals conducting adoption home studies.

Discussions with the work group as well as during meetings with child placing agencies revealed concerns about the lack of sufficient education, training or experience of some individuals conducting adoption home studies and post placement reports. The work group also stressed the clinical skills and professional judgment necessary to assess a prospective adoptive parent and properly complete a home study. Particularly troubling to some committee members were accounts of unlicensed, independent 'home study providers.' Although the final home study is reviewed by the court, these independent providers are not subject to either state or private agency supervision or oversight."

This is what is troubling to the people of the commission, and to me, personally. It may not bother people here, but it seems to me that not having people with the proper degrees and experience to judge whether prospective adoptive parents are suitable, or a home is safe, may lead to placing a child in home where he or she is vulnerable to abuse. If there is no regulation of home study providers, anyone can do it; it's about money, not child safety. That is wrong.
No one is arguing with you about tightening up the home study process. I think that all of us are in agreement with the Washington report and the recommendation within. I think that is does "bother people here" if some unqualified person is conducting a home study. If a fly by night agency is doing home studies, then that is certainly a flaw in the process. How often does this happen? Don't know but the commission identified this as a loophole that needs to be fixed.

It is interesting that even though the courts review the packets, the home study providers aren't subjected to oversight. This would seem to be an easy thing to remedy as part of a legal document check. When we adopted our kids both in Russia and readoption in the United States, the court was very picky about our submissions. Not sure why there isn't a centralized database of certified home study providers that court could check against.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting > Adoption
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:13 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top