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Old 01-15-2013, 02:02 PM
 
509 posts, read 484,157 times
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Mod Note: The following posts are split off from a non-related thread, so that this issue can be discussed on its own merits.



Adopted children are more likely to be abused than biological children (see recent Washington State investigation- I can't look up the link now). The whole reason for all the homestudies and paperwork PAPs must go through is to protect the best interests of the child, not the PAPs. The fact that this process is flawed and sometimes fails does not change its intent or purpose; it simply means we must improve it and make it better.

Last edited by Green Irish Eyes; 01-16-2013 at 09:13 AM..
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Old 01-15-2013, 06:33 PM
 
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Default Abuse of Adopted Children

Quote:
Originally Posted by tiffjoy View Post

Adopted children are more likely to be abused than biological children (see recent Washington State investigation- I can't look up the link now). The whole reason for all the homestudies and paperwork PAPs must go through is to protect the best interests of the child, not the PAPs. The fact that this process is flawed and sometimes fails does not change its intent or purpose; it simply means we must improve it and make it better.
The abuse issue is always there, and it breaks my heart. It's been proved, over and over, that's its easier for people to abuse those who don't share our blood. It doesn't mean that it will happen; just that the likelihood is greater. And children are so vulnerable. Thank you again.

Last edited by Green Irish Eyes; 01-16-2013 at 09:19 AM..
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Old 01-15-2013, 06:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiffjoy View Post
As for the "few sickos," well, I don't care how few they are. It's unacceptable. Adopted children are more likely to be abused than biological children (see recent Washington State investigation- I can't look up the link now).


Here it is: SEVERE ABUSE OF ADOPTED CHILDREN COMMITTEE REPORT
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Old 01-15-2013, 06:53 PM
 
509 posts, read 484,157 times
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Originally Posted by Dark of the Moon View Post
Thank you!
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Old 01-15-2013, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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I'm sorry I haven't read the entire thread but I have a question and comment about the topic of abused adopted children.

Isn't it possible that any parent who would abuse a child would do so whether it was adopted or biological? Maybe the only way they could have a child was through adoption so that is the child who is abused. Who is to say this same parent wouldn't have abused a child who came to them biologically.
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Old 01-15-2013, 09:39 PM
 
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Default Exactly

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Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I'm sorry I haven't read the entire thread but I have a question and comment about the topic of abused adopted children.

Isn't it possible that any parent who would abuse a child would do so whether it was adopted or biological? Maybe the only way they could have a child was through adoption so that is the child who is abused. Who is to say this same parent wouldn't have abused a child who came to them biologically.
Thank you.
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Old 01-16-2013, 01:50 AM
 
125 posts, read 131,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I'm sorry I haven't read the entire thread but I have a question and comment about the topic of abused adopted children.

Isn't it possible that any parent who would abuse a child would do so whether it was adopted or biological? Maybe the only way they could have a child was through adoption so that is the child who is abused. Who is to say this same parent wouldn't have abused a child who came to them biologically.
Perhaps true for some families, not true for others.

See, for example, Doug and Kristen Barbour (he was Deputy Attorney General of Pennsylvania), who severely assaulted and abused two children from Ethiopia but who also had two biological children.

Pa. deputy attorney general, wife charged with abuse of children - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

They are being allowed supervised visits with their biological children, aged two and four, who were/are not abused, are of healthy weights.

The case study in the report that Dark posted, as well, mentions the death of a 13-year-old international adoptee who was killed (see p. 1) when the parents had seven biological children who were not abused.

There is probably greater risk of a person being abusive in general, as you say, but there are also too many cases in which adoptive parents feel that they can take out their anger specifically on adoptees, as scapegoats. It's terrible, disgusting, and wrong. Something needs to be done to stop this.

Last edited by MirrenC; 01-16-2013 at 02:03 AM.. Reason: clarity
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Old 01-16-2013, 06:53 AM
 
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Okay folks, I really have to comment on this one. I think that several of you probably need to reread this Washington report since some erroneous statements are being made for the sake of arguing. The title is a bit misleading---"Severe Abuse of Adopted Children." If one had not read the report, it would be easy to jump to the conclusion that adopted children are often abused. I would probably retitle it since it really does address some problems in adoption including a bit of adoption reform that that is discussed quite frequently on these boards. The report was excellent...well balanced in my opinion. I think that the work group did an excellent job and I would support all of their recommendations. They are looking out for the interests of the children. They are also very sensitive to adoptive families and getting them support. It also discusses the homestudy process which I found most enlightening. 100% agree with what they are recommending.

A few things, I keep seeing references made to this report stating that adopted children are much more likely to be abused. Let me direct you to page 6: "Are abuse and neglect, including withholding food, on the rise, and are they more prevalent in adoptive families?"

Finding: Generally, adoption is a protective factor with respect to child abuse and neglect. The work group is not aware of specific studies that address the prevalence of starvation and serious abuse and neglect of adopted children. Cases of serious starvation are actually quite rare. However, the potential for abuse and neglect increases when an adoptive family is ill prepared and/or ill matched with a child who suffers froom unidentified and/or untreated trauma, abuse and/or neglect.

Again this is reiterated in page 8. "Rates of abuse are not elevated for adoptive families compared to biological famiilies. Instead, it seems the highest risk of abuse is with the presence of a step-parent."

Again, please reread this report. It is quite comphrensive and I would suspect that many adoptive parents would concur with what the report is saying. I certainly am all in favor of having better support for adoptive parents. The report nails it. Some adoptive famiilies are very ill prepared to deal with a host of issues. I can speak from experience on this one parenting a child with significant issues. It is VERY tough and I'm glad to see this report addressing these issues.

Last edited by Siggy20; 01-16-2013 at 07:05 AM..
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Old 01-16-2013, 07:21 AM
 
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Linmora - I get you confused with Lizita so I could be wrong. Weren't we discussing this report on another thread?

I am so pleased that Washington looked into the spike in cases and found serious flaws in the laws/rules for homestudies. I hope they implement them yesterday.

Abuse in any home is unacceptable - I do think the outrage is stronger when it happens in an adoptive family because the checks and balances are supposed to catch the problems and ensure they don't happen. Also, part of the outrage is also due to the refusal (past or present) of having an open discussion that abuse does happen in adoptive families - because no one in the community wants to taint "adoption" - understandable but wrong to be concerned about public perception of adoption for lack of addressing the process that broke down. Too many things in adoption have been swept under the rug to protect "adoption" from being tainted. Does that make sense?
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Old 01-16-2013, 08:53 AM
 
1,516 posts, read 1,846,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artful Dodger View Post
Linmora - I get you confused with Lizita so I could be wrong. Weren't we discussing this report on another thread?

I am so pleased that Washington looked into the spike in cases and found serious flaws in the laws/rules for homestudies. I hope they implement them yesterday.

Abuse in any home is unacceptable - I do think the outrage is stronger when it happens in an adoptive family because the checks and balances are supposed to catch the problems and ensure they don't happen. Also, part of the outrage is also due to the refusal (past or present) of having an open discussion that abuse does happen in adoptive families - because no one in the community wants to taint "adoption" - understandable but wrong to be concerned about public perception of adoption for lack of addressing the process that broke down. Too many things in adoption have been swept under the rug to protect "adoption" from being tainted. Does that make sense?
I wasn't discussing this report on another thread. In fact, just sat down and read it with my first cup of coffee this morning. I was curious to see if abuse indeed was more common in adoptive families. I'm relieved to see that this isn't the case according to this particular report. I so often see this thrown around in adoption discussions. If other reports point to this fact, I would be interested in seeing the link so that I could read the report.

Not sure if I understand your last comment about adoption issues being swept under the rug. These well publicized cases have brought the fact that abuse does happen. It is a reality in every family, adoptive or biological. The adoption cases though get the most scrutiny. I guess that I'm a realist and understood that when we adopted, it wouldn't be all sunshine and butterflies. I was an active participant on other adoption forums and went into our adoption with our eyes very much open. There were numerous parents having great challenges, especially in an international adoption. We pretty much realized that healthy children were in short supply and there would be issues. I guess that where I was surprised was confronting the reality of bringing a child home and suddenly confronting those issues when the child is all yours. You are in for a tough reality check when it actually happens to you. I could tell you stories that would make you shudder. In retrospect, it has taken quite a few years to reach a diagnosis for our daughter (reactive attachment disorder albeit a milder case). That is where I would have loved to have more adoption support. Aside from some other adoptive parents, my husband and I felt very alone. I think that this Washington study, if implemented, would help families quite a bit. In our case, the good news is that things are slowly improving.

I agree that abuse in any form is horrible. Adoptive families are indeed under a microscope if something horrible happens on their watch. It is easy (and justified) to be quite angry that the adoptive parents weren't vetted by the system. Frankly, I don't understand the severe abuse cases (linked on this thread). How parents could do that is beyond my comphrension and really has no explanation. Were there red flags that should have stopped the adoption process? Or did these parents just wack out and do some inexcusable things? I would be really curious. On the other hand, the Washington report does give a big nod to adoptive families and acknowledges that most adoptions are of a proactive nature. That, at least, is good news.

Last edited by Siggy20; 01-16-2013 at 09:07 AM..
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