U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting > Adoption
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-12-2015, 11:48 AM
 
7,317 posts, read 11,482,643 times
Reputation: 8106

Advertisements

Hi,

Does anybody know what generally happens to children after they have been abandoned by their parents? And how common this is the US?

I would like to help, does anybody know what the state(s) do to help these children when they are taken from their parents and what is a good way to help?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-12-2015, 12:10 PM
 
6,393 posts, read 1,270,617 times
Reputation: 16228
Based on personal experience about 20 years ago here in Colorado when we applied to foster/adopt, in most cases, county social workers try to reunite the kids with their parents and also try to help the parents. If that doesn't work, they then try to find relatives who are willing and able to take the children; and if that doesn't work, the kids are put into foster care until either their parents can get their act together or their parents' rights are terminated, either voluntarily or involuntarily (at which point the kids are available for adoption).

Check with your local Social Services department for ways in which you can help.

And thank you for caring enough to ask about this!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Austin
676 posts, read 488,802 times
Reputation: 911
Every state has their own structures and guidelines, as well as their own family codes which define what is and isn't abuse ... but there are federal guidelines and expectations with dollars attached to them which cause for a great deal of similarity.

Basically it depends on how a child comes into the CPS system, but generally, while it is unsafe for a child to be with parents, or while parents have abandoned a child we will first try to find fmaily members who are able to pass background checks and are willing and able to care for the children. Those who don't go to foster homes. We try to work with the families to address and solve the issues that led to the intervention.

If parents do either lose their rights, or just choose to give them up, then the state will work to try and get the children adopted. We look first for familiy who is appropriate, safe and able, then for "fictive kin" (people not technically family, but with long-term relationship with the child or family - it could be a family friend, a teacher, whatever), then only as a last resort we would look to non-related family.

How could you become involved? You could become a licensed forster home or foster/adopt home who took these children in and loved on them while it is needed. You could look to adopt. If you have a college degree you could look to work in the system, either for a foster agency, CPS in your state, or some other social work agency who reaches out to children in need.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 09:36 AM
 
7,317 posts, read 11,482,643 times
Reputation: 8106
Well, my degree is engineering, so that might not work so well. It sounds like rewarding work, but life has taken me away from that path.

Being a sole foster parent might be a bit of a stretch at this point. Perhaps a big brother mentor type thing might work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2015, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Austin
676 posts, read 488,802 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobaba View Post
Well, my degree is engineering, so that might not work so well. It sounds like rewarding work, but life has taken me away from that path.

Being a sole foster parent might be a bit of a stretch at this point. Perhaps a big brother mentor type thing might work.
We're all different, but you never know where life will take you. 4 or so years ago I was a project manager for oil and gas, making a killing. Now I find myself as a social worker. My bank ballance might groan sometimes, but I don't regret it for a second, I love the work I do.

In any case, something that you might find rewarding is to look into CASA. "Court Appointed Special Advocates." Most states have/utilize them, basically you go through a little bit of training (evenings/weekends, and not all that much), and then when the court grants temporary custody of a child or sibbling group to the state, they will often/usually also appoint CASA as a guardian ad litem. Basically they are that "big brother" who is there to make sure that the children's needs are being met and they are being treated right, and you develop a mentor/big brother relationship with them through that.

I know alot of people who find it very rewarding use of their time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2015, 10:14 AM
 
7,317 posts, read 11,482,643 times
Reputation: 8106
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddATX View Post
We're all different, but you never know where life will take you. 4 or so years ago I was a project manager for oil and gas, making a killing. Now I find myself as a social worker. My bank ballance might groan sometimes, but I don't regret it for a second, I love the work I do.

In any case, something that you might find rewarding is to look into CASA. "Court Appointed Special Advocates." Most states have/utilize them, basically you go through a little bit of training (evenings/weekends, and not all that much), and then when the court grants temporary custody of a child or sibbling group to the state, they will often/usually also appoint CASA as a guardian ad litem. Basically they are that "big brother" who is there to make sure that the children's needs are being met and they are being treated right, and you develop a mentor/big brother relationship with them through that.

I know alot of people who find it very rewarding use of their time.
Very cool man, very cool.

Thanks a lot!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2015, 06:42 AM
 
10,171 posts, read 7,032,473 times
Reputation: 23927
Casa might be ideal for you! Go to an informations session. I did think of it but didn't go through win it because I didn't think I was going to be able to stomach some of the abuse. But it's a great program
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2015, 07:05 AM
 
Location: East TX
2,090 posts, read 2,013,587 times
Reputation: 3188
Court Appointed Special Advocates are always in demand and always appreciated by the foster families. Far too many cases land in a courtroom and the only person in the room that knows more than the kids name and age is the foster parent(s) and they can feel like they are ignored/not valued in the process. The CASA can be a huge help to ensure that the children's interests are represented accurately and fairly.

I also wouldn't rule out being a foster parent. Even as a single person it can be a possibility and could change more than one life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2015, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Austin
676 posts, read 488,802 times
Reputation: 911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rynldsbr View Post
Court Appointed Special Advocates are always in demand and always appreciated by the foster families. Far too many cases land in a courtroom and the only person in the room that knows more than the kids name and age is the foster parent(s) and they can feel like they are ignored/not valued in the process. The CASA can be a huge help to ensure that the children's interests are represented accurately and fairly.

I also wouldn't rule out being a foster parent. Even as a single person it can be a possibility and could change more than one life.
It's rare for CPS caseworkers to "not know more than the name and age of the kids". I was a caseworker for over 3 years, and I still have kids from that entire time who call me weekly or more, who I go visit regularly or take out for dinner. Most caseworkers are like that. There are bad apples, like there are anywhere in society, but the vast majority of CPS workers are very dedicated and work hard to both get to know the kids and make sure their needs are being met. However, that being said ... when a caseworker has 25-35 kids on his caseload, it is hard (especially in the short term) to develop the kind of relationship that a CASA can with them where the CASA has only one child or sibbling group.

I still work for CPS, but I no longer work as a caseworker, I work now with our older youth (15-16+) in helping them plan for adulthood, get into college, we provide benefits for them (including free college tuition), provide life skills training and mentorship, college workshops and tours, summer camps and programs, job development skills, and other things to try and help them be successful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2015, 01:04 PM
 
10,171 posts, read 7,032,473 times
Reputation: 23927
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddATX View Post
It's rare for CPS caseworkers to "not know more than the name and age of the kids". I was a caseworker for over 3 years, and I still have kids from that entire time who call me weekly or more, who I go visit regularly or take out for dinner. Most caseworkers are like that. There are bad apples, like there are anywhere in society, but the vast majority of CPS workers are very dedicated and work hard to both get to know the kids and make sure their needs are being met. However, that being said ... when a caseworker has 25-35 kids on his caseload, it is hard (especially in the short term) to develop the kind of relationship that a CASA can with them where the CASA has only one child or sibbling group.

I still work for CPS, but I no longer work as a caseworker, I work now with our older youth (15-16+) in helping them plan for adulthood, get into college, we provide benefits for them (including free college tuition), provide life skills training and mentorship, college workshops and tours, summer camps and programs, job development skills, and other things to try and help them be successful.
Depends on where you live. I did some freelance work for DFS and noticed quickly that the caseworkers didn't even really know the kids who were there case or not. It was a mess. But we have one of the worst programs in the US
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Parenting > Adoption
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:16 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top