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Old 03-15-2019, 01:30 PM
 
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Foreign adoptions to US fall by 14 per cent, continuing trend
March 14, 2019

NEW YORK — The number of foreign children adopted by U.S. parents plunged nearly 14 per cent last year, extending a decline that’s now continued for 14 years, according to State Department figures released Thursday.

Sharp drops in adoptions from China and Ethiopia more than offset notable increases from India and Colombia.

The department’s report for the 2018 fiscal year shows 4,059 adoptions from abroad, down from 4,714 in 2017 and 82 per cent below the high of 22,884 in 2004. The number has fallen every year since then.

China, as has been the case for several years, accounted for the most children adopted in the U.S. But its total of 1,475 was down 22 per cent from 2017 and far below a peak of 7,903 in 2005.

Suzanne Lawrence, the State Department’s special adviser on children’s issues, said the steady decrease in adoptions from China was linked to an improved Chinese economy and the expansion of domestic adoption there. She also said U.S. adoption agencies were hampered by China’s laws restricting activities by foreign nongovernmental organizations.

Adoptions from Ethiopia dropped sharply to 177, down from 313 in 2017 when it was No. 2 on the list. Ethiopia imposed a ban on foreign adoptions last year, citing concerns about the well-being of its adopted children and improprieties by foreign adoption agencies.

Adoptions from impoverished Haiti, which is trying to establish a domestic foster care program, dropped from 227 to 196.

India accounted for the biggest increase, with adoptions to the U.S. rising from 221 to 302. Adoptions from Colombia rose from 181 to 229. Lawrence said the State Department had developed strong relationships with child-welfare authorities in both countries.

For a fourth straight year, there were no adoptions from Russia, which once accounted for hundreds of U.S. adoptions annually but imposed a ban that fully took effect in 2014. The ban served as retaliation for a U.S. law targeting alleged Russian human-rights violators.

According to the new report, 81 children were adopted from the United States to nine foreign countries, including 38 to Canada and 20 to the Netherlands.

Along with the updated statistics, the State Department summarized concerns about shortcomings on the part of U.S. adoption agencies. One persisting problem is failure to comply with requirements by foreign governments to regularly submit post-adoption reports on the welfare of the adopted children.

Also of concern are cases in which children adopted from abroad are transferred from one U.S. home to another without authorization from child-welfare authorities. There also have been troubling cases where adoptive parents in the U.S., without authorization, have sought to return adopted children to their country of origin.

International adoptions have been declining worldwide in recent years. The United States accounts for about half of all foreign adoptions, including large numbers of children with special medical and psychological needs.

However, the National Council for Adoption and many of the adoption agencies it represents have faulted the State Department for failing to reverse the decline in foreign adoptions.

“Every year nothing changes, except that fewer children receive a loving, nurturing family through intercountry adoption,” said Chuck Johnson, the council’s president and CEO. “Orphaned, abandoned and vulnerable children around the world are counting on the U.S. to do better, and the State Department should re-evaluate what it’s doing, appoint people who can more effectively carry out this important mission and work more collaboratively with the U.S. adoption community.”



https://theprovince.com/pmn/news-pmn...5-51731d32d54d
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Old 03-26-2019, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
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If you make something more and more expensive and more and more difficult, you are likely to get less and less of that thing. That, right there, is the main reason that inter-country adoptions are on a steady downward trajectory.
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Old 03-30-2019, 03:19 PM
 
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Also, about 10-15 years ago it was very popular (especially with families from certain religious groups) to adopt from China. In fact, many mommy bloggers chronicled their journeys doing so that honestly it became a bit of a fad. Chinese adoptions, because they were so expensive, became a status symbol compared to adopting children from other countries.

However, now there is backlash that these white religious families have kept their children from their culture of origin. There are even adult adoptees that now greatly resent their adoptive parents. It's an interesting shift.
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Old 03-30-2019, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
5,589 posts, read 3,580,699 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradomom22 View Post
Also, about 10-15 years ago it was very popular (especially with families from certain religious groups) to adopt from China. In fact, many mommy bloggers chronicled their journeys doing so that honestly it became a bit of a fad. Chinese adoptions, because they were so expensive, became a status symbol compared to adopting children from other countries.

However, now there is backlash that these white religious families have kept their children from their culture of origin. There are even adult adoptees that now greatly resent their adoptive parents. It's an interesting shift.
That's a rather broad brush you're painting with here. Do you have anything more than anecdotal evidence to support this claim?
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Old 03-30-2019, 09:31 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
If you make something more and more expensive and more and more difficult, you are likely to get less and less of that thing. That, right there, is the main reason that inter-country adoptions are on a steady downward trajectory.
Exactly.

The closing of Russia, Russia, which was the largest mostly European country to permit the adoption of children internationally, closed. By and large, most children available for adoption from Russia are Caucasian. There is a segment of the US, Canadian and European populations who want to adopt children who look like themselves. Russia had the largest amount of Caucasian children in need of homes.

Russia's reason for closing had more to do with politics and Russia's eternal desire to look "tough" and to save face, than with any of the insinuations of the original poster.

Statistically, more children are neglected or mistreated by their biological parents, than by their parents through adoption. That is not my opinion. It is a fact.

As stated by bus man, the cost of international adoption has risen dramatically, as of late.

When we adopted our daughter from Korea in 1996, the adoption process cost us less than $12,000. The same adoption today with the same agency with cost at least double that. Perhaps more.

To be clear, that is the price of the ADOPTION not of the child.

If people had to pay the entire cost of a pregnancy and delivery of a biological child up front, I have no doubt that people would have fewer biological children. They would also exercise more discretion when having sexual relations outside of marriage and committed relationships.

I am in a sound position to compare the two. Giving birth to my son in 1994 involved a C-section, an epidural and a five day hospital stay, cost much more than the adoption of our daughter.

I can not defend or explain the adoption agencies' choice to raise fees to the extent that they did, any more than I can explain Russia's choice to close inter-country adoptions, which was initially directed towards the United States.

Ukraine, for reasons that I find unfathomable, appears to be sending more children in need of homes into Foster Care, and copying the United States' terribly flawed model. Since adoption is socially frowned upon and not as excepted in Eastern Europe, the foster children are sadly used as house hold workers or agricultural hands. There is little pretense that they will ever become "part of the family". Most are homeless when they turn of age and the government checks stop.

The sad thing about all of this, is that children remain wear housed in overseas orphanages, living on the streets and in need of families. The amount of children needing homes in developing countries has not gone down.

The quantity of parents able to afford inter-country adoptions, has; by virtue is it's cost, become limited.

Right now, the Bulgaria adoption program is healthy and quite popular. Bulgarian adoptions are more straightforward that those in Russia and Ukraine. Costs of the adoption are still expensive, for most middle class families though. Obviously, Bulgaria is a much smaller country than Russia, so the numbers will never reach those of Russia adoptions.

The interest in adoption in the US, has not diminished. The ability to afford the adoption has made them less frequent.

Again, the children are the victims in all of this.
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Old 03-30-2019, 09:51 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,547 posts, read 23,045,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradomom22 View Post
Also, about 10-15 years ago it was very popular (especially with families from certain religious groups) to adopt from China. In fact, many mommy bloggers chronicled their journeys doing so that honestly it became a bit of a fad. Chinese adoptions, because they were so expensive, became a status symbol compared to adopting children from other countries.

However, now there is backlash that these white religious families have kept their children from their culture of origin. There are even adult adoptees that now greatly resent their adoptive parents. It's an interesting shift.
I don't think that adoption is thought of as a "fad" among families seeking to adopt. There are many reasons why people may choose one country over another, but frankly, calling China adoptions "a status symbol" is somewhat offensive.

A first cousin of mine is an international attorney and is fluent in at least two Chinese dialects. China was a natural choice for her family.

They adopted two girls from China, one as a baby, and the other as a toddler. One of the girls had a cleft palette, that has since been corrected. The Chinese agency also implied that she had intellectual challenges. That was patently false.

Both girls are in their late teens now. They graduated HS with honors. They speak English, Chinese, Spanish and Japanese. One plays piano, the other violin. Both girls were very involved with sports in HS.

Now that they have graduated from High School, they are students at two venerable and well regarded academic instatutions - Wesleyan University in CT and Mount Holyoke College in MA.

In terms of religious groups adopting children from China, I am not sure I know what religion you were referencing. My cousin is a Presbyterian. Her daughters were raised in that denomination.

Were you speaking about Presbyterians, or some other group?
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