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Old 07-15-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Orange County, N.C.
242 posts, read 162,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
African Americans tend to visit Ghana when they go to W. Africa. The other country that African Americans seem to gravitate to on the continent is South Africa. Going by the ethnic groups that you mentioned, it appears that you were in Nigeria when you visited W. Africa.

That was indeed the case, and, a more charming, hospitable, outgoing group of people I had not met. Judging by the "hospitality to strangers" rule of thumb, they were considerably more civilized than the french, who were positively rude.
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:40 AM
 
14 posts, read 12,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wordlife View Post
I'm curious, how is the view/relations between Native Africans and people of African descent throughout Central/Latin America?

I'm fortunate to have family in W. Africa, Europe, The Caribbean and The States but i've always been interested in the exchanges between Latin America and Africa. I was watching a really fascinating documentary on the Garifuna people in Guatemala not that long ago, and i've often wondered the relations. There's such a huge piece of the diaspora located in that part of the world (especially in Brazil)
I Guess that was at least part of my point. Once you get past how the diaspora happened, there are some really neat things going on in its aftermath and a whole lot to be proud of. Nobody doubts the popularity of Hip Hop; especially among young people. I work in Afghanistan and young people here are all over it. But just think about all that other stuff going on:Salsa, Jazz, Blues, Samba, Gospel, Country Swing, Zydeco, Raggae, and many others. Origins in Africa for sure but there are other effects distinct to the diapora that made this form of music pop - to the extent that western black music is the esperanto music of the world [including Africa] these days.

When I lived in the UK, I used to hang out in Brixton on weekends and you would see people walking around with Afro-Saxon tee shirts on. I've never been to South America but there is plenty of video footage going on about it, especially in countries like Brazil with thick heavy black cultures. And I was watching something a couple of years ago about Afro-Mexicans. This history goes back to at least the 1300s with a list that just goes on and on. And as the world gets smaller, we keep turning up in some of the most interesting places. My point is that it is a heritage in and of itself - and it is up to the decendants of those who experienced it to find value in it. After all this time, it should be obvious that no one is going to do this for us. But we can do it for ourselves.
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Old 07-23-2012, 01:09 PM
 
986 posts, read 2,202,634 times
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Arrow あふりか

This might be of interest.

I guess Africans on the continent are much more aware of their differences instead of having a sense of unity, much less a PanAfrican one.
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Old 07-24-2012, 12:01 PM
 
Location: the Outer Limits
3,948 posts, read 2,728,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brri View Post
Most Black Americans/Carribeans/Brazilians are descendants of slaves of white taskmasters. Most native Africans are descendants of "slaves" to European colonizers. Both were involved in the struggle to gain political freedom and economic independance. Many within both communities have been left behind under the weight of a non-progressive lower class. Both groups tend to be mainly judged according to their lower class and not the significant strides which they have made overall.
Has ANYBODY ever read this article Born into Bondage | People & Places | Smithsonian Magazine it just seems to be overlooked by everyone and I have posted the link many times. NO ONE ever comments.....LOL. I guess they don't like the message.

Quote:
Born into Bondage
Quote:

Despite denials by government officials, slavery remains a way of life in the African nation of Niger

  • By Paul Raffaele
  • Smithsonian magazine, September 2005, Subscribe

View More Photos »
In the Nigerian village of Tajaé, a woman named Rakany (with her great-grandson) says she was given as a slave to her owner when she was an infant. She is now 80 years old.
Paul Raffaele



Photo Gallery
[IMG]http://media.smithsonianmag.com/images/76*49/bondage_man.jpg[/IMG]Born into Bondage

Explore more photos from the story



More from Smithsonian.com Lightning and thunder split the Saharan night. In northern Niger, heavy rain and wind smashed into the commodious goatskin tent of a Tuareg tribesman named Tafan and his family, snapping a tent pole and tumbling the tent to the ground.



Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/people...#ixzz21Z3iRdX7
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:50 AM
 
Location: America
6,655 posts, read 10,333,368 times
Reputation: 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neutre View Post
This might be of interest.

I guess Africans on the continent are much more aware of their differences instead of having a sense of unity, much less a PanAfrican one.
Again, trying to paint all africans with one brush just wont due. Some are very aware of their tie to one another and others are black anglo saxons for a lack of a better word. But people like yourself, trying to tell Africans what they are or are not is a figment of your imagination, and less a reality of what is going on, on the continent.
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:51 AM
 
Location: America
6,655 posts, read 10,333,368 times
Reputation: 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post
Has ANYBODY ever read this article Born into Bondage | People & Places | Smithsonian Magazine it just seems to be overlooked by everyone and I have posted the link many times. NO ONE ever comments.....LOL. I guess they don't like the message.

[color=#000000][b]
Have you, yourself been to Niger?
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:52 AM
 
Location: America
6,655 posts, read 10,333,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Budke View Post
From my experience, native Africans aren't big on African Americans. When I worked in Iraq there were a lot of Ugandans subcontracted to guard a lot of buildings and whatnot. They would often refer to African Americans as "Fake Africans" and then laugh at them.

It was hilarious.
As a African, I can say without reservation you are a liar.
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Old 07-30-2012, 09:06 AM
 
1,570 posts, read 1,515,699 times
Reputation: 2017
Quote:
Originally Posted by DginnWonder View Post
This has been a question I have been wondering for a while. How do Africans view people of African descent around the world? I wonder how countries that were directly involved in the slave trade (Nigeria, Ghana, Angola) think especially.

I know in Jamaica, the US, France, and Brazil there is a ral affinity with "the Motherland." The general view of Africa is the typical fair: A hellhole. But for American Blacks, it also has a mysticism and real interest. I wonder what the other side is thinking...

I'm not African-American. However, I do have African ancestors and rightfully consider myself one third African. So, given what I consider myself, and the fact that I did set foot in Mombasa Kenya many years ago, by default, I will consider myself qualified to respond to your query.

I was a mere 20 year old U.S. Navy Sailor when I found myself at sea in the Indian Ocean. Because we had been at sea for 36 consecutive days, our ship was starting to run low on fuel and essential supplies. The closest friendly port was Mombasa. As soon as permission was granted, our ship headed in that direction. Initially, no one knew exactly where we were headed. But, as soon as the word got out, there was this feeling of absolute elation amongst those of us of African-American descent and myself. Although many of my African-American shipmates didn't know I had African blood in me, I was sure to let them know how proud and fortunate I felt, and how our elation was mutual. We'd smile at each other in a curious sort of way. We were on our way to the proverbial Motherland; the land of our Ancestors and the very craddle of humanity.

Unfortunately, immediately upon arrival, my division was tasked with the critical responsibility of taking on fuel. This kept our group aboard an extra 12 hours. The next day I finally set foot on the pier. I purposely took a very deep breath and walked into town with a group of guys from my division. We were granted early liberty given the prior day's 12 hour ordeal. I was a bit surprised at the number of foreigners I saw and British accents I heard. But nevertheless, I knew where I was. I knew that the air in my lungs and the soil beneath my feet was African. I was there. I had arrived at that far away place frequently alluded to by my father and my father's father.

"Yambo, yambo. . .hey brader, we same color!" I'll never forget the words of a statue and efigy vendor I met. Both he and I were all smiles. He (of course) smiled to sell his wares. I smiled simply because it felt good to hear those words coming from a native Kenyan. Although I was a few shades lighter, I felt so proud to hear that man call me brother, and tell me that we were of the same color. I offered him a Camel cigarrette which he kindly accepted. As we smoked, I analyzed several of his hand carved figures. I was truly impressed with the craftsmanship and bought two intricately carved masks and two 8 inch tall figurines, all made from dense mahogany.

We spent a total of six days in Mombasa and I felt gifted by God himself for this unforgettable experience. Sadly, several of my African-American shipmates did not faire as well. Many were shunned by the native Kenyans. Despite that, I am sure that a certain void in our souls was made whole. That curious void found deep in my sub-conscious was finally satisfied. I can proudly say that I've set foot on African soil.
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Old 08-02-2012, 05:07 PM
 
Location: the Outer Limits
3,948 posts, read 2,728,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Style View Post
Have you, yourself been to Niger?
what difference does that make ?
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Old 08-03-2012, 09:52 AM
 
Location: America
6,655 posts, read 10,333,368 times
Reputation: 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post
what difference does that make ?
I can talk about the social landscape in Mobile Alabama until I am blue in the face. If I have not been there to see it myself, its just unsubstantiated supposition.
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