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Old 12-08-2014, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
Saw a movie called I, Afrikaner today. One of the whites, having just killed a jackal to protect his small livestock, remarked that this animal is the only creature in Africa more trouble some than the black. These comments were made within the last year or two.
I haven't seen this movie. But, is that supposed to be a reflection of the character in this movie? I mean, I assume they are projecting this person to be the kind of person who would say this type of thing?

Or is this a documentary?
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I haven't seen this movie. But, is that supposed to be a reflection of the character in this movie? I mean, I assume they are projecting this person to be the kind of person who would say this type of thing?

Or is this a documentary?

This is a documentary made by an Afrikaner over a 9 year period. The film was built around her family and the social contexts that they operated in. It covered 4 generations.

I actually found the most overtly racist generation to be the young adult one (30s-40s).

The older ones seemed more reconciled to the fact that the world had changed and that they just needed to hide from it and retire in peace. Their main concern seemed to be around a well justified fear of crime, which also concerned the black villagers and farm workers as well.

I guess this is because the younger whites who grew up under apartheid, and so assumed that the system of white privilege would remain, became angered when suddenly majority black rule came and they were forced to accommodate the demands of the blacks.

The youngest "adult", a 17 y/o girl, embraced the changes. She had many African friends, loved dancing to black African music, spoke fluent Sotho, and frequently went into a black village on her own. The presumption was that this girl, born in 1997, therefore spending her entire life going to mixed race schools, would have seen life differently from her parents, They who, raised in apartheid, but then as young adults, having to deal with a world where the rules had changed, had an active resentment for the changes that a post apartheid world had brought.

An interesting conversation was between the film maker and her brother. She asked him whether some sort of land sharing arrangement (making some of the land available for use by the local blacks) mightn't reduce some of the resentment, and presumable black violence. He didn't seem to understand that some sort of redress for the blacks to take into account the evils of the apartheid era was in his best interests.

Despite what the white South African(s) post on this thread, their country still has a way to go to address the legacy of racism. The fact that a YUPPIE black group can now mix with their white peers, a sign of progress for sure, isn't sufficient to then claim that all is well. Because these are not AVERAGE South Africans.


The reaction of many white South Africans to the legacy of apartheid, and to demands by blacks for greater socio economic inclusion, is so much like the conversation which is occurring in the USA. The USA itself still hasn't addressed its own legacy of Jim Crow (de facto and de jure).
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Old 12-09-2014, 03:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by caribny View Post
Despite what the white South African(s) post on this thread, their country still has a way to go to address the legacy of racism. The fact that a YUPPIE black group can now mix with their white peers, a sign of progress for sure, isn't sufficient to then claim that all is well. Because these are not AVERAGE South Africans.
Again, still not denying that there is still lots to be done

Although at this rate the country is likely to collapse before then >.< My hatred for Eskom and SANRAL is at an all time high at the moment... For anyone in the dark (pun intended ) we're having rolling blackouts pretty much everyday at the moment because Eskom can't generate enough power for the country. Blackouts range between 4 and 10 hours at a time.

On a side note and kinda related to the topic, I'm sharing this link because I always enjoy me some Trevor Noah


Jon Stewart and Trevor Noah Compare Racism in America Versus Africa
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Old 12-10-2014, 07:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by caribny View Post
When humans lose power they react like this. Not just whites.


I remember an Indian in the UK who was very involved in the anti racism struggle there in the 80s. this because he as a South Asian was on the receiving end of it.

I spoke to him about the situation of the Dalits in India, thinking that he would be sympathetic, as they face similar discrimination. His attitude changed and he spoke scathingly of them and declared that social order determines that they remain where they are. He had nothing positive to say about attempts in India to reduce bigotry shown towards Dalits.

Within an Indian context he had power, whereas in the UK he didn't.

I can well imagine in South Africa the most extreme bigotry will come from the lower middle class and poorer Afrikaners as we see in the USA from the "red necks". All they had to privilege themselves was race, and when discrimination towards others was no longer LEGALLY sanctioned, and when a middle class of non whites emerged, these groups feel strangely "wronged" and think the phenomenon to be unfair.

Interesting point. I would imagine if the Nazis hadn't lost there would be Germans saying things like "I don't understand what the big deal was in the 30s and 40s life seemed great". The ability of the "Human Race" to just divorce themselves of reality and accept dehumanization as the norm really puts in perspective the "Stanford Prisoner" study.
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Old 12-10-2014, 10:39 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,942,608 times
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Originally Posted by dowsieboi View Post
Again, still not denying that there is still lots to be done

Although at this rate the country is likely to collapse before then >.< My hatred for Eskom and SANRAL is at an all time high at the moment... For anyone in the dark (pun intended ) we're having rolling blackouts pretty much everyday at the moment because Eskom can't generate enough power for the country. Blackouts range between 4 and 10 hours at a time.

On a side note and kinda related to the topic, I'm sharing this link because I always enjoy me some Trevor Noah


Jon Stewart and Trevor Noah Compare Racism in America Versus Africa

I know he is a comedian because clearly there is vastly more destitution among blacks in South Africa than there is among black Americans in the USA. NYC is also unique with its bad highways within the USA.

I am also curious about the source of inter racial income inequality in South Africa when one considers that South Africa is one of the most unequal nations on this planet, with a high correlation between race and income and wealth. Does some one really attach much credibility to statistics about race in the apartheid era, when a major focus of the regime at the time was to trivialize the naked injustice connected to that odious system?

Being defensive doesn't solve the very real problems that Africa as a whole has, with many South Africans not much better off. I get his point that Africa is negatively portrayed, when it isn't ignored, but then Africa doesn't make a good case for itself. Compared to the rest of the world Africa is at the bottom, using most metrics to define social and economic condition. The poverty gap between Africa (including North Africa) and the Latin American/Caribbean region has soared over the past 50 years.

Case in point, your Eskom problem. Not unusual in sub Saharan Africa. With the possible exception of Haiti I think that most countries on this side of the Atlantic have greatly improved the energy supply situation over the past decade or so.

Infectious disease still a problem in most of Africa. Lifestyle diseases are now the problem in Latin America and the Caribbean. Were Haiti on the African continent, it wouldn't be as unique in its poverty as it is within Latin America and the Caribbean.
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