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Old 12-27-2012, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,281,369 times
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Given the population of the continent, there are probably dozens if not hundreds of people in Africa who possess the intellectual potential to become a chess grand master. Only a tiny few ever have the opportunity to become exposed to the game, and of those who do learn to play chess, it is not surprising that there is one capable of playing world-class level chess. After all, somebody has to be the best chess player in Africa, and as I suggested earlier, it is condescending to be surprised that that somebody is pretty good. How many kids are potentially just as good as Phiona, but never knew about the game?

And, not everyone who knows the game and plays well decided to pursue that as a career. I played against a German Grand Master, for whom chess was only third on his list priorities. First he went to medical school and became a doctor, then won a number of tennis tournaments, and finally a Chess Grand Master.
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Old 12-27-2012, 01:53 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Politically correct, indeed
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Old 12-27-2012, 03:53 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,149 posts, read 23,676,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Given the population of the continent, there are probably dozens if not hundreds of people in Africa who possess the intellectual potential to become a chess grand master. Only a tiny few ever have the opportunity to become exposed to the game, and of those who do learn to play chess, it is not surprising that there is one capable of playing world-class level chess. After all, somebody has to be the best chess player in Africa, and as I suggested earlier, it is condescending to be surprised that that somebody is pretty good. How many kids are potentially just as good as Phiona, but never knew about the game?

And, not everyone who knows the game and plays well decided to pursue that as a career. I played against a German Grand Master, for whom chess was only third on his list priorities. First he went to medical school and became a doctor, then won a number of tennis tournaments, and finally a Chess Grand Master.
What direction do you really want to go with this? It all seems like nowheresville.

The kid has had a hard life and happened upon something great for her. The story is pretty unique and it does not have to be condescending. Stop being an old crank for just a second and appreciate that.
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Old 12-27-2012, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,281,369 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
What direction do you really want to go with this? It all seems like nowheresville.

The kid has had a hard life and happened upon something great for her. The story is pretty unique and it does not have to be condescending. Stop being an old crank for just a second and appreciate that.
I responded because I thought there was an implication that we should be surprised that an African is smart. I've said what I had to say. 53% of elementary-age children in Uganda are enrolled in school, which is about average for sub-Saharan Africa. So, probably nearly all reasonably bright kids are exposed to education there. Going to school is not special or unique.

There is a heart-warming news story available every day in Africa, where gifted people are unselfishly accomplishing all sorts of things -- and the media pats itself on the back if they do one every couple of years. Ameriscot could probably tell us about a dozen of them, just in Uganda. But the media prefers to let us think Africa is a black hole, with an occasional flicker of light.

Instead, the media just accepts advertising dollars from aid corporations who show pictures of barefoot African children and threatened baby animals on TV. The worse off we think they are, the more ad revenue for the networks -- hence the editorial policy. Follow the money.

Last edited by jtur88; 12-27-2012 at 04:33 PM..
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Old 12-27-2012, 04:15 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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I am not surprised than an African is smart, but that for instance Africans play chess in the first place and that we actually learn about it. I don't associate chess with sub-Saharan Africa. It is simply not what we are used to hearing about that continent in the West...
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Old 01-14-2013, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Fortaleza, Brazil
2,572 posts, read 4,656,135 times
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Wow, great news...

I think chess is a very important way to develop the minds of school children, and it's not expensive at all.

Every country, specially those that don't have too many financial resources, should stimulate the teaching of chess in the schools. Here in the Northeast of Brazil, that is the less wealthy region of Brazil, many schools are already introducing chess classes to the kids.

I hope chess becomes more widespread in the schools of African countries.

It's also important to have inter-school chess championships.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:42 PM
 
Location: West Coast
1,199 posts, read 2,195,483 times
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Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I am not surprised than an African is smart, but that for instance Africans play chess in the first place and that we actually learn about it. I don't associate chess with sub-Saharan Africa. It is simply not what we are used to hearing about that continent in the West...
Chess originated on the continent of Africa. I am not surprised that you don't know this.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:45 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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As far as I know Chess was developed in China, from where it spread via Iran to the West...
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Old 01-15-2013, 12:19 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
Chess originated on the continent of Africa. I am not surprised that you don't know this.
I am not surprised that no one knows that since it's actually not true.
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Old 01-15-2013, 07:22 PM
 
5,239 posts, read 6,764,665 times
Reputation: 11326
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I responded because I thought there was an implication that we should be surprised that an African is smart. I've said what I had to say. 53% of elementary-age children in Uganda are enrolled in school, which is about average for sub-Saharan Africa. So, probably nearly all reasonably bright kids are exposed to education there. Going to school is not special or unique.

There is a heart-warming news story available every day in Africa, where gifted people are unselfishly accomplishing all sorts of things -- and the media pats itself on the back if they do one every couple of years. Ameriscot could probably tell us about a dozen of them, just in Uganda. But the media prefers to let us think Africa is a black hole, with an occasional flicker of light.

Instead, the media just accepts advertising dollars from aid corporations who show pictures of barefoot African children and threatened baby animals on TV. The worse off we think they are, the more ad revenue for the networks -- hence the editorial policy. Follow the money.
You might be the only one on this forum that thought there was some implication we should be surprised an African is smart. Except for a couple of people that have posted on this forum now and then, I see people here as being positive and interested in Africa.

Bad news sells, that isn't an American media only thing, the very same thing happens world wide. Look at that horrible photo the NY Post ran of the guy caught on the subway tracks in NY city. You don't think African newspapers also highlight primarily the bad? There are heartwarming stories all over the world that no one hears about. The people volunteering, doing good works aren't after getting themselves in the paper. No one brings it to the attention of the media, it goes on unnoticed under their radar. Those that blindly listen and believe whatever they are told without looking further for themselves are simply lazy dolts. Or ya could call them sheeple.

From an interesting article, "The White Correspondent’s Burden, We Need to Tell the Africa Story Differently" from the Boston Review, by Jina Moore. Link to article below, note they ask for an email to send ya infor on their upcoming stories. That will open in another tab, then refresh the news story tab and ya should be able to read it without anything blocking it. Its worth a read. Here are a few quotes;

"Ultimately, the problem with journalism from Africa isn’t about professional conventions. It’s about all of us—writers and readers, producers and viewers."

"The argument about journalism from Africa is often whittled into two camps, Afro-pessimists vs. Afro-optimists. But these binary camps, too, miss that Africa is many complex things, simultaneously. In our news broadcasts and our headlines, though, it’s usually framed by just one static thing: suffering."

"But there is a deeper problem, I think, that has not been sufficiently acknowledged. Since its first encounters with the continent, suffering is all the West has known of Africa. We’ve caused much of it"

"The problem with American news about Africa isn’t foreign writers. It’s the narrow American imagination."

Boston Review — Jina Moore: The White Correspondent’s Burden (Africa, journalism)

Here is another interesting article from Jina Moore.
Good News from Africa › Jina Moore


If only more newspapers were like like this one.
A good news man in Africa - Press - Media - The Independent
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