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Old 01-21-2013, 08:53 PM
 
136 posts, read 180,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by todd00 View Post
You might be the only one on this forum that thought there was some implication we should be surprised an African is smart. Except for a couple of people that have posted on this forum now and then, I see people here as being positive and interested in Africa.

Bad news sells, that isn't an American media only thing, the very same thing happens world wide. Look at that horrible photo the NY Post ran of the guy caught on the subway tracks in NY city. You don't think African newspapers also highlight primarily the bad? There are heartwarming stories all over the world that no one hears about. The people volunteering, doing good works aren't after getting themselves in the paper. No one brings it to the attention of the media, it goes on unnoticed under their radar. Those that blindly listen and believe whatever they are told without looking further for themselves are simply lazy dolts. Or ya could call them sheeple.

From an interesting article, "The White Correspondent’s Burden, We Need to Tell the Africa Story Differently" from the Boston Review, by Jina Moore. Link to article below, note they ask for an email to send ya infor on their upcoming stories. That will open in another tab, then refresh the news story tab and ya should be able to read it without anything blocking it. Its worth a read. Here are a few quotes;

"Ultimately, the problem with journalism from Africa isn’t about professional conventions. It’s about all of us—writers and readers, producers and viewers."

"The argument about journalism from Africa is often whittled into two camps, Afro-pessimists vs. Afro-optimists. But these binary camps, too, miss that Africa is many complex things, simultaneously. In our news broadcasts and our headlines, though, it’s usually framed by just one static thing: suffering."

"But there is a deeper problem, I think, that has not been sufficiently acknowledged. Since its first encounters with the continent, suffering is all the West has known of Africa. We’ve caused much of it"

"The problem with American news about Africa isn’t foreign writers. It’s the narrow American imagination."

Boston Review — Jina Moore: The White Correspondent’s Burden (Africa, journalism)

Here is another interesting article from Jina Moore.
Good News from Africa › Jina Moore


If only more newspapers were like like this one.
A good news man in Africa - Press - Media - The Independent
Thank You. I was having a hard time figuring out how the obligatory "America = bad" message would be introduced into this thread - I mean it's an African girl playing chess. CityData never dissapoints.
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:19 AM
 
5,239 posts, read 6,763,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevike View Post
Thank You. I was having a hard time figuring out how the obligatory "America = bad" message would be introduced into this thread - I mean it's an African girl playing chess. CityData never dissapoints.
I mentioned the article as someone commented that one never hears the good news only the bad news from Africa. That is why I quoted and recommended the articles. It was relevant to the comment the poster made and in regard to general good news stories coming from the continent. I don't really understand your sensitivity.
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Old 01-22-2013, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Gorgeous Scotland
4,123 posts, read 4,749,366 times
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There is a book about this story called The Queen of Katwe. I am reading it now while I am visiting Uganda. The Katwe slum is the worst in Kampala so that is really dire. I know where the area is but not been in it.

This girl had not attended school and could not read. The kids had never heard of chess until a minister taught them. She happens to be brilliant at it.
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Old 01-22-2013, 04:37 PM
 
Location: the Sun
521 posts, read 635,888 times
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there are tons of smart people in every race. not surprised that an african girl is smart. she is one of many
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Old 01-22-2013, 04:44 PM
 
Location: the Sun
521 posts, read 635,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I know what you mean. Still, fact is, a whole lot of people still consider blacks intellectually inferior, unfortunately. Even on this board you can find such views, especially on the popular politics forum. Thus it is much more interesting to learn about a Ugandan chess player than about yet another Russian player...
they're most likely trolls or just insecure and plain ignorant. as someone who works with the public, and have to talked to hundreds of people everyday, i encounter many many dumb white people by the tenfold who do not listen nor know how to answer simple direct questions on a regular basis. many of them can barely grasp simple concepts it makes my job so harder. honestly, i talk to dumb people of all racial categories all day. i can't say i've seen a pattern with people of color.
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Old 01-22-2013, 05:02 PM
 
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It's a very inspiring article, she seems like such a sweet young lady. I wish her the very best in the future.
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:38 PM
 
2,575 posts, read 4,691,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Isn't it rather condescending, to assume that being African is some kind of a block to becoming a chess grand master? Chess is one of the few human enterprises in which one makes it purely on their own ability, without regard to anything else that ever happens in ones life, and nothing else beside playing chess can help one rise to the top. There is nothing you can do to help a person become a better chess player, except to give him a board and an opponent.
I disagree. My son was a nationally-ranked junior chess player all through junior high and high school, and is now master level. Without a lot of competent teachers and/or access to chess books and computer databases, it's very difficult to become more than a reasonably passable player. Just having an opponent means nothing. I play tennis with a friend and neither of us is making the other a better player, because neither of us is good enough to help the other's play develop.

I think coming from a developing country, it could be harder to have access to the tools - and opponents - that help one learn the game. Russia, in contrast, has an elaborate network of chess competition and education.
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Old 02-08-2013, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,269,803 times
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But it is unlikely that you or your friend could have become tournament-level tennis players, no matter how much competent training, tennis books or databases you were exposed to. Yes, some proper training and guidance will make you a better tennis player or a better chess player, but that is merely refining a talent that must already be present. Nothing will make you a good enough tennis player to win tournaments outside your own tennis club. A million American boys play high school football, competently coached by people who have been trained to coach football, with exposure to all the textbook learning and training procedures, videos and weight rooms, but 999,000 turn out to be used car salesmen with concussions and bad knees. For one out of a thousand, there is something special already there, the raw material of a natural athlete waiting to be polished, and a dozen boys who grew up in Africa are playing in the NFL. Even one from Uganda. Another 23 NBA basketball players were born in Africa.

Somebody has to be the best child chess player in Africa, and it happens at the moment to be Phiona. No doubt she used some hard work and discipline to attain that status, in addition to a natural talent for the game and the opportunity to have learned it in the first place. That doesn't make her a hero, but just the last girl standing. Heroism is a funny thing. Take any American farm boy and give him a gun and a uniform and send him into battle, and if he is in the right place at the right time, he will be decorated with the Medal of Honor. We call children brave because they survive cancer. What was their choice -- to just die?

Last edited by jtur88; 02-08-2013 at 09:34 AM..
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Old 02-08-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,576 posts, read 2,435,663 times
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Good for her and best wishes to her in the future.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I am not surprised than an African is smart, but that for instance Africans play chess in the first place and that we actually learn about it. I don't associate chess with sub-Saharan Africa. It is simply not what we are used to hearing about that continent in the West...
But why wouldn't you think Africans play chess? It's just chess.

At least you are honest about not associating chess with "sub-saharan" africa based on what you hear about "that continent" in the West though. Most of the West is very limited in exposure and education about Africa in general.

But yes, just like anywhere else, there are people who are into chess in African countries and tournaments held. Google chess tournaments and different African countries for more info.
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Old 02-08-2013, 07:40 PM
 
5,239 posts, read 6,763,555 times
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"Heroism is a funny thing. Take any American farm boy and give him a gun and a uniform and send him into battle, and if he is in the right place at the right time, he will be decorated with the Medal of Honor." You make it sound so meaningless. Often its saving other people that gets them medals or other actions in the heat of the moment.

We call children brave because of the strength it takes for anyone, especially a child to deal with the disease. And some do die.

Other children living in similar conditions to that of Phiona might view her as a hero for her extraordinary accomplishments. She is no doubt an inspiration to other children in Africa.
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