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Old 03-30-2013, 06:31 PM
 
Location: West Coast
1,199 posts, read 2,198,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
I'm sorry,I still don't understand.

Beyonce has 2 black parents. Why isn't it silly for her to call herself mixed?

Chili and Tatiana Ali both are dark skinned,but are mixed. Is it silly for them to call themselves mixed?
Sometimes being mixed isn't so obvious.

Are we just basing it on appearance now?
If that's the case,the president doesn't look biracial at all. I see men his complection and hair type everyday,but they have 2 black parents.
I take it you haven't heard? Beyonce is now considered mixed. African American, Native American, and French, according to that Loreal commercial. In 2000 she was Black, in 2013 she is mixed. Funny how that works. Mainstream acceptance has a way of letting Black people transcend their Blackness. I actually do find it silly that Beyonce would cave like that to popular sentiment, but hey, I'm not signing her checks. Chili and Tatiana are mixed, as they have one Black parent, and one non-Black parent. I clearly stated that in my post. The President looks very much biracial.
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Old 03-31-2013, 03:14 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 7 days ago)
 
5,273 posts, read 8,059,639 times
Reputation: 4281
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
I'm sorry,I still don't understand.

Beyonce has 2 black parents. Why isn't it silly for her to call herself mixed?

Chili and Tatiana Ali both are dark skinned,but are mixed. Is it silly for them to call themselves mixed?
Sometimes being mixed isn't so obvious.

Are we just basing it on appearance now?
If that's the case,the president doesn't look biracial at all. I see men his complection and hair type everyday,but they have 2 black parents.
Beyonce herself has said that she is racially mixed and her mother definitely looks mixed (I have never seen a photo of her father.) She doesn't have two black parents, she has a mixed race mother and a father that I don't know what he is (or was.)

She's what people call multigenerational mixed, which is usually applied to people that are visibly mixed but that mixture comes through one or more mixed parent(s) and not an initial mixed (like Obama, who is a first generation mixed.)

I don't see why so many people (mostly in the USA) have such a problem with this. A mixed race person can choose to identify as mixed because that's what they are. From what I can tell, most of them are not self-hating. They are simply stating a fact about themselves.

In much of the world (Africa included), mixed race people are seen as mixed anyway, not black. The USA has been more of an anomaly when it comes to this. A mere 5% of the world's population that has been pretending that mixed race people are black and now that country is catching up to the other 95% of the world that see mixed people as mixed.

Regarding my other post, I didn't meant to say that since the average African American is only 77% African, that they can't consider themselves black. They can call themselves whatever they want, as long that what they are calling themselves is actually in their blood. But if some of them want to feel comfortable with their full heritage and want to not just claim the 77% African part, but also the 23% that is not African; then they should be able to do so with no one getting angry or trying to make them feel bad for simply stating a fact.

In this modern era, people are free to choose their identity or label and if it coincides with what's in their blood, there's not much anyone can do about what anyone decides to call themselves.

Well, that's what I think is the correct and ethical way of treating this. Identity is a personal issue and people's decisions need to be respected when we agree with them but especially when we don't.

As long that mixed people are not denying their black part, I don't see anything wrong with them claiming to be mixed. In fact, I think that would actually help in getting rid of some of the mistrust that still exist between the races in the USA.

For example, in reality Obama is a mixed race man. He decided to identify as black and no one should be angry because of that, because he is part black after all. He has his reasons to feel and identify like that and he is free to do so. However, if he was to identify as mixed, people shouldn't feel angry at him either, because he is as mixed today as he was on the day he was born and there's nothing anyone can do to change that.

If Obama comes out saying he's Asian, I can definitely see a problem with that. LOL

Last edited by AntonioR; 03-31-2013 at 03:25 PM..
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Old 04-01-2013, 02:28 PM
 
61 posts, read 62,983 times
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Most men don't like dark women, if asked who their ideal woman is, they will definitely say a lightskin woman. It seems like its politically correct to say dark is beautiful all while picking partners who are significantly light
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 34,014,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antonio84 View Post
Beyonce herself has said that she is racially mixed and her mother definitely looks mixed (I have never seen a photo of her father.) She doesn't have two black parents, she has a mixed race mother and a father that I don't know what he is (or was.)

She's what people call multigenerational mixed, which is usually applied to people that are visibly mixed but that mixture comes through one or more mixed parent(s) and not an initial mixed (like Obama, who is a first generation mixed.)
Beyonce is from an African American subgroup, the Creoles, of Louisiana, who have been multigenerational mixed for hundreds of years. African, French, Spanish, and Native are the primary ethnic groups from which the Creoles claim heritage. Her father, Mathew, is a dark-skinned man; I am not sure if he is African American or West Indian as I have heard both.


Quote:
I don't see why so many people (mostly in the USA) have such a problem with this. A mixed race person can choose to identify as mixed because that's what they are. From what I can tell, most of them are not self-hating. They are simply stating a fact about themselves.
I am African American and Afro-Latino. I have never had a problem with Black Americans or Black/mixed Latinos claiming their mixed heritage. I do have a problem with two things, though - a person of obvious African heritage who denies this heritage, or a person who pointedly ascribes negative or inferior traits to that which is black or African and applies positive or superior characteristics to that which is European. That I believe is self-hatred, and it is corrosive and mentally damaging not only to those who do it, but also to those of African characteristics who have to put up with that type of thinking.

Quote:

In much of the world (Africa included), mixed race people are seen as mixed anyway, not black. The USA has been more of an anomaly when it comes to this. A mere 5% of the world's population that has been pretending that mixed race people are black and now that country is catching up to the other 95% of the world that see mixed people as mixed.

Regarding my other post, I didn't meant to say that since the average African American is only 77% African, that they can't consider themselves black. They can call themselves whatever they want, as long that what they are calling themselves is actually in their blood. But if some of them want to feel comfortable with their full heritage and want to not just claim the 77% African part, but also the 23% that is not African; then they should be able to do so with no one getting angry or trying to make them feel bad for simply stating a fact.
You are technically correct. But I still find it puzzling when people of obvious African phenotype - i.e., as or more African than I am - call themselves "mixed" or "mulatto" .


Quote:
In this modern era, people are free to choose their identity or label and if it coincides with what's in their blood, there's not much anyone can do about what anyone decides to call themselves.
Yes, but as I said, sometimes this "freedom" gets outrageous.

Quote:
Well, that's what I think is the correct and ethical way of treating this. Identity is a personal issue and people's decisions need to be respected when we agree with them but especially when we don't.

As long that mixed people are not denying their black part, I don't see anything wrong with them claiming to be mixed. In fact, I think that would actually help in getting rid of some of the mistrust that still exist between the races in the USA.
Well, as you can see on C-D, lots of mixed people run as far away from their black heritage as they can. It's as if they are ashamed of the "poisoned" or "cursed" African DNA within them.


Quote:
For example, in reality Obama is a mixed race man. He decided to identify as black and no one should be angry because of that, because he is part black after all. He has his reasons to feel and identify like that and he is free to do so. However, if he was to identify as mixed, people shouldn't feel angry at him either, because he is as mixed today as he was on the day he was born and there's nothing anyone can do to change that.

If Obama comes out saying he's Asian, I can definitely see a problem with that. LOL
Obama does identify as mixed, in that he readily acknowledges his white family. But he is what most Americans, including his own mother and grandparents, see as black. He really had no choice in the matter, imho, but to identify as black.
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:37 AM
 
8,226 posts, read 10,812,245 times
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I'm still asking,how is it obvous to the naked eye that someone has more African genes than someone else?
Esp since one kid could come out light skinned with afro features and one dark skinned with Euro features?

If someone as black as night with blue eyes (I have seen it) and short,ttype 4c hair said they are mixed,why are they looked at skeptically if they said they were mixed?
Well,since Beyonce is considered genrational mixed,why can't Michelle Obama say the same thing? She also was found to have European dna,and has a white cousin in down south. I seen it on Dateline 3 eyars ago.
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Old 04-02-2013, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 34,014,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
I'm still asking,how is it obvous to the naked eye that someone has more African genes than someone else?
Esp since one kid could come out light skinned with afro features and one dark skinned with Euro features?
It's not obvious who is more African than whom. But it is obvious who is African or mixed African.
Quote:

If someone as black as night with blue eyes (I have seen it) and short,ttype 4c hair said they are mixed,why are they looked at skeptically if they said they were mixed?
I don't look at it skeptically. But I also don't consider it a badge of honor.
Quote:

Well,since Beyonce is considered genrational mixed,why can't Michelle Obama say the same thing? She also was found to have European dna,and has a white cousin in down south. I seen it on Dateline 3 eyars ago.
I don't have a problem with someone saying they are mixed. The problem is those people who are obviously of African origins who say they are not black.

And Michelle Obama does not say she is mixed, but she acknowledges that she has white ancestors. Most black folks will tell you that - a lot of them with pride.
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Old 04-02-2013, 09:12 AM
 
1,260 posts, read 1,933,893 times
Reputation: 1302
Are they sure bleaching cream isn't just being used to fade spots? Not everyone uses these cremes to bleach their face to be lighter, a lot of people use them to fade acne marks and scars for a more even skin tone.

Darker skin has more melanin and as a result is more likley to get dark marks. It's actually why darker people don't age as fast as whites.
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Old 04-02-2013, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 34,014,891 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Missingatlanta View Post
Are they sure bleaching cream isn't just being used to fade spots? Not everyone uses these cremes to bleach their face to be lighter, a lot of people use them to fade acne marks and scars for a more even skin tone.
You can kinda tell when they're buying it by the gallon..............those are some huge "spots."
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Old 04-02-2013, 09:51 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 7 days ago)
 
5,273 posts, read 8,059,639 times
Reputation: 4281
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
I'm still asking,how is it obvous to the naked eye that someone has more African genes than someone else?
Esp since one kid could come out light skinned with afro features and one dark skinned with Euro features?

If someone as black as night with blue eyes (I have seen it) and short,ttype 4c hair said they are mixed,why are they looked at skeptically if they said they were mixed?
Well,since Beyonce is considered genrational mixed,why can't Michelle Obama say the same thing? She also was found to have European dna,and has a white cousin in down south. I seen it on Dateline 3 eyars ago.
I was thinking the same thing.

I think it shouldn't be a problem if a mixed person says they are mixed instead of white or black, regardless if the mixed person looks more white, black, ambiguous/conspicuously mixed.

The "questioning" should be like this, especially to those mixed that have more African features but chose to identify as mixed:

Q: Are you black? A: No.

Rather than the questioner jumping to the conclusion that the individual is denying having black blood, he should instead ask:

Q: OK, but do you have black/African blood in you?

If the individual says no (unless he's from India or some other southeast Asian countries where sometimes people have what I call pseudo-African features despite not a drop of African blood), then its clear that person suffers from self-hate. A mixed person with heavy African feature should not cause alarm if that person says they are not black, but mixed; they should cause alarm if they deny having black blood in them, because the answer to the second question should always be yes in the case of those partially admixed with African blood.
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Old 04-02-2013, 10:02 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 7 days ago)
 
5,273 posts, read 8,059,639 times
Reputation: 4281
Ingrown hair also produces large dark spots on some people's skin. I don't think women get much ingrown hair on their face, but many men certainly do, including those of mixed heritage. The one's that are light skin probably get large dark spots that with time goes away. It would be horrible if people start to judge them on the assumption that they are bleaching, when the large dark spot could had been caused by a ingrown hair. At least its temporary, though.

I think the biggest tell tale sign that someone is bleaching as oppose to being naturally light skin, is if there's a marked difference in color in certain areas, such as on the knuckles, around the edge of the nails, in various parts of the ears, along the hairline, and other areas that should be difficult to artificially lighten or even out.
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