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Old 01-05-2013, 06:10 PM
 
Location: West Coast
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How is the Spanish spoken in Equatorial Guinea different from That spoken in Europe, South America or Latin America? Is a creole version? If different, what are common words or phrases.
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Old 01-05-2013, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Here are some samples. Judge for yourself.

Reportaje Televisión Nacional de Guinea Ecuatorial Jordan Mba Parte 1.wmv - YouTube

Ambassador Discusses Equatorial Guinea's Native Languages - YouTube

Guinea Ecuatorial - Justo Bolekia Boleká: Poemas en bubi/español - YouTube
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Old 01-05-2013, 09:32 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
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It reminds me of Spanish spoken in parts of the Caribbean.
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Old 01-05-2013, 09:37 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
How is the Spanish spoken in Equatorial Guinea different from That spoken in Europe, South America or Latin America? Is a creole version? If different, what are common words or phrases.
Equatoguinean Spanish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

According to the article, while African influences could have an effect on Spanish spoken in Equatorial Guinea, another factor could also be the dialect of Spanish spoken by colonizers.

http://www.personal.psu.edu/jml34/egs.pdf

http://www.personal.psu.edu/jml34/egt.pdf
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Old 01-05-2013, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Eastlake Park, PHX
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Wow, that's cool! I speak Spanish and I never even knew that place existed!
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Old 01-05-2013, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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It should be pointed out that (as far as I know) there is no African country where a European language is spoken exclusively. In every country, at least one African language is still widely spoken, especially by uneducated people, even in the capital. In many African countries, the language of the European colonials is spoken only in cases where people in the conversation come from two different tribal language groups and have no other common language.
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:37 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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A lot more like Castilian than Caribbean dialects!
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Old 02-11-2013, 02:36 AM
 
Location: La Isla Encanta, Puerto Rico
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
It should be pointed out that (as far as I know) there is no African country where a European language is spoken exclusively. In every country, at least one African language is still widely spoken, especially by uneducated people, even in the capital. In many African countries, the language of the European colonials is spoken only in cases where people in the conversation come from two different tribal language groups and have no other common language.
I read somewhere that Cape Verde had very few natives and all were killed/de-tribalized/or died off with diseases so Portugues is the only language (except English for tourists). Am I wrong?
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Since Equatorial Guinea's official and national language is Spanish, wouldn't that technically make all of it's residents Latinos?
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Old 02-12-2013, 03:43 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 17 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Since Equatorial Guinea's official and national language is Spanish, wouldn't that technically make all of it's residents Latinos?
No, only the one's that speak Spanish as a mother tongue.

When it comes to Africa, and in this case Equatorial Guinea, this applies 100% to the whites and to most of the mixed race individuals; but among the blacks, it depends on whether they live in the city (most likely westernized) or in the country (least likely). For the one's in the city, depends on the social class, with the further up, the greater the likelihood they would speak a European language as a mother tongue.

European influence in rural areas drops significantly the further away from the main cities as one goes, and this is noticeable not only in the language, but also in lifestyle.

A person needs to speak a language since birth, in order for their thought process and way of interpreting the world to be molded by that language/culture.

If you speak more than one language, you have probably noticed that thought processes are different with each and often times, what makes sense in one language doesn't in another.

This is what differentiates Africa/Asia from Latin America concerning which regions are considered western. Also, the much higher racial mixing in Latin America certainly helped with this and the fact that colonialism lasted much longer in Latin America than anywhere else, too.

Take Dominicans as an example. Basically 100% of them speak Spanish as their mother tongue and over 90% speak exclusively Spanish, with the multilingual minority usually speaking some other European language (either English or French) and always as a second language. Then again, most Dominicans are mixed race anyway, so it goes without saying that they would be westernized.

Another population that can be used as an example are African Americans. Basically, 100% of African Americans have English as their mother tongue and see the world accordingly, often in shocking contrast to how those in Latin America or in Africa see it.

This is different from Equatorial Guinea, despite Spanish being the official language there.

Last edited by AntonioR; 02-12-2013 at 03:54 PM..
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