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Old 04-01-2013, 04:23 AM
 
5,239 posts, read 6,760,997 times
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"Globalization feeds on people that work cheaply". And she is right.


Nomsa Mazai performing Globalisation - YouTube
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Old 04-01-2013, 11:54 AM
 
6,559 posts, read 9,070,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by todd00 View Post
"Globalization feeds on people that work cheaply". And she is right.
How educated/skilled are these people who are being paid cheaply?

How well countries can benefit from globalization can come down to the education level of their population. Lower education will mean lower paying jobs. Also infrastructure development plays a part. Countries that lack good roads,bridges and railways can't fully benefit from trade because it's too difficult to get people and goods around. African governments need to start using the money from their resources to improve education and infrastructure in their countries in order to get more benefit from globalization.
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Old 04-02-2013, 07:49 PM
 
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Ya, well when ya got crooks in charge of the cookie jar, guess what will happen.

Zuma is a crook, no matter the color, crooks come in all shades, people should be most concerned with getting an honest leader in office.
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Denver
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Well Africans wouldn't go get jobs those jobs that ship products to overseas countries if they had other jobs that were better. If they think the jobs are so horrible, then they can quit. It's just that easy.
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Old 04-09-2013, 04:32 PM
 
5,239 posts, read 6,760,997 times
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Originally Posted by Phil P View Post
Well Africans wouldn't go get jobs those jobs that ship products to overseas countries if they had other jobs that were better. If they think the jobs are so horrible, then they can quit. It's just that easy.
Ya, they have lots of choices don't they.
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:25 PM
 
6,559 posts, read 9,070,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by todd00 View Post
Ya, they have lots of choices don't they.
I once heard that the best thing for these workers in the poor countries with sweatshops is for there to be more sweatshops. Why? Because with more sweatshops the workers will have more options. With these options companies will now have to compete to attract and keep labor. So with this competition for labor wages and working conditions will improve over time.

Another thing people need to keep in mind is that sweatshops are a stage in economic development. The U.S once had sweatshops. Countries with large numbers of under educated,unskilled workers won't be attracting high paying jobs. These sweatshops are a starting point for these workers.
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Old 04-10-2013, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
4,904 posts, read 6,116,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I once heard that the best thing for these workers in the poor countries with sweatshops is for there to be more sweatshops. Why? Because with more sweatshops the workers will have more options. With these options companies will now have to compete to attract and keep labor. So with this competition for labor wages and working conditions will improve over time.

Another thing people need to keep in mind is that sweatshops are a stage in economic development. The U.S once had sweatshops. Countries with large numbers of under educated,unskilled workers won't be attracting high paying jobs. These sweatshops are a starting point for these workers.
I like most all of your posts. They make sense.
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Old 04-11-2013, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,505,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Another thing people need to keep in mind is that sweatshops are a stage in economic development. The U.S once had sweatshops. Countries with large numbers of under educated,unskilled workers won't be attracting high paying jobs. These sweatshops are a starting point for these workers.
Exactly; The late Alastair Cooke hit the nail on the head when he observed that "Bad as things were, it was better than what came before."

And, it might be added, not as good as what will evolve if human progress is allowed to take its course without Big Brother's "help".
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