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Old 07-11-2013, 09:54 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,442 posts, read 22,387,220 times
Reputation: 8635

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Who cares? They are rappers. And do you interpret every expression so literally?

"I've got a frog in my throat."

"Impossible! A frog could never fit in your throat. Unless, that is, you were eating frog legs and smaller pieces you had chewed up got stuck in your throat."

"He's pushing the envelope."

"No he's not. I don't see any envelope."

"It's raining cats and dogs out here."

"Let's be serious. Please find evidence that cats and dogs have ever rained from the sky. You will find none."

"Are you going to hit the books tonight?"

"No. Why would I hit books? Books don't hit back!"

And you catch my drift. I've never thought of these expressions as anything to be taken literally or seriously. I've always viewed it as an inspirational sort of thing similar to saying "Black Power."
If only it were that simple. I am guessing you may not be black. It seems like "oh they're just rappers" is the simple way to go. I think what's not being understood is that, these rappers are quite often the voice of the people who listen to them and often rap about the things that are truly believed by many. Myths run rampant in the Black American community especially if it's anything that may give a self esteem boost, irrespective of whether it's accurate or not.
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Old 07-11-2013, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,483 posts, read 10,480,113 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Those expressions are different from people coming with historical and racial views. Those rappers and other Afrocentric advocates are coming with that they feel is the "truth". Anyway another issue I have with those rappers and Afrocentrics in general is that they rarely deal with the real Africa. Their Africa is a "majestic motherland". Whereas too much of the real Africa has corrupt governments,warlords,mismanaged economies,unecessary poverty,outdated practices towards women(FGM,child brides,trokosi).

I've never heard those rappers and other Afrocentrics touch on those issues. Did Dr. Molefi Asante ever talk on the civil war in Liberia? Did the X-Clan ever rap about the corruption in Nigeria? No. Instead you got a lot of romanticized,idealized talk about how everything European was bad and everything African was pure,righteous and holy.
First of all it's music and not a study of historical documentation. I agree a lot with what BajanYankee said in his earlier post. You can't interpret every expression a rapper makes in their lyrics so seriously. Also you are bashing rappers for looking at Africa as a "majesty motherland". My response to that is "so what!". Are rappers not allowed to look at Africa from a positive perspective as oppose to always having a negative viewpoint of the continent?

Last edited by gwillyfromphilly; 07-11-2013 at 10:21 AM..
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Old 07-11-2013, 10:10 AM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,497,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I'm all for black pride based on accurate history.

No need to romanticize and put blackness on a pedestal in order to feel good about it.


Actually Mesopotamia in modern day Iraq is considered where civilization began. The recently found Jiroft culture of Iran may be older.

believe what you want, even if it is brainwash. i don't really care.

you claim to be black but seem to be pretty confused.....rofl.
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Old 07-11-2013, 10:26 AM
 
6,568 posts, read 9,083,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
. You can't interpret every expression a rapper makes in his lyrics so seriously.
I'm not talking about rappers who use expressions or figures of speech. BDP's Why Is That? wasn't a figure of speech song. It's a song dealing with what KRS One thought was accurate history. Find me some paintings where the Egyptians portrayed black Israelites? Anyway...


Quote:
Also you are bashing rappers for looking at Africa as a "majesty motherland". My response to that is "so what!". Are rappers not allowed to look at Africa from a positive perspective as oppose to always having a negative viewpoint of the continent?
Yes you can have a positive view of Africa. But I think that a broad realistic view of the continent is what's needed. I think many of these rappers aren't too familiar with the real Africa which has good and bad things in it's history and current day issues.
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Old 07-11-2013, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,999 posts, read 1,993,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I mentioned how this descendant from kings & queens view of Africa was popular with many Afrocentric rappers in the late 80's to early 90's. Another related phrase that was popular in Afrocentric rap was:

"From Pyramids To Projects" (housing projects)

The view here was that black-Americans were actually descendant from the Nile Valley Africans(Egyptians mainly,Nubians)who built the pyramids. So when the phrase 'descendant from kings and queens' is used I think many are suggesting that black-Americans are descendant from the kings and queens of ancient Egypt. But that's not where our actual African ancestors came from. Some of these views on Africa that have been developed by many Afrocentric black-Americans may be the results of us not being familiar with the specifics of the different regions of Africa,their history and the different tribes of the area. So many black-Americans kinda have a generalized idea of us being descendant from all Africans in a way.
Hey, I know little to nothing at all about psychology, never took a single class in it my life, and so I may be way off on this. But I wonder if this "cognitive dissonance" thing has anything to do with any of this? I was reading a little about cognitive dissonance on Wikipedia. Cognitive dissonance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

White people do the same thing with ancient Rome.

I don't have Italian ancestry. I have Germany ancestry going into Trier, Germany (ancient Roman settlement) and Hungary (raided by Mongol horsemen). The surname on Trier branch is an ancient Roman name, and one that Constantine the Great had as well. Possibly, either some ancestors with that name were slaves of the Romans or maybe they married into the Roman family lines?

The important thing here is that my Germanic ancestors were not Romans but perceived by the Romans as barbarians. And centuries after the fall of Rome some parts of Eastern Europe, I've read, were covered as thick forests filled with barbarian tribes that were cannibals.

But I think white people have trouble regarding their race as having largely been barbarians at one time.

Black-Americans seek this grand past too. Like "Europe" became all of Rome to whites so to ethnic Black-Americans all of Africa was "Egypt."

My black side I just presume came from West Africa. Because of the slave trade and antebellum South's culture I know nothing about where in Africa my black ancestors came from like I do with my German side--which has been orally passed down for the most part.
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Old 07-11-2013, 11:08 PM
 
8,225 posts, read 10,802,397 times
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It isn't true,that's all.
Just like all those whites in Virginia who claim to be decendents of Pocahontas.
A myth. I have heard some black nationalist say that too.
Most blacks don't have any East African heritage.
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Old 07-11-2013, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
1,999 posts, read 1,993,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Here's a post where this guy digs into every detail and nuance of Nas' song "I Can."

History Lesson Gone Awry: Analysis of the Third Verse of Nas' "I Can" - General Music Reviews - Epinions.com

I'm honestly not sure why he wasted at least an hour of his life writing this post. It's a rap song, not a doctoral thesis. I thought the general theme of the song was fine even if there were egregious historical inaccuracies throughout. I'm not going to hold a rapper who barely finished high school to the same standard as John Hope Franklin.
Intelligent cat.

But one point I saw that struck me as inaccurate. I thought the Spanish were largely taking silver from the region of the Aztecs?
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:03 AM
 
6,568 posts, read 9,083,582 times
Reputation: 2842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supine View Post
Black-Americans seek this grand past too. Like "Europe" became all of Rome to whites so to ethnic Black-Americans all of Africa was "Egypt."
Yeah I can see that. If you want to put up a youtube video that will get alot of views and comments just put up a video about the Egyptians and asking about their race.
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:07 AM
 
6,568 posts, read 9,083,582 times
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Just in case people missed my link on Linton Kwesi Johnson.


Quote:
PART OF THE REASONING BEHIND THIS IS TO INSTILL A SENSE OF PRIDE IN THE COMMUNITY. THE CHILDREN ARE TAUGHT THAT THEIR ANCESTORS WERE KINGS AND QUEENS AND NOT JUST SLAVES THAT WERE BROUGHT OVER HERE.

Yes, that's alright. But once you've done that, where do you go from there? You can't tell the children that all of us were kings and queens because if there were kings and queens then they must have ruled over somebody else...

Linton Kwesi Johnson interview
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Old 07-12-2013, 03:37 AM
 
Location: Sin City
241 posts, read 371,653 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Well it was a common saying among many Afrocentric/knowledge rappers back in the early 90's. Along with the "from pyramids to projects" phrase. Our west and central African ancestors didn't build the pyramids in Egypt.
You're oversimplifying the Afrocentric movement in hip hop during the late 80's/early 90's

The praise given to Africa wasn't exclusive to Egypt. There are countless records bigging up the empires of Mali, Ghana, and other areas.

The whole purpose behind it was to counter the Euro-American tendency to ignorantly believe that people of color had no history of civilization or achievement prior to being brought to America.
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