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Old 11-13-2014, 05:14 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 11 days ago)
 
5,166 posts, read 8,017,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lexdiamondz1902 View Post
The same could be said for Bolivia, Paraguay and parts of Ecuador and Peru where Spanish is spoken as a second, foreign language by wide portions of the population who are of Indigenous ancestry and have no ties to Spain whatsoever. If Equatorial Guinea isn't hispanic then neither is Bolivia.
Bolivia isn't Hispanic but it does has Hispanic areas such as Santa Cruz in the eastern part where most of the people speak Spanish and descend from the Spaniards whether fully or mixed with something else, Paraguay is debatable, but the others certainly are based on language (in Peru only 16% speaks an Indigenous language and in Ecuador its less than 7% and that includes the bilinguals.)

On the ethnic level, 95% of Paraguayans are mixed with Spanish, 52% of Peruvians are either mixed with Spanish or are overwhelmingly of Spanish ancestry, 85% of Ecuadorians are either of Spanish descent or are mixed with Spanish; and only 45% of Bolivians have heritages that connects them to Europe whether fully or mixed. As with the language, it tends to vary. For example, Lima, which is the capital of Peru, is essentially a Hispanic city with most of its population being mestizos and a significant minority are whites and most people speak Spanish as their mother tongue, but once you go into the mountain areas that's another type of Peru that has little to do with the Peru of Lima.

This contrast with Equatorial Guineans because roughly 1.4% of the population actually has heritages from outside Sub-Saharan Africa and that includes the mixed types that probably makes up most of that tiny minority. The remaining 98.6% are 100% of Sub-Saharan African extraction, albeit from different ethnic origins or tribes. Equatorial Guinea's situation is similar to the Philippines with the exception that the latter was part of Spain for many more centuries than the former.
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Old 12-10-2014, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Middle of the Pacific Ocean
11,658 posts, read 6,266,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Hispanic is a self-declared category created by the US Census Bureau. Any person can claim to be Hispanic, which is defined as having a cultural or ethnic relationship to the people of Spain. If a person from Equatorial Guinea made this claim in the USA, it would likely not be challenged.

"In the eyes of the US Census Bureau, Hispanics or Latinos can be of any race, any ancestry, any ethnicity, or any country of origin," -- Wikipedia

He is a black person of African ancestry who grew up in a Spanish speaking country. How does that make him different from a black Panamanian, whose only claim to distinction is that his ancestors from Guinea spent a couple of generations in the Caribbean and Central America?
I don't know, but I never thought that language alone qualified one to call themselves "Hispanic." Rather, in my view, it was being part of a larger Hispanic culture, of which language can be important (but, then again, not all Hispanics speak Spanish), that makes someone Hispanic. If the main/only thing people form Equatorial Guinea have in common with Hispanic/Spanish culture is language (i.e. they still have their indigenous food, music, and, to a lesser extent, language, etc.), then I don't know if I'd go as far as to call them Hispanic.
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Old 01-17-2015, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Sanjo, Califas.
570 posts, read 370,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prospectheightsresident View Post
I don't know, but I never thought that language alone qualified one to call themselves "Hispanic." Rather, in my view, it was being part of a larger Hispanic culture, of which language can be important (but, then again, not all Hispanics speak Spanish), that makes someone Hispanic. If the main/only thing people form Equatorial Guinea have in common with Hispanic/Spanish culture is language (i.e. they still have their indigenous food, music, and, to a lesser extent, language, etc.), then I don't know if I'd go as far as to call them Hispanic.
I agree with you, maybe the term "hispanic" is not the best name that we can use for this purpose, but is the one that people is using to describe THE CULTURE of a group that has some more or less the same customs and habits, with their deferences of course.
Antonio, if we follow your reasoning nobody with be a member of any group, because the human race is so mixed and will get even more complex with the world been a planet village.
But even do we or you don't think The Philippines and Equatorial Guinea are not "Hispanic", is not up to us, is up to them, they might see, feel and think they are.
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Old 01-17-2015, 08:21 PM
 
15,065 posts, read 19,687,281 times
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Originally Posted by Brokconl View Post
just found out about a country in Africa called Equatorial Guinea and it's official language is Spanish, does this make them Hispanic?
In my book: Speaking Spanish = Hispanic

Growing up in Venezuela I knew people that were immigrants or 2nd, 3rd generations Spanish, Portuguese, German, Italian, Haitian... Even a guy that was Hungarian and spoke perfect Spanish.
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Old 01-18-2015, 11:57 PM
 
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Maybe by pure definition, but I can guarantee you, because of the way societies and cultures are often constructed in African countries, that it does not share many of the same characteristics of other Hispanic countries.
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Old 01-19-2015, 12:24 AM
 
Location: Middle of the Pacific Ocean
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
In my book: Speaking Spanish = Hispanic

Growing up in Venezuela I knew people that were immigrants or 2nd, 3rd generations Spanish, Portuguese, German, Italian, Haitian... Even a guy that was Hungarian and spoke perfect Spanish.
So if I learn Spanish via Rosetta Stone/interacting with Spanish speakers, am I instantly Hispanic?
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Old 01-19-2015, 04:44 AM
 
1,689 posts, read 2,222,826 times
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hispanic = your native language is hispanic

equatorial guineans are hispanic

so are many people in western sahara and morocco and philipinos
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Old 01-19-2015, 04:45 AM
 
1,689 posts, read 2,222,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prospectheightsresident View Post
So if I learn Spanish via Rosetta Stone/interacting with Spanish speakers, am I instantly Hispanic?
if you speak the language and it becomes part of your daily living yes!!!
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Old 01-19-2015, 04:47 AM
 
1,689 posts, read 2,222,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Bolivia isn't Hispanic but it does has Hispanic areas such as Santa Cruz in the eastern part where most of the people speak Spanish and descend from the Spaniards whether fully or mixed with something else, Paraguay is debatable, but the others certainly are based on language (in Peru only 16% speaks an Indigenous language and in Ecuador its less than 7% and that includes the bilinguals.)

On the ethnic level, 95% of Paraguayans are mixed with Spanish, 52% of Peruvians are either mixed with Spanish or are overwhelmingly of Spanish ancestry, 85% of Ecuadorians are either of Spanish descent or are mixed with Spanish; and only 45% of Bolivians have heritages that connects them to Europe whether fully or mixed. As with the language, it tends to vary. For example, Lima, which is the capital of Peru, is essentially a Hispanic city with most of its population being mestizos and a significant minority are whites and most people speak Spanish as their mother tongue, but once you go into the mountain areas that's another type of Peru that has little to do with the Peru of Lima.

This contrast with Equatorial Guineans because roughly 1.4% of the population actually has heritages from outside Sub-Saharan Africa and that includes the mixed types that probably makes up most of that tiny minority. The remaining 98.6% are 100% of Sub-Saharan African extraction, albeit from different ethnic origins or tribes. Equatorial Guinea's situation is similar to the Philippines with the exception that the latter was part of Spain for many more centuries than the former.
Bolivians are vastly indigenous

Paraguayans are mixed, many are germanic, others are pure indigenous, others are fully spaniards or mixed with it, many have brazilian roots.


Peruvians are not mostly spanish, most peruvians are indigenous, have you been to the sierra? even lima is full of indigenous looking people!!!

Equatorians are also quite indian, but also plenty of blacks and mixes of indians with something else.

peru and ecuador are anything but spanish!!!
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Old 01-19-2015, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Middle of the Pacific Ocean
11,658 posts, read 6,266,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irene-cd View Post
if you speak the language and it becomes part of your daily living yes!!!
What about those people who identify themselves as Hispanic, and are immersed in numerous aspects of Hispanic culture (from food, history, dance, music, etc.), yet who do not speak Spanish because their parents never passed it down? Are those people not true Hispanics in your book? Are Ted Cruz and Jennifer Lopez (Lopez is not fluent in Spanish, though she has gotten better over the years) not real Hispanics?
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