U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-26-2013, 09:19 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,434 posts, read 22,351,050 times
Reputation: 8623

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
I think the same thing happens with Martinique and Guadeloupe or French Guyana.
True
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-27-2013, 03:56 PM
 
Location: DF
758 posts, read 1,961,215 times
Reputation: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avex View Post
Interesting and informative comments from everyone.

Philippines has a wealth of Spanish colonial architecture too.
I really wish Spanish was still spoken in this country.

Hey joelaldo do they use vosotros in EG?

Yes they do.

Spanish was introduced to Equatorial Guinea over 100 years ago, and seeing as there are numerous indigenous languages, upon independence, they kept Spanish as a national language as a 'lingua franca'.

Spanish was introduced to Latin America by Andalusians and Canarians (who use ustedes, and don't use Z or C in their speech)....since Spain and "Spanish" as a language hadn't been a uniform concept just yet (remember, Spain kicked out the moors in the 1490's and various iberic kingdoms hadn't yet unified and by the 1600s, Spain controlled much of the Americas)

When Spanish was introduced to Equatorial Guinea, there was more of a concept as to what Spanish was in Spain, and the Spanish that was introduced was more of a Madrileno variety.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2013, 11:02 PM
 
578 posts, read 755,984 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brokconl View Post
just found out about a country in Africa called Equatorial Guinea and it's official language is Spanish, does this make them Hispanic?
Equatorial Guinea also has Portuguese and French as additional official languages. Spanish is the main official language.

But yes Equitorial Guineans are definitely Hispanic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2013, 11:05 PM
 
578 posts, read 755,984 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
I guess they would be considered Afro-Latino. The more interesting question is "Would immigrants from that country be able to identify themselves as Hispanics in the United States?"
The terms Hispanic and Latino are usually applied to people from Spanish speaking nations in the Western Hemisphere although it does mention other "Spanish cultures" as being possibly included on this.

There is no need to say Afro-Latino as that is REDUNDANT. LATINO IS LATINO. Latinidad is vast.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2013, 11:46 PM
 
578 posts, read 755,984 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Most people in Latin America have some Spanish blood mixed in, so even though most are non-whites, they are genetically tied to Spain and that also legitimizes their cultural, linguistic, culinary, architectural, etc connection to Spain, Hispanic culture, and other Hispanic countries. This is also why a random person from Spain, Venezuela, Cuba, Chile, Panama, Mexico, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Argentina, etc may actually be distant cousins along their European genetic side regardless if they are white, mestizos, mulattoes or whatever other racial mix that includes Spanish/European in the mix.

Having said all of that, the single category taken into consideration if a person is Hispanic or not is actually not based on whether a person has Spanish blood in them, but rather if a person speaks Spanish as their mother tongue. The reason of this is that language affects very deeply the way people see and interpret the world and the mother tongue of a person often does makes the biggest difference between them and others that don't speak the same mother tongue, and this difference is present even with people that speak said mother tongue as a second language.

I'm not sure if most Equatorial Guineans speak Spanish as a mother tongue. Unlike in the Western Hemisphere, in Africa its much more common for natives to speak an African language as a mother tongue and a European language as a second language (what European language predominates as a second language depends on the colonial history of the country: ex-British colonies have English as a second language, ex-French have French, ex-Italian have Italian, etc.)

Take Dominicans as an example. Regardless of the fact that over 90% of Dominicans have Spanish blood and have a genetic/historic/cultural connection to Spain (most of the population is of mostly black/white racially mixed and the white part is mostly of Spanish origin, and most of the white minority descend from Spaniards too); practically 100% of ethnic Dominicans speak Spanish as their mother tongue and over 95% of them not only speak Spanish as a mother tongue, but its also the only language that they speak.

This may not be the case in Equatorial Guinea. For one, most of the population is probably of pure Sub-Saharan African origin and most of the population probably lives in the countryside. That combination is almost a guarantee that most don't speak Spanish as their mother tongue, because in Africa the European influence is almost exclusively concentrated along the major coastal towns and major cities. As soon as people leave the cities, the European influences diminishes very quickly and this is very noticeable.

I'll have to do more research into Equatorial Guinea to be sure of their dynamics, but I'm confident what I said here is probably close to reality.

Equatorial Guinea may be a very true case of colonialism (non-European people having a European culture -which is alien to them- imposed on them) whereas in Latin America I'm not so sure colonialism exist in its true form, because most Latin Americans do have at least some Spanish ancestry, so Spanish culture is not really any more alien to them as are the indigenous or African cultures as well.
Equatorial Guinea has a lot of mulattoes and blacks that were colonized by Spain and there are many islands part of Equitoreal Guinea that had heavy Spanish influence and colonization. Spain controlled Equitorial Guinea until the late 1970s
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2013, 11:50 PM
 
578 posts, read 755,984 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
I don't think Jtur88 is a much better explanation (it is much more concise than mine, lol) but it does depends on a few pending issues.

This is what the actual definition is:

His·pan·ic (h-spnk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to Spain or Spanish-speaking Latin America.
2. Of or relating to a Spanish-speaking people or culture.
n.
1. A Spanish-speaking person.
2. A U.S. citizen or resident of Latin-American or Spanish descent.
Hispanic - definition of Hispanic by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

Under this definition, whether Equatorial Guineans are Hispanic or not depends on whether most of the people speak Spanish as a mother tongue (ie. Spanish-speaking people or culture) or if most Equatorial Guineans have Spanish ancestry.

I'm almost certain that most Equatorial Guineans are of 100% African origin with a tiny minority composed of mixed race and fully Spanish descendants, so that last part is out of the question.

The first part depends on what most Equatorial Guineans speak as a mother tongue, since that is the most likely language that they use in everyday communication and might only use Spanish as a second language and only in official cases (every time they deal with the government.) But this I have to research. If most of them do speak Spanish as their mother tongue, then they should be considered a Hispanic people; but if they don't, then they are not Hispanic but rather native Africans with a Spanish speaking government and elite. This would be similar to a US American that studied and mastered Spanish as a second language. Despite his fluency with the Spanish language, Hispanic he is not. A person is either born Hispanic or not, you can't become one in life.

Keep in mind that I'm referring to Equatorial Guineans in general, because I think its more than obvious that at the very least some Equatorial Guineans are Hispanic regardless if most of the population is or not.
Also look up the definitions of Hispano and hispanico in Spanish language dictionaries as well. That provides a deeper context and detail to this specific topic. Just saying
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2013, 12:05 AM
 
578 posts, read 755,984 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Good info. The Philippines are included here as, IMO they should be.
Many people in the Phillipines still speak Spanish to this day. Spanish should still be an official language in the Phillipines IMHO
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2013, 12:13 AM
 
578 posts, read 755,984 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I agree with the similarities. I can see how similar Filipinos and Mexicans are even just from watching Mexican novelas. My brother in law who is pure Mexican also thinks Filipinos and Mexicans are very similar, Probably has to do with Mexico's governance of the Philippines for 250 years. Philippines was colonised by Spain through the governance of Mexico so it is normal that these 2 countries shared many things with eachother for 250 years.
Also many Fillipinos were brought to Mexico as slaves during the Spanish colonial period. And many Mexicans were brought to the Phillipines as slaves and there was back and forth mutual migrations and trading. In fact, Afro Mexican slaves and black African slaves in Mexico if they disobeyed or rebelled against the Spanish owners or authority would be sent to Phillipines and docked there or sent there to be tortured as punishment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2013, 12:16 AM
 
578 posts, read 755,984 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygal4u View Post
Everyone keeps mentioning Spanish and hispanic...

Here is my question: What About the Brazilians?
They speak Portuguese,so does that not make them hispanic?

What about forth generation Nyc Puerto Ricans who no longer speak Spanish?
Can they still be considered Hispanic?
Brazilians and other Portuguese speaking nations are NOT Hispanic. They are Lusophones, and therefore are LUSITANIC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-28-2013, 12:23 AM
 
578 posts, read 755,984 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Brazil is not part of the Hispanidad for starters and the history is with that or Portugal, not Spain so I'm thinking no.
In the US yes they can still be considered Hispanic. The US census does not stipulate that they have to speak Spanish.
Actually the USA Census does NOT include Brazilians in it's definition of Hispanic. In fact even the term Latino which is used interchangeably does NOT include them in the Census.

I think the Latino media socially includes Brazil when talking about Latinos. Brazilians are often included in that sense.

Hispanic/Latino are centered around Hispanophone Latin American peoples though.

If Brazilians are sometimes included, what about Haitians and other French speaking nations and French Creole speaking peoples.

Hell to take it even a step further what about places like Trinidad? Trinidad still practices Spanish customs and traditions from the colonial era period, and it has French influences and even some Portuguese. Can't Trinidadians technically be considered Latino? Many people speak Spanish there still.

Hell what about the ABC islands Dutch speaking islands, with their Papiamentu and Papiamento languages and their heavy Spanish and Portuguese influences?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top