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Old 09-13-2013, 06:58 AM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,913,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Black-Americans aren't generally known to have many direct African cultural influences like those found in Haiti,Brazil or Cuba. But didn't some degree of African influence shape the way that black-Americans do and approach certain things? Like for example blacks in America have been well known for being good dancers and innovative with music. Where does that come from? Black Americans have their own way of speaking english called "black english" by some. What influenced that?

Could Jazz music had been developed without some amount of African sensibilities? In order for James Brown to create the music he created wouldn't that have also required that it come from someone of African descent? A song like Flashlight by Parliament could have only come from African descendant musicians. Dance styles like Locking and popping(popular in the 70's-80's)could only have been by created by African descendants also.

Basically what I'm getting at is that it's true that Black-Americans don't have the more obvious African cultural influences found in a Cuba or Haiti but much of what we do in music,dance,language,worship and food does show some African sensibilities if you look a little deeper at things.
Just another way of saying, "I don't like this country and I don't want to be an American."

One is either African or they are American. I seriously doubt many of them have dual citizenship.

When one is a real American they are proud of it and don't need any other adjective to describe who they are. I make no apology for saying so. It is a true statement. There is nothing wrong with stating ones ancestry but the American who has another adjective with it needs to decide which country they want to be and go there.

Last edited by NCN; 09-13-2013 at 07:07 AM..

 
Old 09-13-2013, 09:11 AM
 
Location: America
6,987 posts, read 15,496,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Just another way of saying, "I don't like this country and I don't want to be an American."

One is either African or they are American. I seriously doubt many of them have dual citizenship.

When one is a real American they are proud of it and don't need any other adjective to describe who they are. I make no apology for saying so. It is a true statement. There is nothing wrong with stating ones ancestry but the American who has another adjective with it needs to decide which country they want to be and go there.
Interesting opinion.
 
Old 09-13-2013, 09:40 AM
 
Location: California
1,191 posts, read 1,288,374 times
Reputation: 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Just another way of saying, "I don't like this country and I don't want to be an American."

One is either African or they are American. I seriously doubt many of them have dual citizenship.

When one is a real American they are proud of it and don't need any other adjective to describe who they are. I make no apology for saying so. It is a true statement. There is nothing wrong with stating ones ancestry but the American who has another adjective with it needs to decide which country they want to be and go there.
The real world is not this cut and dry. America is (and has always been) a nation of immigrants. Why should people turn their back on their ethnic heritage in order to show they are "real" Americans? What is a "real" American anyway? There are many who scream "real" American who can't tell you a thing about the Articles of Confederation, the Federalist Papers, or the Constitution.
 
Old 09-13-2013, 10:22 AM
 
56,770 posts, read 81,126,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
Now this novel, claim Africans aren't really Africans either. You do realize European penetration into Africa only happen about 100 years or so. The difference is African-Americans lived next to European settlers in a country run by them and Blacks were a minority outnumbered 9-1 nationally for hundreds of years. In Africa few countries supported White settlement and no where did they make up a majority.

By your argument the Chinese are no longer Chinese.
Actually, Blacks weren't always outnumbered 9-1. I believe the first census of 1790, Blacks made up about 19% of the population. So, there has been variation in that regard throughout US history.
 
Old 09-13-2013, 02:28 PM
 
9,463 posts, read 10,211,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
It's debatable if any of the people you mentioned do either. However of course African-Americans have a different history in that they were involuntary migrants and were forced to adapt to the will of their masters.
You might want to consult the Chase Calendar of Events and see, how many ethnic festivals are held around the US every year. People aren't coming from Ireland, Itally, Germany, to put on these events. These are Americans who have retained enough of their homelands culture to put on well attended authentic events.
 
Old 09-13-2013, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,624 posts, read 16,456,834 times
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African-American NFL wide receivers take a trip to Senegal. http://espn.go.com/espn/feature/stor...9/receive-give

Related:Senegal ex-president's son paid 127m into Monaco bank accounts | World news | The Guardian
 
Old 09-13-2013, 04:54 PM
 
Location: City of North Las Vegas, NV
11,290 posts, read 7,888,598 times
Reputation: 3019
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Just another way of saying, "I don't like this country and I don't want to be an American."

One is either African or they are American. I seriously doubt many of them have dual citizenship.

When one is a real American they are proud of it and don't need any other adjective to describe who they are. I make no apology for saying so. It is a true statement. There is nothing wrong with stating ones ancestry but the American who has another adjective with it needs to decide which country they want to be and go there.
yes, so true. AMERICANS should say I am AMERiCAN of african/etc descent....
 
Old 09-13-2013, 05:48 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,913,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildWestDude View Post
yes, so true. AMERICANS should say I am AMERiCAN of african/etc descent....
Many Americans who think they are of African and other descents really are not. I started tracing my family tree and found the last name I thought was English was really German. The name I thought came from Ireland was really descended from the British Royal Family. The American Indian blood came from my great, great grandmother and not from my great grandfather that I have yet to find. I have found three names that could be he, one was a mulatto. I could possibly have black ancestry too.

Now am I supposed to call myself a German, English, American Indian and African American. That sounds foolish for a person whose ancestors were already here when the country was formed. And for those who say this is a nation of immigrants; no it is not. Nobody in my family was an immigrant. They were here when the country was formed. The next thing you know the word immigrant will have a different meaning.

The ancestors of many people who call themselves African Americans were not immigrants either. They were living in America when the country was formed. That makes them part of the founding fathers and they should be proud of that.

An immigrant is a person who moves into a country AFTER it is formed.

Last edited by NCN; 09-13-2013 at 05:57 PM..
 
Old 09-13-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,443 posts, read 22,399,654 times
Reputation: 8636
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliDude1 View Post
The real world is not this cut and dry. America is (and has always been) a nation of immigrants. Why should people turn their back on their ethnic heritage in order to show they are "real" Americans? What is a "real" American anyway? There are many who scream "real" American who can't tell you a thing about the Articles of Confederation, the Federalist Papers, or the Constitution.
^This. Most of those people who say that phrase know little about the USA but think they do. Personally, I call myself "Black American" and I prefer to use that term. However, I take no exception to what someone else decides to call themselves. What business is it of mine? I am not so insecure in who I am that I have to criticized others for being proud of who they are. So many native born Americans might say they are Asian. Others, Asian-American and still others just American. If this bothers some people they really need to check themselves.
 
Old 09-13-2013, 06:09 PM
 
Location: City of North Las Vegas, NV
11,290 posts, read 7,888,598 times
Reputation: 3019
Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
Many Americans who think they are of African and other descents really are not. I started tracing my family tree and found the last name I thought was English was really German. The name I thought came from Ireland was really descended from the British Royal Family. The American Indian blood came from my great, great grandmother and not from my great grandfather that I have yet to find. I have found three names that could be he, one was a mulatto. I could possibly have black ancestry too.

Now am I supposed to call myself a German, English, American Indian and African American. That sounds foolish for a person whose ancestors were already here when the country was formed. And for those who say this is a nation of immigrants; no it is not. Nobody in my family was an immigrant. They were here when the country was formed. The next thing you know the word immigrant will have a different meaning.

The ancestors of many people who call themselves African Americans were not immigrants either. They were living in America when the country was formed. That makes them part of the founding fathers and they should be proud of that.

An immigrant is a person who moves into a country AFTER it is formed.
While what you say is true and correct, I don't think it makes you or others like you more American than the 2nd or even 1st generation Americans.
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