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Old 08-28-2013, 09:22 PM
 
Location: The Magnolia City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post

While the attempt to define African Americans was clearly designed to provide the same kind of cultural awareness to the descendants of slaves and take the emphasis away from a physical attribute, it seems to re-enforce the earlier ideas. By glossing over the reality that Africa has no cultural uniformity (like Italian or German or British) it reeks of superficiality.
I think this overlooks the fact that several aspects of African heritage are present in the culture of slave descendants and have been since the beginning. The "Africanness" of American born blacks is not some wholly contrived additive designed just for the purpose to make us different. It has its roots; in some ways that I'm sure even many blacks aren't aware of.

 
Old 08-29-2013, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
Slightly over 200 years ago the belief that different races had evolved separately in each continent and shared no common ancestor, was advocated in England, Germany,France and prominently in the US by Samuel Morton, Josiah Nott and Louis Agassiz. The idea became popular in the 19th century and provided much of the idealogical basis for natural separation of the races.

Today all scientists reject that belief and feel that the concept of race is a simplistic idea, the mankind has a common ancestry (which was almost certainly dark skinned), and that the white skinned people was a variation developed to combat vitamin D deficiency.

The so called hyphenated-American was a cultural idea that was developed to diminish the Americans from less desirable European cultures. While they are legally Americans, they are Italian-Americans, Irish-Americans, etc. The concept was gradually turned into a point of pride by European cultures.

While the attempt to define African Americans was clearly designed to provide the same kind of cultural awareness to the descendants of slaves and take the emphasis away from a physical attribute, it seems to re-enforce the earlier ideas. By glossing over the reality that Africa has no cultural uniformity (like Italian or German or British) it reeks of superficiality.
Should be noted the common ancestor theory is still being called into question with discovery of remains in Asia.
 
Old 08-29-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Midwest
259 posts, read 309,002 times
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99% of African-Americans have no cultural connection to Africa at all. It's just more to distinguish heritage now. Frankly, I do not like any term that that distinguishes American races. We are all American. Period.
 
Old 08-29-2013, 11:21 AM
 
6,559 posts, read 9,071,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ8089 View Post
99% of African-Americans have no cultural connection to Africa at all. It's just more to distinguish heritage now. Frankly, I do not like any term that that distinguishes American races. We are all American. Period.
Ok but like I mentioned earlier you have to look deeper for Africa in Black-America. Could Black-Americans had created funk music without us being of African descent? Black-Americans still have African sensibilities when it comes to music.
 
Old 08-29-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Midwest
259 posts, read 309,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Ok but like I mentioned earlier you have to look deeper for Africa in Black-America. Could Black-Americans had created funk music without us being of African descent? Black-Americans still have African sensibilities when it comes to music.
Please give me a logical connection between African descent and African-American music? You can't. There's no cultural connection! It sounds like you are just trying to make a connection between the two to justify something... As an African-American, I don't see the connection.
 
Old 08-29-2013, 01:51 PM
 
Location: City of North Las Vegas, NV
11,290 posts, read 7,877,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
This whole talk of "what is Black American culture?" is nothing more than propaganda designed to not only question but deny us our individuality, our unique experiences, and the right to preserve our heritage.

No, US Blacks are not Africans, but "American" barely scratches the surface of who we are as a group. By default, whites have a monopoly on that term, but it does not define who I am.
The only thing common is the similarity of the color of the skin. Black Americans are lighter in color and are AMERICANS first just like every other racial/ethnic group. By some Black Americans eating and dressing in African ways does NOT make you African! You might claim something at the very most if your parents are from there, but you got nothing to do with them except claim distant ancestry. Again, same holds true for other groups. For example, many Americans claim to be Irish e.t.c. but unless they have lived there for a long time then they are AMERICAN FIRST and have NO CLUE what its like to be one of them and their culture! Plain and simple.
 
Old 08-29-2013, 01:55 PM
 
6,559 posts, read 9,071,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ8089 View Post
Please give me a logical connection between African descent and African-American music? You can't. There's no cultural connection! It sounds like you are just trying to make a connection between the two to justify something... As an African-American, I don't see the connection.
It's the emphases on rhythm that both funk and African music share. Again it's more about African sensibilities with how Black-Americans approach music. Could James Brown had made the music he made had he been of Swedish descent? Could Michael Jackson had been the dancer he was had he been of Irish descent?
 
Old 08-29-2013, 02:01 PM
 
56,600 posts, read 80,890,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WildWestDude View Post
The only thing common is the similarity of the color of the skin. Black Americans are lighter in color and are AMERICANS first just like every other racial/ethnic group. By some Black Americans eating and dressing in African ways does NOT make you African! You might claim something at the very most if your parents are from there, but you got nothing to do with them except claim distant ancestry. Again, same holds true for other groups. For example, many Americans claim to be Irish e.t.c. but unless they have lived there for a long time then they are AMERICAN FIRST and have NO CLUE what its like to be one of them and their culture! Plain and simple.
Why do people think that all Black Africans are dark or don't vary in color as well? There is variation within all races in terms of skin tone. So, that isn't exclusive to just Black people and African Americans can vary in terms of skin tone as well.
 
Old 08-29-2013, 02:02 PM
 
56,600 posts, read 80,890,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
I think this overlooks the fact that several aspects of African heritage are present in the culture of slave descendants and have been since the beginning. The "Africanness" of American born blacks is not some wholly contrived additive designed just for the purpose to make us different. It has its roots; in some ways that I'm sure even many blacks aren't aware of.
Exactly and people make it seem like it is a bad thing if African Americans have taken a liking to their African roots. I don't get it.
 
Old 08-29-2013, 02:37 PM
 
9,431 posts, read 10,187,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ8089 View Post
Please give me a logical connection between African descent and African-American music? You can't. There's no cultural connection! It sounds like you are just trying to make a connection between the two to justify something... As an African-American, I don't see the connection.
Polyrhythm
Absence of chord progression
Falsetto
Pentatonic scales
Ostinado bass patterns
The audience as participants in a performance
Syncopation
Improvisation
Use of dominate chord on the tonic
Use of flatted; 5th. 3rd and 7th
Self aggrandizement in thematic material
The role of the musician in African and African American society is higher ( Bach cleaned stables in addition to his musical duties)
I could go on but suffice it to say that the only reason black music today doesn’t sound like country music or blue grass is Africa. The music of Black people in The United States had an identifiable nature by the late 1700’s. The first printing of “Yankee Doodle” also contained a song called “a Negro song”
You probably won’t find a scholar within the last 100 years who will agree with you
https://www.google.com/search?q=Afri...+music&spell=1

Last edited by thriftylefty; 08-29-2013 at 02:55 PM..
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