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Old 12-30-2013, 04:46 PM
 
Location: West Coast
1,199 posts, read 2,196,618 times
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Well I must be really different. I was in a relationship with a Congolese man while in college. We both had a great deal in common, and had a true connection. It was truly love and first sight for the both of us. I met a lot of African people in college because the Bay Area attracts people from various parts of West, Central, and East Africa. I have been to many weddings, parties, family gatherings with majority African people. I always felt completely welcomed as an African American woman. I come from a very loving and supportive family, and I noticed that among his family. I also come from a very educated family, same with his family. There are many marriages among Africans and African Americans. There are also close friendships. I disagree that the groups have nothing in common. Not true. My cousin is married to a woman from Senegal, my friend's sister is married to a guy from Nigeria, and another friend of mine is married to a guy from the Congo. I met a African American woman who married a guy from Nigeria. I met another woman married to a guy from Ghana. They both planned on leaving the U.S., and move to Ghana, but he passed away. She is remarried to another man from Ghana. I will say that most marriages seem to be between African men and African American women, but as in my own family, African women do marry African American men too.
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Old 12-30-2013, 07:16 PM
 
56,737 posts, read 81,061,259 times
Reputation: 12549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
Well I must be really different. I was in a relationship with a Congolese man while in college. We both had a great deal in common, and had a true connection. It was truly love and first sight for the both of us. I met a lot of African people in college because the Bay Area attracts people from various parts of West, Central, and East Africa. I have been to many weddings, parties, family gatherings with majority African people. I always felt completely welcomed as an African American woman. I come from a very loving and supportive family, and I noticed that among his family. I also come from a very educated family, same with his family. There are many marriages among Africans and African Americans. There are also close friendships. I disagree that the groups have nothing in common. Not true. My cousin is married to a woman from Senegal, my friend's sister is married to a guy from Nigeria, and another friend of mine is married to a guy from the Congo. I met a African American woman who married a guy from Nigeria. I met another woman married to a guy from Ghana. They both planned on leaving the U.S., and move to Ghana, but he passed away. She is remarried to another man from Ghana. I will say that most marriages seem to be between African men and African American women, but as in my own family, African women do marry African American men too.
I've seen this as well, as a couple of relatives on my mother's side have married African men. So, it is more common than people realize.
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Old 12-30-2013, 11:56 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,941,189 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by biafra4life View Post

Somewhere, that stopped. If you were not "keeping it real" and talking about killing/robbing/selling crack/objectifying women because "that was my reality back in the hood" then you didnt sell records. I doubt the Fugees would be able to sell records today. Two Haitians guys and a girl singing Fugeela??? That's soft! That's not keeping it real! To me, this, and not the death of tupac/biggie, is the reason for hip hop's demise.

The reason why I asked you about your knowledge of the history of hip hop is that you would have known when the corporate execs and unscrupulous promoters pushed gangsta rap because it was the most profitable as white kids bought it, once they thought it "authentic". That's where the "keeping it real" came in, convincing ghetto kids that they should dump the party music and play murder music instead.

Suddenly people who were popular in the late 80s were dumped by the early 90s. Lucky house music and New Jack came in, or the rest of us would have had nothing to listen to.

All a trick by the execs and many kids, black and white fell for it.

Indeed the NAACP and others protested and they were told by very bougie black and white execs that they don't know life in the ghetto and so should back off.
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Old 12-31-2013, 12:21 AM
 
284 posts, read 508,052 times
Reputation: 308
most of the africans that i meet coming into the US these days are nothing but scammers

they come here get whatever they can get, and then make a quick exit back to their homeland.
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Old 01-01-2014, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,624 posts, read 16,448,083 times
Reputation: 6348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
Well I must be really different. I was in a relationship with a Congolese man while in college. We both had a great deal in common, and had a true connection. It was truly love and first sight for the both of us. I met a lot of African people in college because the Bay Area attracts people from various parts of West, Central, and East Africa. I have been to many weddings, parties, family gatherings with majority African people. I always felt completely welcomed as an African American woman. I come from a very loving and supportive family, and I noticed that among his family. I also come from a very educated family, same with his family. There are many marriages among Africans and African Americans. There are also close friendships. I disagree that the groups have nothing in common. Not true. My cousin is married to a woman from Senegal, my friend's sister is married to a guy from Nigeria, and another friend of mine is married to a guy from the Congo. I met a African American woman who married a guy from Nigeria. I met another woman married to a guy from Ghana. They both planned on leaving the U.S., and move to Ghana, but he passed away. She is remarried to another man from Ghana. I will say that most marriages seem to be between African men and African American women, but as in my own family, African women do marry African American men too.
Yeah I've seen this more often than not. Although growing up we were warned to stay away from African-Americans. We grew up working class though so that may have more to do with it. Frankly most of our African-American neighbors weren't on the same page as my family in terms of academics.

Still as you say folks married African-Americans, have kids with them etc. It's only recently that I've encountered an individual of recent African background whose family disapproved of them marrying an African- American. Considering that he was born in the USA I was somewhat stunned when he told me.
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Old 01-01-2014, 03:00 PM
 
1,950 posts, read 3,299,650 times
Reputation: 1331
I love african men & haitian men. Such hard workers and providers they are. But the ones I've come across are usually a bit cuckoo, married, or have had hard lives (meaning lots of baggage). I'm an AA woman, and I do believe that I'll eventually come across a good one. Not necessarily discriminating since I only date black men, but this is just my experience.

I'm sure every woman (of every race) has to kiss a few frogs to find her prince, so I don't believe this paradigm I am facing is solely limited to AA women dealing with a certain race of men.
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Old 01-01-2014, 04:44 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 893,774 times
Reputation: 306
Why do people feel the need to compare African-Americans to Africans so much, compared to say European-Americans and Europeans?

Black Americans are always being compared to more recent immigrants, from Jamaica, Uganda, Somalia etc. and identity politics and angst in debate keeps arising because of it, in terms of forcing a connection based on looks/ancestry alone, but White Americans rarely seem to get compared much to more recent immigrants from say, Ireland, Greece, or Russia etc. and forced to deal with the fact that there are some immigrants that happen to "look like you".

I don't mean to be rude, but there does seem to be an annoying double standard here.
I'm not against discussing topics like these, but it should be discussed in a consistent and unbiased way.
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Old 01-01-2014, 09:24 PM
 
6,566 posts, read 9,083,582 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post

The reason why I asked you about your knowledge of the history of hip hop is that you would have known when the corporate execs and unscrupulous promoters pushed gangsta rap because it was the most profitable as white kids bought it, once they thought it "authentic". That's where the "keeping it real" came in, convincing ghetto kids that they should dump the party music and play murder music instead.
Here's my view on this. I often hear people asking what happened to the conscious/Afrocentric rap of the late 80's to early 90's?

I don't think there was a big conspiracy to silence conscious rappers. Conscious rap declined when it crossed over to the mainstream. This crossover happened through Arrested Development and to a lesser extent Public Enemy. PE and AD getting lots of MTV exposure and doing Lollapalooza concerts meant they had mainstream(white) acceptance. Once Afrocentric rap crossed over it lost some of it's edge. In other words it wasn't as "threatening" after it crossed over.

Afrocentric/conscious rap works better when it's not mainstream. When I once saw Speech of Arrested Development throwing up a Black power fist at a Lollapalooza concert in front of a bunch of drunk white college kids I wondered where Afrocentric Hip Hop was supposed to go after that?
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Old 01-02-2014, 12:33 AM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,941,189 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
. When I once saw Speech of Arrested Development throwing up a Black power fist at a Lollapalooza concert in front of a bunch of drunk white college kids I wondered where Afrocentric Hip Hop was supposed to go after that?

And that is exactly what happened. Record moguls (both black and white) saw a bigger market of white kids who would buy the CDs and the other promotional materials. Many black kids bought counterfeit tapes. Major labels replacing the independent labels went after the big market.

So gangsta rap was promoted ahead of the conscious/party rap, with black kids being sold the "keeping it real nonsense", and white kids thought that was authentically black (it helped that the thug conforms more to stereotypes of what black culture) and so bought it in their adolescent rebellion against their parents. I know their parents would have flipped hearing them referring to each other as " white n.....s",

Indeed I would say that the music industry as a whole killed itself with quick money commercialism instead of making quality music.
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Old 01-02-2014, 01:04 AM
 
6,566 posts, read 9,083,582 times
Reputation: 2842
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
The reason why I asked you about your knowledge of the history of hip hop is that you would have known when the corporate execs and unscrupulous promoters pushed gangsta rap because it was the most profitable as white kids bought it, once they thought it "authentic". That's where the "keeping it real" came in, convincing ghetto kids that they should dump the party music and play murder music instead.
As far as the decline of dance/party rap. Here again I take a different view over the conspiracy view. What I think hurt the dance oriented rap you heard from the 80's to early 90's was probably MC Hammer. I've heard others point out how Hammer having 50 dancers on stage and in his videos caused an overkill effect for dancing in Hip Hop. After Hammer and his 50 dancers fewer rappers wanted to dance or make dance oriented music like they used to. I think there's some merit to this view.
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