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Old 09-05-2017, 08:26 AM
 
24,247 posts, read 17,632,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I'll go a step further and say black male entrepreneurship should be a big topic of discussion. I'm not even talking about anything "innovative" either, but even creating a landscaping/plowing company or a corner store(which in many cases aren't even owned by black folks in black neighborhoods). Sometimes we might think it means to reinvent the wheel, when it really means to fill a need in the community.
Or you can leave the sexism out. If a woman has an idea for a business, there's nothing wrong with her hiring people of either gender.

And while having more small businesses might help, keep in mind small businesses pay the minimum wage, often offer no benefits or promotion either.

Creating lots of small businesses ALONE isn't going to do much to reduce poverty among African Americans. Arguably the GI Bill has done a lot more to boost African Americans into the middle class (or people of any race).

Veterans get free medical care, the military pays for their college, gets them subsidized mortgages, and those injured or who suffered medical issues get military disability. Spouses who take care of elderly military veterans get cash benefits.

I personally have known military veterans at top universities in the nation, and this was paid for by the government.
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Old 09-05-2017, 08:31 AM
 
24,247 posts, read 17,632,085 times
Reputation: 9170
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
BLM is the 21st century example of the Civil Rights movement of the 60s. In fact in neither case is the limited access of black men to employment or economic opportunity really addressed, so the long term impact isn't going to be that different.

With up to 40% of black men in some cities neither working nor in school/training there will always be higher incidences of crime which will be used by institutional racists to justify higher levels of policing in black neighborhoods.

The biggest problem that black men have is the fact that large numbers aren't incorporated into the economic system. Hispanics, even Puerto Ricans, are less educated, but are more likely to have jobs.

Access to employment for blacks should be the #1 issue that people should be discussing. Resolve that and "black on black" crime, high levels of single mothers, and the other ills will be vastly reduced.

There is a huge drop in stop and frisk in NYC but the position of poor black men remains as dire as it ever was.
Many of the Black men I know in the South and in the West achieved middle class status due to military service. Those inner city men might avoid getting criminal records and go out for military service. And after there service is over use these benefits for college education, among other things.

Of course they should continue the fight against mass incarceration and police brutality.
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Old 09-05-2017, 08:37 AM
 
24,247 posts, read 17,632,085 times
Reputation: 9170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
That "personal buddy" aspect requires more appraisal. My Millennial daughter has noted the same thing, but she doesn't see a racially inspired roadblock to "personal buddy."

What she does see is that Millennial employers are more likely to hire persons who are very culturally similar and very much likely to engage in the same pursuits on and off work.

That's likely to preclude "urban" blacks, but not, for instance, the black kids I work with at church, all of whom live in the same McMansions, whose parents drive the same SUVs, who belong to the same $1500-a-month high school sports clubs.
Even if you're in a country where the vast majority of people are of the same race, people tend to hire people they personally know or who are from similar social circles.

By the way you can drop the use of the codeword urban. You can be living in the middle of a city and well off, and there are indeed professional urban Black people. You mean it's unlikely to include the most marginalized Blacks, the demonized "ghetto" people. But even there they have ways out of that.

I've personally known people who were incarcerated, and who did well in school in prison and who ended up getting financial assistance to go to college. I know several who after getting their BAs, got into graduate school at Columbia.

You do have people who work with those who have been criminally convicted in terms of reintegrating them into the broader society.
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Old 09-05-2017, 08:50 AM
 
20,202 posts, read 11,189,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Even if you're in a country where the vast majority of people are of the same race, people tend to hire people they personally know or who are from similar social circles.

By the way you can drop the use of the codeword urban. You can be living in the middle of a city and well off, and there are indeed professional urban Black people. You mean it's unlikely to include the most marginalized Blacks, the demonized "ghetto" people. But even there they have ways out of that.

I've personally known people who were incarcerated, and who did well in school in prison and who ended up getting financial assistance to go to college. I know several who after getting their BAs, got into graduate school at Columbia.

You do have people who work with those who have been criminally convicted in terms of reintegrating them into the broader society.

Is "ghetto" the word you want me to use, then? "Rachet?" (Which is derived from "wretched").


You know what I meant, but for your sake, tell me your mot du jour and I'll use it until the next person tells me that one's wrong for him.
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Old 09-05-2017, 09:54 AM
 
24,247 posts, read 17,632,085 times
Reputation: 9170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Is "ghetto" the word you want me to use, then? "Rachet?" (Which is derived from "wretched").


You know what I meant, but for your sake, tell me your mot du jour and I'll use it until the next person tells me that one's wrong for him.
Convicted felon, and now Yale law grad, must prove 'moral character' to join bar - Portland Press Herald

This convicted felon is a Yale law graduate. As I previously mentioned, there are people who work with those who have been incarcerated and a number of them have rejoined society. You can stop labeling these people as the other and realize they are people who need help.

And btw, plenty of Black people who have nice homes have poor family members or incarcerated family members. The two groups are not separate. I have two Ivy League degrees, and at my family gatherings I see people who have been convicted.

So that's another difference between millennial, the label of convict means a lot less and people are tearing down previous assumptions that a record means a be should never get employment again in one's life or that one should permanently be denied jobs over the minimum wage because of convictions. And guess who was disproportionately hurt by this? Black people.
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Old 09-05-2017, 10:57 AM
 
20,202 posts, read 11,189,074 times
Reputation: 20219
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Convicted felon, and now Yale law grad, must prove 'moral character' to join bar - Portland Press Herald

This convicted felon is a Yale law graduate. As I previously mentioned, there are people who work with those who have been incarcerated and a number of them have rejoined society. You can stop labeling these people as the other and realize they are people who need help.

And btw, plenty of Black people who have nice homes have poor family members or incarcerated family members. The two groups are not separate. I have two Ivy League degrees, and at my family gatherings I see people who have been convicted.

So that's another difference between millennial, the label of convict means a lot less and people are tearing down previous assumptions that a record means a be should never get employment again in one's life or that one should permanently be denied jobs over the minimum wage because of convictions. And guess who was disproportionately hurt by this? Black people.
Non sequitur to anything I said.
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Old 09-05-2017, 03:46 PM
 
24,247 posts, read 17,632,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Non sequitur to anything I said.
I think there's a bit of class prejudice on this thread from some people, not to mention dehumanization of poor Black people. Yes poor Black people from the so called wrong side of town can and do get professional jobs. It will take a lot of work and they most likely need a lot of support but it happens.
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Old 09-05-2017, 04:31 PM
 
56,708 posts, read 81,017,273 times
Reputation: 12548
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Or you can leave the sexism out. If a woman has an idea for a business, there's nothing wrong with her hiring people of either gender.

And while having more small businesses might help, keep in mind small businesses pay the minimum wage, often offer no benefits or promotion either.

Creating lots of small businesses ALONE isn't going to do much to reduce poverty among African Americans. Arguably the GI Bill has done a lot more to boost African Americans into the middle class (or people of any race).

Veterans get free medical care, the military pays for their college, gets them subsidized mortgages, and those injured or who suffered medical issues get military disability. Spouses who take care of elderly military veterans get cash benefits.

I personally have known military veterans at top universities in the nation, and this was paid for by the government.
No sexism, but my point is that there needs to be a specific plan in order to integrate said folks into the workforce and small business, if anything, is needed in said communities. Small businesses employ most people as well. I'm not saying it is the be all, end all, but small businesses have the potential to be bigger businesses.

I understand what the GI Bill has done, a son of a Vietnam vet, a brother of a Gulf War vet and as a vet myself. Ironically, my brother and I already had degrees when we entered the military and didn't get the GI Bill. I'm not sure what he got in the Air Force, but I got the Loan Repayment Plan, which pays a third of your college loans over 3 years. I did have to owe taxes for 2 of the 3 years, as it is viewed as being income. I say this to say that the GI Bill isn't given to all that enlist in the military. So, there has to be other avenues for the community to help built up its neighborhoods and allowing it to do so through regulations that make it easier, as well as through community institutions coming together in order to look out for the greater good.
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Old 09-06-2017, 08:30 AM
 
20,202 posts, read 11,189,074 times
Reputation: 20219
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
I think there's a bit of class prejudice on this thread from some people, not to mention dehumanization of poor Black people. Yes poor Black people from the so called wrong side of town can and do get professional jobs. It will take a lot of work and they most likely need a lot of support but it happens.
It occurs to me that you don't know what I meant by "urban," (which I put in quotes, btw).


By "urban" I'm not talking about either economic level or education. I clearly was speaking of culture. I even said "culture."


By "urban blacks" I was including you. From what you've said of yourself and your political-social views on C-D, they would not hire you either.
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Old 09-06-2017, 09:28 AM
 
24,247 posts, read 17,632,085 times
Reputation: 9170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
It occurs to me that you don't know what I meant by "urban," (which I put in quotes, btw).


By "urban" I'm not talking about either economic level or education. I clearly was speaking of culture. I even said "culture."


By "urban blacks" I was including you. From what you've said of yourself and your political-social views on C-D, they would not hire you either.
I went to Cornell and Columbia and I have no problem dealing with them and have already been hired by "them". When you make ASSumptions you make an @SS out of yourself.

I'm wondering if you've ever even worked. You do realize people don't discuss politics during interviews, and in many quarters it's considered unprofessional to discuss politics on the job? You're displaying an extremely low level of intelligence here.

First Lady Michelle Obama is from the South side of Chicago, now considered one of the toughest urban areas in this country. She had no problem being hired.
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