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Old 11-06-2013, 10:18 AM
 
637 posts, read 646,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
While what you say is true about the present, it is not so because of the history if race relations. Modern day Americans who are racist have a whole set of rationalizations why they are that way, none of which relate to the racial history of the USA. Americans who are racist would be anyway, regardless if there had ever been slavery or segregation. After all, the number of people in Britain, for example, who are racist is similar to the number in the USA, but Britain has no history of slavery, segregation, or any other institutionalized oppression.

????

Nearly the entire Caribbean (and the US) was a British slave colony. Perhaps you mean that there were no slaves in England itself.
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Old 11-06-2013, 10:25 AM
 
637 posts, read 646,389 times
Reputation: 959
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaleAdeyemi View Post
There isn't much contact to be honest. I didn't come to America to make friends and play racial kiss chase. I came to work. That's about it. If someone says hello to me I will say hello back. I'm not going to seek someone out just because we have the same skin color. I grew up in a tribal society not a racial one. Having black skin in Africa doesn't mean a thing. It's more about which tribe you belong too. The average African American, Afro Latino and Afro Caribbean would know very little about my culture. Culture is what separates us. Just like back home in Nigeria I have very little in common with an Igbo man..I am Yoruba. Our cultures are vastly different.

Tell it like it is. This may sound harsh but it is true.

When you are the only ones you are going to be more likely to associate. I have seen that with Yorubas and Igbos in the US who are not in areas where there are enough Nigerians that they can be Igbo OR Nigerian exclusively. I have seen the same thing with Latinos, Caribbean people, Indians from India, etc.

If you are the only two Indians in Kansas, then you are tight but if you are in Texas, you can not only find someone who is Punjabi but you can find someone whose family is from your grandma's village.

There are small "African" enclaves in places like D.C., Staten Island, Harlem, etc. but the individual groups interact with each other based on the presence or absence of their own people.
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Old 11-06-2013, 11:25 AM
 
6,572 posts, read 9,086,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaleAdeyemi View Post
There isn't much contact to be honest. I didn't come to America to make friends and play racial kiss chase. I came to work. That's about it. If someone says hello to me I will say hello back. I'm not going to seek someone out just because we have the same skin color. I grew up in a tribal society not a racial one. Having black skin in Africa doesn't mean a thing. It's more about which tribe you belong too. The average African American, Afro Latino and Afro Caribbean would know very little about my culture. Culture is what separates us. Just like back home in Nigeria I have very little in common with an Igbo man..I am Yoruba. Our cultures are vastly different.
I think much of what you're saying is related to coming from a majority black country in general. If you come from a country that's majority black then racial issues like we have in the U.S have never been an issue. So the focuse in majority black countries are on other things. I'd bet the black experiance in the Caribbean is similar to what you're saying because there blacks are also the majority on most islands.

Being in a country like the U.S where whites have been the majority and blacks having to deal with racism and having to conform to white culture has created a different mind set among Black-Americans. Because with racism being aimed at Black-Americans based on our blackness some degree of solidarity with blacks outside the U.S is looked foward to. But those Blacks coming from majority Black countries whether it's an African or Caribbean country may not have as strong a need to connect racially with Black-Americans unless there is a specific racial situation drawing them together.
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Old 11-06-2013, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Montgomery Village
4,120 posts, read 3,839,992 times
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It also depends on what age the Africans are when they come over.
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Old 11-06-2013, 02:40 PM
 
11 posts, read 28,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manhattangirl View Post
Tell it like it is. This may sound harsh but it is true.

When you are the only ones you are going to be more likely to associate. I have seen that with Yorubas and Igbos in the US who are not in areas where there are enough Nigerians that they can be Igbo OR Nigerian exclusively. I have seen the same thing with Latinos, Caribbean people, Indians from India, etc.

If you are the only two Indians in Kansas, then you are tight but if you are in Texas, you can not only find someone who is Punjabi but you can find someone whose family is from your grandma's village.

There are small "African" enclaves in places like D.C., Staten Island, Harlem, etc. but the individual groups interact with each other based on the presence or absence of their own people.
This makes sense. I've bonded with Igbos in America because we're Nigerians. Tribal affiliations are forgotten overseas..Just aslong as you're from Nigeria lol. Because we can relate..Even though we have tribal differences..When you get to America where things are so vastly different you literally have to become friends with your fellow countryman. not because they have black skin but because they are Nigerian like me and understand.
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Old 11-06-2013, 02:48 PM
 
11 posts, read 28,979 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I think much of what you're saying is related to coming from a majority black country in general. If you come from a country that's majority black then racial issues like we have in the U.S have never been an issue. So the focuse in majority black countries are on other things. I'd bet the black experiance in the Caribbean is similar to what you're saying because there blacks are also the majority on most islands.

Being in a country like the U.S where whites have been the majority and blacks having to deal with racism and having to conform to white culture has created a different mind set among Black-Americans. Because with racism being aimed at Black-Americans based on our blackness some degree of solidarity with blacks outside the U.S is looked foward to. But those Blacks coming from majority Black countries whether it's an African or Caribbean country may not have as strong a need to connect racially with Black-Americans unless there is a specific racial situation drawing them together.
Beautiful! I will say Caribbeans are slightly different though to Africans though. Many of them might come from predominantly Black countries but they descend from slaves as well. They should be able to connect with African Americans more based off their history of slavery and oppression. As an African I feel Caribbeans/Latinos are closer to African Americans than they are us Africans..You both speak English as the main language, You both have little TRUE African culture...Caribbeans/Latinos love to talk about their African culture but if you look closely most of it has be Europeanized and twisted. How many Caribbeans/Latinos truly speak any of the trible languages fluently nowadays? They are extremely similar to African Americans. They just don't like to admit it.
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Old 11-06-2013, 04:17 PM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,678,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaleAdeyemi View Post
Beautiful! I will say Caribbeans are slightly different though to Africans though. Many of them might come from predominantly Black countries but they descend from slaves as well. They should be able to connect with African Americans more based off their history of slavery and oppression. As an African I feel Caribbeans/Latinos are closer to African Americans than they are us Africans..You both speak English as the main language, You both have little TRUE African culture...Caribbeans/Latinos love to talk about their African culture but if you look closely most of it has be Europeanized and twisted. How many Caribbeans/Latinos truly speak any of the trible languages fluently nowadays? They are extremely similar to African Americans. They just don't like to admit it.
African continent is not free of slavery and colonization you know. You seem to forget the Arab slave trade which is the big overlooked elephant in the room for being the leader of worldwide oppression of African peoples and their descendants. Arabs and Muslims are still oppressing Africa and Africans. They also changed up and divided many aspects of African cultures.
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:43 PM
 
3,522 posts, read 3,930,376 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Do any of you live in places where the two meet? If so what have their interactions been like?
i'm both african and african american (work that out...) and in my experience, though the cultural divide is definitely significant, it's a much smaller gap than between africans and anyone else...

with the possible exception of asians.

but no real tension exists, i don't think. africans and african americans tend to have a 'live and let live' attitude towards one another.
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:42 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,619 posts, read 19,068,425 times
Reputation: 18963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Do any of you live in places where the two meet? If so what have their interactions been like?
Place: Los Angeles and Southern California

Interactions: I have dated a few African men who are Kenyan, Ethiopian, mixed Nigerian, Moroccan

I have friends (from college, workplace and from being neighbors) who are Ghanaian, Nigerian, mixed Nigerian-British, Kenyan, Moroccan, Ethiopian

I have attended several weddings between African men and African American women including family members who are married to African men.

We have more in common than not so I'm not certain what type of feedback you were expecting.
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Old 11-08-2013, 03:36 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,678,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manhattangirl View Post
????

Nearly the entire Caribbean (and the US) was a British slave colony. Perhaps you mean that there were no slaves in England itself.
That's not true. Various European colonial powers took advantage of and exploited and implemented institutions of slavery in the Caribbean.

And there were lots of African slaves used in Britain and throughout Europe going back to ancient times.

Also look up the Arab slave trade.
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