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Old 03-24-2018, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
I'd add that there were also French Huguenots (Protestants fleeing persecution from largely Catholic France) who settled in South Africa - you can see that in their names such as du Pre, Viljoen, du Tout, de Villiers, du Plessis. They've however integrated into the original Dutch Boer community and are considered to be Afrikaner.

An analogy to how Afrikaans developed as a language away from Dutch is seeing how Quebecois French developed and evolved from Metropolitan French - it developed in isolation from its origins and kept some original formats from hundreds of years, as well as adding some local influences into it.
I just realized --- du Plessis (South African) Duplessis - (Canadian) - similar, origin, very common surnames in the respective countries.
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Old 03-24-2018, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Montreal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
I'd add that there were also French Huguenots (Protestants fleeing persecution from largely Catholic France) who settled in South Africa - you can see that in their names such as du Pre, Viljoen, du Tout, de Villiers, du Plessis. They've however integrated into the original Dutch Boer community and are considered to be Afrikaner.

An analogy to how Afrikaans developed as a language away from Dutch is seeing how Quebecois French developed and evolved from Metropolitan French - it developed in isolation from its origins and kept some original formats from hundreds of years, as well as adding some local influences into it.
Except that Afrikaans has diverged much more from Dutch than Quebecois French has from regular, France-based French. Unlike Afrikaans, Quebecois French isn't considered a separate language from mainstream French, just a separate dialect.
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Old 03-24-2018, 10:22 PM
 
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there's really only one Dutch speaking country (Holland), while several countries speak English with much more and better employment opportunities
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Old 03-25-2018, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Montreal
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Originally Posted by 908Boi View Post
there's really only one Dutch speaking country (Holland), while several countries speak English with much more and better employment opportunities
You could say that there are one and a half Dutch-speaking countries if you include the Flemish part of Belgium. But yeah, the developed English-speaking countries offer way more job opportunities than the Netherlands and Belgium combined.
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Old 03-25-2018, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
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Originally Posted by yofie View Post
Except that Afrikaans has diverged much more from Dutch than Quebecois French has from regular, France-based French. Unlike Afrikaans, Quebecois French isn't considered a separate language from mainstream French, just a separate dialect.
Yes, that may be true in relative terms.

But I was told that Canadian films in Quebecois French, when shown in France, may have subtitles because of the differences in usage, vocabulary.
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Old 03-25-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Montreal
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Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
Yes, that may be true in relative terms.

But I was told that Canadian films in Quebecois French, when shown in France, may have subtitles because of the differences in usage, vocabulary.
I have heard of such things.
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