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Old 07-01-2015, 12:41 AM
 
132 posts, read 89,461 times
Reputation: 120

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Are suburbs in Nairobi completely car-dependent like American suburbs? Or are the suburbs there more walkable, more amenities, and such?

(This might be difficult to answer if you haven't seen how car-centric American suburbs can be).
I visit Kenya once a year for 2 months. I've been doing aid work there for the past 15 years. In all honesty, it's hard to explain the layout of Nairobi and it's suburbs. It's all sort of one, big jumbled mess of traffic and countless pedestrians. Youtube some videos of Nairobi traffic. It's a **** show. You don't want to take a bike onto Nairobi roads and there's no bike paths. Walking is certainly an option but that all depends on where you want to go.

The NGO I work for is based out of Karen. Karen is considered a suburb of Nairobi, but it's an hour's drive from the city center. I walk around Nairobi quite a bit. I walk around Karen quite a bit. It's relatively safe...as long as it's not night time. The best way to find out about Kenya is to go. I promise you, you won't regret it. Wonderful place full of life, full of challenges. It really is a life-changing place.
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Old 07-12-2015, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Nairobi
30 posts, read 35,452 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Are suburbs in Nairobi completely car-dependent like American suburbs? Or are the suburbs there more walkable, more amenities, and such?

(This might be difficult to answer if you haven't seen how car-centric American suburbs can be).
You need a car to get around. There is public transport, but if you look or dress rich, may not be your best bet.
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Old 07-12-2015, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Nairobi
30 posts, read 35,452 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by PBob View Post
I'm flying in to Nairobi at 2030 one evening, and flying out the next morning at 0530. I will have been about 24 hours in flights to NBO, so I will arrive "rested" and not in need of sleep. (1) Will I be allowed to stay in transit even if I am changing airlines, or will I need to pass through immigration (pay for a visa) and customs? (2) Is the airport open all hours, so that I would be allowed to re-enter the airport immediately, if not allowed to stay in transit? (3) What, if any thing, is there to do at the airport through the night?

I've been to Nairobi a few times, but always on an itinerary that permitted a stay in the city. Until this trip.

Thank you!
You will need to go through immigration. What you need to do is go into the office and tell them you only need to pass through immigration to get to your terminal. You may have to just apply for a visa if you get a difficult person. The guys manning the counters may be helpful, but you would rather just speak to the in charge. The airport is a very sad place to be, with 2-3 restaurants and no duty free especially after the fire.
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Old 07-12-2015, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Nairobi
30 posts, read 35,452 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
What is business economy like?

What is nightlife like?
Business is better than first world countries because we are in the growth stages. It is quite corrupt though with a lot of bribery rampant.

There is a lot of nightlife going on with regular concerts and activities. I especially like blankets and wine.
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Old 07-12-2015, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Nairobi
30 posts, read 35,452 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
IM doing a wee bit of research on coffee planters from Nairobi, especially the Harries family.. who lived there in the early 1900s.
I don't know much about the Harries family, but I know several farmers from around Nairobi, Thika to be precise, uprooted the crops in favor of bananas. The local KCPU was exploiting them and paid a meagre 1sh per kg (you'd need to supply about 100kg to get a dollar). When they revolted, they got a better rate of 40/kg, which was still lower than what farmers would make if they sold bananas. The investment was also considerably less, so they just abandoned coffee farming.

In the 1900s obviously most farms were owned by colonialists and some continue to exist (farmers not colonialists) in the Runda region. When I drive down to Paradise lost, around Runda, I pass by a coffee plantation, but I do not know who owns it.
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Old 07-12-2015, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Morgantown, WV
469 posts, read 418,847 times
Reputation: 641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veneficus View Post
Why is Tusker beer never for sale in the United States?
I bought a single for a couple of bucks at Total Wine in Florida awhile back. They don't sell it in a 6 pack though.
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Old 07-21-2015, 03:03 PM
 
1 posts, read 705 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sumranbi View Post
I don't know much about the Harries family, but I know several farmers from around Nairobi, Thika to be precise, uprooted the crops in favor of bananas. The local KCPU was exploiting them and paid a meagre 1sh per kg (you'd need to supply about 100kg to get a dollar). When they revolted, they got a better rate of 40/kg, which was still lower than what farmers would make if they sold bananas. The investment was also considerably less, so they just abandoned coffee farming.

In the 1900s obviously most farms were owned by colonialists and some continue to exist (farmers not colonialists) in the Runda region. When I drive down to Paradise lost, around Runda, I pass by a coffee plantation, but I do not know who owns it.
Hi Sumranbi. First of all I would like to say thank you for you have opened this topic and are answering all the questions. I and most of people (I guess) apreciate your kindness. I'm crazy about Kenya and I have been interested in all the conversation between you and other people here. :-)

I'd like to ask you some questions and I hope you will help me. I am thinking of moving to Kenya for living. I LOVE this country. I would like to live there, work, grow my children.. But now I am just starting to collect data. I am a young guy and seeing my future life in Kenya and I'm sure i am able to reach my goals.

I would like to tell you about me and what I want to do in Kenya and then I hope to get from you usefull information.

I'm a civil engineer in Finland (I'm from Finland). I have a high degree. I am planning to find a civil engineer job in Kenya or to start my own bussines. I am ready to do anything, I'm active and full of energy.

1)Is it difficult to find a job for civil engeneer in Kenya? And could you tell me please how much do civil engineers earn in average? Do they earn enough for living?

2)What kind of bussines can you advise people who come to Kenya? Is it difficult to start farming (any kind of farming)? What kind of farming can you advice? Is it hard to open a minimarket, a shop, a restaurant or a mini hotel ? what kind of business should foreing people bring to Kenya? Please advise me anything. Please give me much information. Please, I will apreciate.

3)May be in 10 years I will start earning enough to buy a house. How much should a Kenyan earn for having a comfort family house with water,facilities? for having a car? for support their families? for send children to a privat school and then to a university? Please help me with information!

Thank you Sumranbi, hope to hear from you soon
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Old 11-27-2015, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,951 posts, read 36,211,991 times
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For the record, I was going to visit Kenya in July/August. Broke my arm, and cancelled the trip.

I will try to go again, but no plans anytime in the immediate future. It certainly remains on my list of places to visit though!
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