U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-07-2015, 06:08 PM
Status: "I hate living in Georgia!!" (set 7 days ago)
 
47,980 posts, read 45,443,916 times
Reputation: 15310

Advertisements

One might want to look at this: Ethiopia, Long Mired in Poverty, Rides an Economic Boom
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-08-2015, 03:00 AM
 
Location: Sweden
1,446 posts, read 1,500,091 times
Reputation: 375
Nice!-




When I was there, the construction had just started.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2015, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,144,182 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rams_Lord View Post
When I was there, the construction had just started.
when was that? I was there January of 2014, and didn't see any obvious signs of it. Maybe I saw very early construction, but wasn't aware of where it was at.

I'm curious where they are building the line, for example, will it go through or near BOLE? Will it go out to the airport?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2015, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Minsk, Belarus
670 posts, read 730,483 times
Reputation: 554
For what I know, Ethiopia is a very poor country. Oh has things really changed? For those of you who have been: how does it look like?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2015, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Sweden
1,446 posts, read 1,500,091 times
Reputation: 375
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
when was that? I was there January of 2014, and didn't see any obvious signs of it. Maybe I saw very early construction, but wasn't aware of where it was at.

I'm curious where they are building the line, for example, will it go through or near BOLE? Will it go out to the airport?
I was there in May 2012, it started at the end of 2011/start of 2012. It's just one site I saw in a very strange area, maybe that's why you didn't see it

But maybe it could of been something else I saw
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2015, 10:30 PM
 
3,116 posts, read 6,833,192 times
Reputation: 1543
Modern day Ethiopia has many problems and all stemming from greed and or the need to keep things the same. The country is currently realizing some economic gains but people are still poor compared to Western standards but of course wealthy in many other aspects. When regimes span over 20+ years then switch for one reason or another and mainly impart as a result of war and there isn't a stable infrastructure to support changes any place will regress. Ethiopia like many 3rd world countries are behind also because of the lack of technology and lack of resources of the European countries (this is back to my point of keeping things the same).

I'm not sure why people are intent on making an issue over whether Ethiopia was colonized or not. Not sure why it is important for people to say that there weren't African Kings or Queens or that all of Africa was colonized and especially Ethiopia. Not one Ethiopian person will ever say that their country was colonized, a section occupied yes but colonized no. Hopefully some of you realize that Italians didn't invent coffee nor is it its birthplace, Egyptian cotton most likely is from all over Africa, nor is the leather Italians sell are from Italy, and the beautiful flowers Europeans sell and fresh fruit they enjoy is coming from Africa, some of you really need to read history books and the newspaper.

The Italians tried twice to take over the country and twice they were unsuccessful. March 1st does mark over 100+ years of the first victory of Adwa when men and women fought for their country and successfully kicked out their invaders.

Changes to any country is going to have to start with the native and or occupants holding the people in powerful positions accountable to making a difference and improving their country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2015, 10:57 PM
 
6,552 posts, read 9,067,154 times
Reputation: 2837
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlemissrock View Post

Most Africans and to a certain extent many historians see the scramble for Africa as the main reason of Africa's problems. Since Ethiopia was not colonized for a long time it should not have the same problem as other African countries.
The problems with Africa today seem to have more to do with the path to development taken by it's post-colonial leaders. Africans did inherit shortcomings from their colonial rulers but these shortcomings could have been over come if Africa's post-colonial leaders had chosen better economic policies like a mixed economy and some form of democracy. Instead they mostly chose state run economies and one-party rule.


Kwame Nkrumah's example in Ghana is an example of this. Too many other African leaders tried to copy him it seems.


Quote:
In the same year, Nkrumah visited the Soviet Union and returned much impressed at the pace of industrialization there. He came back with a rigid Seven-Year Plan. "We must try and establish factories in large numbers at great speed," he argued. State-owned companies and public authorities mushroomed in all fields. So did mismanagement and graft. The price was most painfully felt in the countryside as Nkrumah used cocoa revenues, controlled by the official marketing board, to cover the growing losses of public companies. The imposition of unrealistically low cocoa prices on farmers, combined with the bloated organization of the marketing board, devastated the industry. Many farmers switched crops altogether; others found ways to smuggle their cocoa through neighboring countries, where better prices were offered.

Commanding Heights : Kwame Nkrumah | on PBS
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 01:29 AM
 
56 posts, read 249,302 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by bayarea-girl View Post
Modern day Ethiopia has many problems and all stemming from greed and or the need to keep things the same. The country is currently realizing some economic gains but people are still poor compared to Western standards but of course wealthy in many other aspects. When regimes span over 20+ years then switch for one reason or another and mainly impart as a result of war and there isn't a stable infrastructure to support changes any place will regress. Ethiopia like many 3rd world countries are behind also because of the lack of technology and lack of resources of the European countries (this is back to my point of keeping things the same).

I'm not sure why people are intent on making an issue over whether Ethiopia was colonized or not. Not sure why it is important for people to say that there weren't African Kings or Queens or that all of Africa was colonized and especially Ethiopia. Not one Ethiopian person will ever say that their country was colonized, a section occupied yes but colonized no. Hopefully some of you realize that Italians didn't invent coffee nor is it its birthplace, Egyptian cotton most likely is from all over Africa, nor is the leather Italians sell are from Italy, and the beautiful flowers Europeans sell and fresh fruit they enjoy is coming from Africa, some of you really need to read history books and the newspaper.

The Italians tried twice to take over the country and twice they were unsuccessful. March 1st does mark over 100+ years of the first victory of Adwa when men and women fought for their country and successfully kicked out their invaders.

Changes to any country is going to have to start with the native and or occupants holding the people in powerful positions accountable to making a difference and improving their country.
Yes, I would say the main problem with Ethiopia is tribalism and a lack of resources. I mean, a party representing 6 percent of the popuoation rules the country. And before this it wswas the Amharas who ruled the whole of Ethiopia with an iron fist and have commited plenty of crimes against other ethnic groups to remain in power. Democracy will never work in Ethiopia because of ethnic superiority complex. I think Ethiopia needs a major culture change or else they will face inevitable balkanisation. Its quite sad how a few groups who basically share a commin origin, culture and alphabet cicould destroy themselves fighting for power. If the habesha people realised their common heritage a century ago and worked together to modenise Ethiopia instead of just fighting power, Ethiopia would have been a first world country. Ethiopians have no one to blame but themselves. Our ancestors have failed us

Last edited by UltimateLegacy; 03-09-2015 at 02:00 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,116,323 times
Reputation: 4555
I hear that Ethiopia is very safe. Is that true?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2015, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,144,182 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
I hear that Ethiopia is very safe. Is that true?
Just first hand experience from last year.

I walked around a lot during the daytime, and generally felt safe, BY AFRICA STANDARDS. But, I wouldn't say its safe by Asian standards by any means. By Asia standards, I'd say it has a similar feel to the Philippines or Cambodia in safety feel.

The problem with Addis Ababa is that there are very few streetlights at night. In addition to that, there are many spread out streets that have a very empty feeling everywhere. So, you have to be careful just wandering around at night, as that scarcity of lights and people, can be an issue.

There were also places that a tourist SHOULD avoid. The central bus station which is a bit chaotic, and the cheap market that is a good place to get pickpocketed.

BUT, in general, I didn't feel any sinister feel. People were nice, and I think crime would be more opportunistic. There are some pickpocket types about. They won't violently rob you in Addis, but you might get in a situation where someone might try to get that camera or wallet or cellphone out of your pocket without you knowing it.

That being said, nothing happened to me, but another traveler I met had his cellphone lifted from his pocket in daylight. For me, I went out with a few other foreigners, and was barhopping in a bit of dark spot of a busy place. Had a young teen come up to me, shout something in my face, I immediately made strong eye contact with him, and another traveler type I was with yelled at him, as as he was doing the eye contact thing, he had his arms reaching towards my front pockets - I had little of value on me however. But, still. That was after dark.

In short, its not BAD by any means. I heard often that its much better than most other African capitals. That being said, it's not Japan/Korea/Taiwan/Hong Kong by any means which always feel super safe no matter what time of day or night.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top