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Old 02-16-2016, 08:41 PM
 
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I have always gotten the impression that Africans are good at telling people what they think they want to hear..one African friend was always "setting up a plan" involving someone...In some situations when involving Afro-Centrist type Black Americans who have an "identity crisis"...they see the walking American Dollar Sign...

I was walking by a shop owned by a Nigerian woman once, the owner and her sister were sitting outside blasting Fela music
I was walking with a white friend of mine...I said "oh that is Fela, I have that song" the reply was "Where you from?" I said
"From this city, here" she said "No you are African!!" "THAT is your heritage" They both totally ignored my white friend...

I said to myself " Its cool that is my heritage but don't think I am going to by something in your shop to express my heritage." She was a seamstress and sold Nigerian clothing for men,women and children, they were nice outfits..

This same store was advertising guided tours to Nigeria for a down payment of $500.00 saying learn and experience authentic Yoruba culture witness traditional ceremonies all visas and documents will be taken care of..these tours got
cancelled due to civil unrest in the country...I am thinking like I am going to hand over $500.00 for a trip that might not
even materialize on purpose...

Now Sierra Leone is getting into the tourist act and there are some videos of some village chiefs reaching out to Black Americans...
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Old 02-17-2016, 09:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperiorMegaman View Post
Go to an Irish-American neighborhood, and people will say that they are Irish.
Go to a Polish-American neighborhood, and people will say that they are Polish.
Those are all recent immigrant groups. We have been in the U.S for 350+ years, since the beginning. We are American. This is a country that people can be from.


Quote:
African Americans can't do that because our culture and history was stripped from us.
We do not have a specific African origin in the first place. Dozens of different African ethnicities that spoke various different languages were brought together and created the distinct "black" group here in the U.S. If, by some miracle, a team of geneologists were able to trace the exact origin of every one of your African-born ancestors, no two of them would be from the same place. So what culture exactly are you talking about?

Our culture is the one that we created here from our experience.

Why are you all searching for an identity? What's wrong with being American black people?
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:08 PM
 
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People in America might refer to themselves as "Irish" or "Polish" or "Italian" but if any of these people went to those respective countries they would be considered Americans first and would have to adjust to those respective cultures...

After 3 generations you are culturally American...like it or not these are the facts....In the land mass known as the United
States, BEFORE the DELIBERATE CREATION OF LAWS TO ALIENATE, MARGINALIZE AND DISENFRANCHISE Americans with
with Black African heritage, Afro-Americans were fully integrated into the new society...(see Bacon's Rebellion)...

Since these practices are STILL going on, on 2/17/16...A counter-culture of opposition has developed in some segments of
Afro-American culture,which causes some to seek an identity elsewhere...

This can be compared to an abusive household, in other abusive households (Haiti, Jamaica, Bahamas, Trinidad) the abuser has abandoned the house or have been thrown out and the abused have taken over the house and became COMFORTABLE in identifying with that house as they are the majority in that house..

In the United States house, the abuser is STILL abusing,WONT LEAVE AND TOO BIG TO BE THROWN OUT and dosen't want the abused there and the abused are OUTNUMBERED so some of the abused react by identifying with their birth mother (Africa)...since the abused are abused because they look like their birth mother (Africa)...they say well lets just identify with her then. So you have Black Muslims, Afro-Centrists and groups like that..Pan Africanism..This is the psychology of
Pan-African ism among a segment of U.S. Blacks.

The other FORMER abusive households(Haiti, Jamaica,Trinidad,Bahamas) are too busy running their OWN houses to think
about their birth mother (Africa) since no one is reminding them of her with abuse..
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Old 02-20-2016, 02:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prospectheightsresident View Post
Now, I don't have a problem trying to learn about the different cultures of Africa, but that, in itself, coupled with being of African descent, doesn't make one an African in my book. Note, when I write "African," I mean belonging to a particular ethnic group native to the continent, not to some general term used by blacks in the US today.

By the way, I appreciate the back and forth in these threads and don't take your post personally. Hope you don't take mine personally, as that's not my intent. Still, please do continue with the same intensity.
I agree.


My African ancestry covers every thing from Senegal to the south east Nigeria/Cameroon border. Radically different cultures, as much so as the English are from the Greeks. This is true of virtually all descendants of the Transatlantic slave trade.


Given that ethnicity, and even clan, is vital to African identities, clearly our diverse backgrounds preclude us from being "African". This is not to say that we don't have varying elements of African culture within our varied heritages (which encompass everything from Buenos Aires to Montreal).


But folks need to face facts. Slavery and the post slavery experience has had traumatic and radical impacts on who we are. To the point that a black born in Salvador da Bahia has almost nothing in common with one born Los Angeles.


So to pretend as if there is a singular "black experience" which encompasses all of us is pure nonsense.


And equally nonsensical is the narrative that "we were Kings and Queens" before the evil white man snatched us away". It is the Kings and Queens who sold us. To the extent that some nobility were sold off, it was by a rival group who did so to destroy the group from which that nobility came from, to ensure access to their territory and its resources.




I don't see why some African Americans are so self hating that they look passed the rich cultural heritage which they have developed. And which by the way are much admired and utilized by other marginalized groups (the civil rights movement, ethnic empowerment, hip hop/jazz, etc.,). These people create a fictive Africa which NEVER existed, instead of drawing pride in the fact that, despite the huge obstacles, which are mounted and continue to be mounted against them, they have SURVIVED, with large numbers even THRIVING!
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Old 02-20-2016, 03:03 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
This can be compared to an abusive household, in other abusive households (Haiti, Jamaica, Bahamas, Trinidad) the abuser has abandoned the house or have been thrown out and the abused have taken over the house and became COMFORTABLE in identifying with that house as they are the majority in that house..

In the United States house, the abuser is STILL abusing,..


This is so true. In fact in NYC there used to be conflict between black Americans and Caribbean blacks over the strong national symbolism that the latter use. Some black Americans couldn't understand the whole symbolism around the West Indian Labor Day carnival, with its aggressive portrayal of national Caribbean identities. They interpreted that as a rejection of a "black" identity. Couldn't understand why a Jamaican would be "Jamaican" first and "black" second.


This is no longer true, and in fact a little secret is that not every one waving a Jamaican flag, is in fact a Jamaican. More than a century of inter ethnic mixing, and now many black American NYers can dig out a black immigrant distant ancestor if they wish, so these identities are no longer a threat.




It should be noted that within the Caribbean the two countries where "black" identities are most important are Trinidad and Guyana (voting is largely along racial lines). One might argue that it is the fear of an Indian abuser which causes this, and of course strong Indo identities are also a reaction to the fear of African domination.


But in the rest of the English speaking Caribbean and Haiti, where every one is "black", race ceases to be a galvanizing identity, though skin color might well be.
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Old 02-20-2016, 09:44 PM
 
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As an AA, when I was in the Bahamas, I was more conscious of being thought of an American with money rather than "black".
I have to say that when I went to a family reunion in the NYC area several relatives I met by marriage were from Jamaica and Barbados.


There was also Haitian Flag Day celebrations in the area and it was open to all, but in the local paper there was emphasis
on why Black Americans should come because we should be proud and appreciate that they were the first to throw off slavery...There, everybody waving a Haitian flag was not Haitian either.
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Old 02-20-2016, 09:50 PM
 
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A Jamaican friend invited me to her wedding, here was a wedding in a Black American Pentecostal church with a wedding
reception with half of the food being Black American and half being Jamaican and the music and dancing being half-Jamaican and half-Black American.
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Old 02-27-2016, 12:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
A Jamaican friend invited me to her wedding, here was a wedding in a Black American Pentecostal church with a wedding
reception with half of the food being Black American and half being Jamaican and the music and dancing being half-Jamaican and half-Black American.


Yes life has gotten better.


In 1980 it would have been a split gathering with one side fussing about the "coconuts" and the other about the "Yankees".


With the "Yankees" exclaiming that "we in America now, so turn off that jungle music", and the "coconuts" telling them that " all dem Yankee know 'ow fi do is live pan welfare".
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Old 02-27-2016, 03:20 PM
 
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Lol!!...I never knew the ethnic tensions were that bad back in the 1980s
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Old 02-28-2016, 09:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
Lol!!...I never knew the ethnic tensions were that bad back in the 1980s


Do you know that some Caribbean high school aged kids were attacked because of their accents, and it isn't like the black American adults prevented this? Haitians had it worst of all.


It was black Americans vs., West Indians vs., Haitians.


From what I hear the black ethnic hostilities in So FL are still bad.
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