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Old 04-05-2016, 01:17 PM
 
Location: USA/Ethiopia
141 posts, read 98,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
This is the trend I've noticed for all first generation adult immigrants from my own country of birth(Portugal), those not raised in the US overwhelmingly had(very few arriving these days) no interest in establishing meaningful friendships with people outside of their ethnic group initially. I do however notice a shift with their children raised in the US whom seem quite comfortable socializing outside of their ethnic group and most primarily identify as American, resulting in a significant percentage marrying outside of their ethnic group(in California primarily to Americans of European ancestry and to a lesser extent Latino ancestry).The vast majortiy though maintain some cultural ties to their ethnicity for three generations, although significantly decreasing each generation, and by generation four(even those whose ancestors are entirely Portuguese) the vast majority identify solely as American and have little to no knowlege or interest in their immigrant story.

How does that contrast with the Ethiopian experience? From what I gather you are a first generation naturized immigrant to the US like I am.
Yes, exactly like you. I was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. With Ethiopians my age or older, I still think the majority would rather not socialise with people outside their ethnic group, apart from maybe at work. I think the reason this still happens is because we are all pretty much found in Washington DC mainly, so they may find it hard to mingle with other people when there are loads of there own people there.

I think it is mainly the teens born in the US that socialise with people outside of their ethnic groups, although they have plenty of Ethiopian/Eritrean friends. Again because of the huge amount of us found in DC. When it comes to language though, I'd say around 80% of the teens understand it and around 20% speak their language fluently.
Most Ethiopians do however identify as Ethiopian regardless of where they were born as we are in general very proud people.
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Old 04-05-2016, 08:43 PM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
6,898 posts, read 4,230,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallol1 View Post
Yes, exactly like you. I was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. With Ethiopians my age or older, I still think the majority would rather not socialise with people outside their ethnic group, apart from maybe at work. I think the reason this still happens is because we are all pretty much found in Washington DC mainly, so they may find it hard to mingle with other people when there are loads of there own people there.

I think it is mainly the teens born in the US that socialise with people outside of their ethnic groups, although they have plenty of Ethiopian/Eritrean friends. Again because of the huge amount of us found in DC. When it comes to language though, I'd say around 80% of the teens understand it and around 20% speak their language fluently.
Most Ethiopians do however identify as Ethiopian regardless of where they were born as we are in general very proud people.
How many generation have Ethiopians been in DC.
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Old 04-06-2016, 03:01 AM
 
Location: USA/Ethiopia
141 posts, read 98,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
How many generation have Ethiopians been in DC.
Well I am guessing 2 at most. Ethiopians first started coming to the USA from the 1940's however the majority have came later than the 1990's.
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Old 04-06-2016, 07:15 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
6,898 posts, read 4,230,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallol1 View Post
Well I am guessing 2 at most. Ethiopians first started coming to the USA from the 1940's however the majority have came later than the 1990's.
It's too soon to tell what trajectory most Ethiopians will take.
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Old 04-06-2016, 11:10 AM
 
2,307 posts, read 942,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperiorMegaman View Post
Wish more black folks thought like you. The arrogance on this thread is unbearable.
There's no arrogance in affirming that pan-Africanism is a delusional fantasy.

We are, in fact, very different.

Speaking of Ethiopians, I am originally from Washington D.C, so I am very familiar with them. They are the perfect example of what I am talking about. They are entirely unrelated to us, not just in an ethnic/cultural sense, but physically.

Unlike west Africans, Ethiopians and other immigrants from the "horn" of Africa bear no physical resemblance to black Americans. One could make the argument that we are actually racially different. I can spot one from a mile away. I have even met people that were half Black-American/half-Ethiopian that were clearly "mixed", you could see the "Ethiopian" all over the their faces, and they did not appear Afr-American.

They also have the same irrational attitudes towards black Americans that most black immigrants from third-world countries have, i.e, pointing fingers at the social problems in our communities while forgetting about the squalor that they came from.

What would be the purpose of grasping on straws to contrive unity between ethnic groups that are completely divergent? What's the end goal?

Last edited by Tritone; 04-06-2016 at 11:29 AM..
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Old 04-06-2016, 04:10 PM
 
2,307 posts, read 942,097 times
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Originally Posted by SuperiorMegaman View Post
Actually they do--they especially look like African Americans who have a very significant and recent amount of European, Latin American, or Middle Eastern ancestry.
Not at all to me. They have very distinct features and don't resemble light-skinned blacks or multi-racial people.

I have never once mistaken an East African for American or vice-versa. They might as well be Chinese.

Quote:
To be able to stand up to our oppressors, of course.
This is the fallacy behind Pan-Africanism, the idea that we all need to unite to fight "oppression". That kind of thinking was more relevant in the early 20th century, but today I don't think we have any common goals or enemies. I don't even feel like I am oppressed in the first place.

Today, ethnic distinctions are just about shared culture, heritage and/or history. We do not have anything in common, and there is no reason to pretend that we do for the sake of fighting "the man".

Last edited by Tritone; 04-06-2016 at 04:20 PM..
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Old 04-06-2016, 06:45 PM
 
691 posts, read 918,542 times
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Originally Posted by Tritone View Post
Not at all to me. They have very distinct features and don't resemble light-skinned blacks or multi-racial people.

I have never once mistaken an East African for American or vice-versa. They might as well be Chinese.

This is the fallacy behind Pan-Africanism, the idea that we all need to unite to fight "oppression". That kind of thinking was more relevant in the early 20th century, but today I don't think we have any common goals or enemies. I don't even feel like I am oppressed in the first place.

Today, ethnic distinctions are just about shared culture, heritage and/or history. We do not have anything in common, and there is no reason to pretend that we do for the sake of fighting "the man".
This is a hold-over from the Social Revolution of the 1960s..."The Oppressor" who is he? what is his name?
where does he live? How EXACTLY is he oppressing? The thinking was all non-white people unite against the
European colonial oppressors or in the U.S. "The Man".

The thinking was too simplistic and one size didn't fit all globally. It ignored ethnicity and culture I think it was too based on what was going on in the U.S. and South Africa at the time.
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Old 04-07-2016, 03:30 AM
 
Location: USA/Ethiopia
141 posts, read 98,283 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperiorMegaman View Post
Actually they do--they especially look like African Americans who have a very significant and recent amount of European, Latin American, or Middle Eastern ancestry.
I have never mistaken an African American for an Ethiopia, vice versa. (I'm Ethiopian though)
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Old 04-07-2016, 12:14 PM
 
Location: USA/Ethiopia
141 posts, read 98,283 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperiorMegaman View Post
I used to live in East Africa and I was mistaken for Ethiopian, Masai, and Nigerian. A friend from c Cameroon said it was because of my height(6'8)
Well it depends then. When I say I can spot an Ethiopian, I'm talking about my own ethnic group and collectively all of the ones that come under "Habesha". Those are the people I meant when saying I would never mistake them.

My people in general are not tall at all, in fact probably one of the shortest in the world. But if you go to West (&South West) Ethiopia, you can find some of the tallest people in the world.

Ethiopians are very diverse people although 90% of the population are Cush/ites and Semites.
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Old 04-07-2016, 05:49 PM
 
5,180 posts, read 4,672,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dallol1 View Post
Well it depends then. When I say I can spot an Ethiopian, I'm talking about my own ethnic group and collectively all of the ones that come under "Habesha". Those are the people I meant when saying I would never mistake them.

My people in general are not tall at all, in fact probably one of the shortest in the world. But if you go to West (&South West) Ethiopia, you can find some of the tallest people in the world.

Ethiopians are very diverse people although 90% of the population are Cush/ites and Semites.
Welcome to the funny farm.

The demographic of the crack head nubian olmecs and other afrocentrics are mostly drawn from the most disgusting and despicable elements of society.

Afrocentrism is a mental disease, lol.

The sooner people realize that the better.
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