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Old 12-07-2016, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,206 posts, read 1,580,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Not true Immigrant and people migrating shape culture, the new country become a mix of cultures. St Patrick day is Irish, Halloween is has Celtic roots. A lot state dances are line and Squared dancing which is also Irish. I like to study all cultures not just Black related, so I looked into all that.


A lot of the tridional religious and sexual dances from Africa has huge effect on pop culture though out the Americas. US, Brazil, West indies and etc.



A lot of people don't know this but African religious express mixed in Black churches, which is way Black Churches are commonly and historically expressive with dancing, music and etc.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmmTMg3e5Uo

The dancing in Black churches contrast white American churches during the time. And general much of the West.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZMRrUOCXJs

Dancing become secular in Juke Joint after the civil war to the 1950's. This Help create The Blues, R&B and Rock and Rolls.




Also In New Orleans, New Orleans was govern by French and Spanish though colonial history which were less restrictive toward slaves practicing their African Culture than the British. Most slaves in New Orleans were not from Africa but the West indies which also held higher degree of African tradition.


New Orleans creole, Haitian creole, are mix between French, African and Native American words. New Orleans voodoo, Haitian Vodou, comes from West African Vodun. Basically African culture had strong influence on New Orleans.

Jazz came New Orleans, the instrument was European classic and Military but they played them polyrhythmic


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fv3OU1QBX8E



Traditional African dances are polycentric, Which contrast Ballet and Many European Folk dances. Both of these had major influence early 21 century American pop culture. A lot of music and dancing that came out of Black communities challenged Western mortality. So had hip movements, bending, vibration and etc


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RgcJyZA-rrE


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhKJbQ-dB3E

I was looking at Afro Brazil and Afro West Indian culture.

1. There's a Parallel between Brazilian Samba music and dancing, and American Jazz and Swing dance. They have no direct connection just similar roots which cause them to have similar to each other. Look at last video of Marble Lee she basically did a few Samba steps with out trying she was actually Tap and Swing Dancing.

2. Later with more connection in the modern world Funk and traddiational Afro beat have an influence on each other. During the 60's and 70's Black Americans started putting African prucession in music.

3. Ragge is influence and conneted with R&B

4. Hip Hop, Dance Hall, Brazilian Funk, and A lot of African pop genres Bongo Flava, soukous, Kwaito and etc are connected and parallels. They are very different but they have a similar anesthetic in stressing rhythm.
As a New Orleans native I must say that you hit the nose on your points. I will add that with Brazilian culture, thas a bid African influence, especially in the North specifically Bahia
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Old 12-07-2016, 07:54 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
Most people, and I reiterate MOST, are in business to make money. Capitalism and the churning of profits are their motivation whether or not the goods or services they render is a passion of theirs or not. The point that I reiterated was that people of color, whom are conscious to the fact that no matter where they are in the world as a person of color, we all share the same ancestral heritage and story for the most part can come together and share their love of cultural experience as well as capitalism. It has nothing to do with a jewish, latino, hungarian and afro-american group of businessman to your point. Have you in particular experienced what it is like to be black in brazil, or london, or peru? I think you discount the consciousness of individuals and the eagerness to learn about others whom are identical to them in the minority but from another country. Though we grew up in different countries our experiences are nearly the same. And sharing those nuances is what brings us together because no matter what you are still a black man or woman in those countries. That is from a macro level. Now how shall you like to dissect this from a micro level??
1. This makes sense I get it.(I'm not a visible minority but am a cultural minority)

2. I don't discount it I'm trying to gain insight.

3. Break it down anyway you want so far you're making a lot of sense.
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Old 12-07-2016, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
1. This makes sense I get it.(I'm not a visible minority but am a cultural minority)

2. I don't discount it I'm trying to gain insight.

3. Break it down anyway you want so far you're making a lot of sense.
Thanks and also I wasnt trying to demean you in any way. I think what most people dont get is how many blacks worldwide (even on the Continent) feel an intimate form of longing to not only understand but experience what other people of color experience in their cultures and societies. No matter where you are located, most blacks due to the cultural and socioeconomic conditions heaped upon us by the transatlantic slave trade feel a form of kinship just as any other ethnicity does.

For example, my first time in Rio was back in 1999. In Zona Sul, you didnt see many "black" Brazilians roaming Copa, Leme, Impenema, Leblon except when people would come down from the favelas (Rocinha, Vidigal, etc.) that were close to the beach. So when I went to Centro, Zona Norte, Vila Isabel, Manguiera I was shocked. I was introduced to people that looked like me. They didnt speak one lick of Engish for the most part but my friend whom was born there did. They of course we fans of what they saw of black American culture on tv, Hip Hop and some movies. They were also hardcore fans of Reggae. So we shared that initial bond as black people even though we didnt speak the same language. Over the years, since I frequent Brazil a lot now my friends have learned from my experiences as an American black man and I have definitely learned about the experiences of Afro Brazilian in Rio. The parallels in a socioeconomic sense are also a bit similar even though Brazil is not on the same level as the US economically. Salvador Bahia is a totally different animal as there are no more black people in one place except in Nigeria. I hope that kind of gives a bit of a micro level peak into what Im saying.
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Old 12-07-2016, 02:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AFP View Post
That's because they're not "European".
Now you see first hand why people around the globe are disgusted with One Wurld Gubbermint plantationization (particularly the version developed in the Americas, the U.S. variant in particular).

The plantation generations aka the afrocentrics.

Last edited by kovert; 12-07-2016 at 02:50 PM..
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Old 12-07-2016, 03:42 PM
 
332 posts, read 245,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kovert View Post
Now you see first hand why people around the globe are disgusted with One Wurld Gubbermint plantationization (particularly the version developed in the Americas, the U.S. variant in particular).

The plantation generations aka the afrocentrics.

Dude just stop. You contribute absolutely nothing of note to these discussions beyond your incessant rants of "afrocentrics" this and "afrocentrics" that.

Last edited by jkc2j; 12-07-2016 at 03:53 PM..
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Old 12-07-2016, 08:45 PM
 
4,434 posts, read 4,420,404 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
As a New Orleans native I must say that you hit the nose on your points. I will add that with Brazilian culture, thas a bid African influence, especially in the North specifically Bahia
I actually kind of view New Orleans in a similar vein as like an American Salvador Bahia. Both known for colonial European architecture and have the strongest African influence in their countries.
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Old 12-08-2016, 10:08 PM
 
691 posts, read 919,872 times
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I think people might need to make a distinction between what is generally African-BASED vs. an authentic African culture...
For example, in the videos above, the religious dancing in the church is African based, maybe a combination of dances from different cultures from Senegal to Angola. But culturally, it is American in a Christian church called the Holy Dance.

Diaspora black cultures may have similar based habits in their cultures which are African based, but not related to a specific
African culture. Now, I have seen West Africans visit Black American churches and appreciate the services. They got up and danced with the rest of the people when the Dance broke out. But culturally, they were still Ibo or Yoruba.

Music, singing and dancing seem to have the strongest African influences among Diaspora Blacks, but specific African cultures
are deeper than just singing, dancing and music.
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Old 12-09-2016, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Formerly NYC by week; ATL by weekend...now Rio bi annually and ATL bi annually
1,206 posts, read 1,580,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
I think people might need to make a distinction between what is generally African-BASED vs. an authentic African culture...
For example, in the videos above, the religious dancing in the church is African based, maybe a combination of dances from different cultures from Senegal to Angola. But culturally, it is American in a Christian church called the Holy Dance.

Diaspora black cultures may have similar based habits in their cultures which are African based, but not related to a specific
African culture. Now, I have seen West Africans visit Black American churches and appreciate the services. They got up and danced with the rest of the people when the Dance broke out. But culturally, they were still Ibo or Yoruba.

Music, singing and dancing seem to have the strongest African influences among Diaspora Blacks, but specific African cultures
are deeper than just singing, dancing and music.
Blacks in the Caribbean and Americas all share the same ancestral heritage as those native Africans as well as indigenous peoples. Surely you agree that one is born into and grows up in a specific culture correct? Everything is based off of something....

I mean eating pasta here in NYC at Cipriani's is not "authentic" because it was made here...in NYC. But the ingredients and recipes are Italian......
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Old 12-09-2016, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Hudson Valley/Upper Downstate/Lower Upstate
439 posts, read 255,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
Blacks in the Caribbean and Americas all share the same ancestral heritage as those native Africans as well as indigenous peoples. Surely you agree that one is born into and grows up in a specific culture correct? Everything is based off of something....

I mean eating pasta here in NYC at Cipriani's is not "authentic" because it was made here...in NYC. But the ingredients and recipes are Italian......
Good point.
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Old 12-09-2016, 04:44 PM
 
Location: West Coast
1,199 posts, read 2,195,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
Its interesting that when folks talk about pan African solidarity the focus is usually music and dance. This being the venue where most African influences have survived.


However African dance is more than singing and dancing. And even then we exaggerate. How many black Americans know or care about the music of Senegal, Nigeria, Congo or South Africa?


Let us discuss the very different forms of family structure which developed in black societies in the Americas where slavery existed in comparison with that of most parts of Africa. I suspect that Africans don't even understand the concept of "Baby Mamma", which is very widespread among blacks in the Caribbean, Latin America and also the USA.


That slavery thing that we went through was very traumatic and the end product was very different from the enslaved person who was brought to these shores.
There are Black Americans who love African music. I am one of them. Also, there are Black Americans who believe in marriage before children. Again, I am one of them. I know many Black Americans who share my values. Many people seem to think that we don't exist. Also, many of us realize that the African influence goes beyond music and dance. Faith, family, education, creativity, legacy, a love and respect for land, etc. These are values that Black Americans have, which in my opinion is definitely of African influence.
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