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Old 12-14-2016, 08:08 PM
 
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I remember several Africans explaining slavery from the African viewpoint, One friend said among his tribe, in the old days
it was reported that his great-great grandfather was warning his family and people "Don't go near the forts on the coasts because as of late, people were disappearing"

One African professor told me that the Africans of that era failed to look at the big picture. The had the idea "The enemy of my enemy is my friend" So when the Europeans armed on group with guns to raid another group, they thought the European group were their friends.

What was interesting was that the forts or the areas near them were associated with people disappearing, it makes me think that people were so isolated they didn't grasp the big picture of what was really going on.
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Old 12-15-2016, 01:22 AM
 
Location: Canada
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Delusional. Specially those that claim the Olmecs and other Native Americans were African.
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Old 12-15-2016, 07:55 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
I remember several Africans explaining slavery from the African viewpoint, One friend said among his tribe, in the old days
it was reported that his great-great grandfather was warning his family and people "Don't go near the forts on the coasts because as of late, people were disappearing"

One African professor told me that the Africans of that era failed to look at the big picture. The had the idea "The enemy of my enemy is my friend" So when the Europeans armed on group with guns to raid another group, they thought the European group were their friends.

What was interesting was that the forts or the areas near them were associated with people disappearing, it makes me think that people were so isolated they didn't grasp the big picture of what was really going on.
You may find this video interesting I find the opinion expressed @1200 interesting very common to blame all of the pain on the "Europeans" It doesn't seem to occur to her the benefit was economically symbiotic for the interests of a few individuals in power in Africa. Nice to see that this seems to be a healing experience for Dr. Aubrey.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSih5iffgvc
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Old 12-15-2016, 11:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
You may find this video interesting I find the opinion expressed @1200 interesting very common to blame all of the pain on the "Europeans" It doesn't seem to occur to her the benefit was economically symbiotic for the interests of a few individuals in power in Africa. Nice to see that this seems to be a healing experience for Dr. Aubrey.

Africans did sell slaves but with the context most Americans know of slavery gives a very misleading impression.

All most like Africans were uniquely practicing slavery, African gave European the idea that couldn't refuse , then African knew and co sign the racial caste system and dehumanization in America.

African was selling indentured servants, War captives, War captives are self explanatory but indentured servants are people who work off owed debt. Both are not a good situation but African Slaves went from indentured servants in Africa, where they had a better chance of gain there freedom, in general had more liberties. To a generational racial cast system in the Americas in a plantation system. That's a pretty big difference.

Slavery is something that was common all over the world Europe, Asia, Africa, and Even the America. The Roman Empire, Germanic Tribes, anglo saxons, The Vikings there was white on white slavery, Slavery was color blinded.

What happen was during the middle ages churches outlaw slavery to Christians, which was basically churches out law white on white slavery but not slavery. During the age of exploration Europeans went to slave market with people of color. Which was justify with new racist beliefs. First was native Americans in the Americas but native Americans were dying from old world diseases so European slave traders Switch to Africa.

Black Americans do put partial blames on the African states, but Black Americans Also realize the trade itself was exploitation. Slave traders were basically sponsoring wars. I honestly feel much more need to be thought in American school about the slave trade, Mention the slave trade and not mention the African states and the larger group most token and the African perspective. Is like teaching America was colonize but not by who or where the pilgrims came from.
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Old 12-15-2016, 11:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Delusional. Specially those that claim the Olmecs and other Native Americans were African.
Those aren't pan Africanist, those are racists don't mix the too,
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Old 12-15-2016, 11:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by saxonwold View Post
Oh slavery was a very painful and inhumane era, where millions of Africans were mistreated and enslaved as animals. This had a profound psychological effect to this day on the descendants of Africans in the New World! The pain was passed on from generation to generation, stories of longing were also told from generation to generation. So this feeling might be or is much stronger on Black people of the New World than those in Africa. Due to colonialism or colonialist style of education, the topic of slavery has not been discussed in Africa a lot or was simply avoided or overlooked. This was made purposely by colonialist powers in order to avoid revolts or rebellions. Remember the best way to conquer a people or a nation is to divide them. Many Africans are not fully educated on the topic of slavery due to the reasons I have given above. Nevertheless, the minority of Africans who are well educated on such topic, understand very well the plight of their "New World relatives" who want to re-connect and show empathy for them. It's all linked to education and information.
This

There are bad seeds on both sides that go by negative stereotypes. So you have to be aware of ignorance and shouldn't phase by it.

Usually the more educated have a much positive view of each other.
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Old 12-16-2016, 07:10 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
6,898 posts, read 4,235,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Africans did sell slaves but with the context most Americans know of slavery gives a very misleading impression.

All most like Africans were uniquely practicing slavery, African gave European the idea that couldn't refuse , then African knew and co sign the racial caste system and dehumanization in America.

African was selling indentured servants, War captives, War captives are self explanatory but indentured servants are people who work off owed debt. Both are not a good situation but African Slaves went from indentured servants in Africa, where they had a better chance of gain there freedom, in general had more liberties. To a generational racial cast system in the Americas in a plantation system. That's a pretty big difference.

Slavery is something that was common all over the world Europe, Asia, Africa, and Even the America. The Roman Empire, Germanic Tribes, anglo saxons, The Vikings there was white on white slavery, Slavery was color blinded.

What happen was during the middle ages churches outlaw slavery to Christians, which was basically churches out law white on white slavery but not slavery. During the age of exploration Europeans went to slave market with people of color. Which was justify with new racist beliefs. First was native Americans in the Americas but native Americans were dying from old world diseases so European slave traders Switch to Africa.

Black Americans do put partial blames on the African states, but Black Americans Also realize the trade itself was exploitation. Slave traders were basically sponsoring wars. I honestly feel much more need to be thought in American school about the slave trade, Mention the slave trade and not mention the African states and the larger group most token and the African perspective. Is like teaching America was colonize but not by who or where the pilgrims came from.
This was the most despicable part of the institution of slavery in the U.S. and other societies with a colonial past. The mixing of "races" taboo was particularly strong in the American south where the one drop rule was enforced. Americans have been brainwashed to identify primarily by race for a very long time and many are very attached to seeing themselves as "black" or "white". Remnants of the racial caste system still do exist and are passed along generation to generation but unfortunately most people can't recognize those biases.
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Old 12-16-2016, 07:28 PM
 
691 posts, read 918,997 times
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[quote=AFP;46513197]You may find this video interesting I find the opinion expressed @1200 interesting very common to blame all of the pain on the "Europeans" It doesn't seem to occur to her the benefit was economically symbiotic for the interests of a few individuals in power in Africa. Nice to see that this seems to be a healing experience for Dr. Aubrey.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSih5iffgvc[/QUOTE

Further down in the video, the guy does explain that the Africans had to have the chief's permission to
sell slaves and the some were kidnapped, war captives etc. What no one seems to mention in these types of things is the demographic. It seems that some highly educated Black Americans have these identity crisis and feel they have to go search and connect to Africa.

I wonder if it is due to social alienation and marginalization of being a black minority in America? I don't really I don't really hear of Jamaicans,Bahamians Barbados people having the need to make these trips and
it seem mostly women. Just an observation, not a judgement.
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Old 12-16-2016, 07:29 PM
 
691 posts, read 918,997 times
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But these women are unearthing new research and adding to history.
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Old 12-17-2016, 03:51 AM
 
4,434 posts, read 4,417,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
This was the most despicable part of the institution of slavery in the U.S. and other societies with a colonial past. The mixing of "races" taboo was particularly strong in the American south where the one drop rule was enforced. Americans have been brainwashed to identify primarily by race for a very long time and many are very attached to seeing themselves as "black" or "white". Remnants of the racial caste system still do exist and are passed along generation to generation but unfortunately most people can't recognize those biases.
I mean because people were Black in the Americas they treated bad. Caste is a class system.

Also recognizing diversities isn't a bad thing, whats important is how people behave and treat people that are different religions, ethnicity, cultures and etc. There's this thing now with the conservative far right wing approach diversity passive aggressively. By meaning their trying to avoid being tolerant of different cultures, religion and etc. So they would call diversity itself dividing when actually they dividing themselves from the diversity. The error is someone shouldn't have to be your identity for you to associate, befriend, date and etc. Some one celebrating their heritage and embracing diversity is not a conflict.

But one thing to note, The countries in the Americas are among the most diverse in the world in countries like Japan they weren't talk much about race much due it being predominate one racial group. That doesn't mean there isn't racism there it just means it's not much in Japan to bring it too the surface. So Modern America being diverse brings issue to the front.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=to_oTxiDueM


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGypStJx_1o


The issue with the one drop rule isn't that one drop makes you black, The issue was one drop of anything makes you that. In the US Blacks were always open to embracing mix people. how ever historically white America wasn't embracing of mix people.

Also in Latin America history with mixing and racism is a little different. They had far broader racial caste system because they divide people up into extra mix groups. And Depending the closer you was to white the more leverage you had in that society with black still being regard as being something negative.



http://apushcanvas.pbworks.com/w/fil...e%20System.gif




To day Latin America has far worst racial inequality than the US.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTi0ebKXrZM


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gh7c46U5hhY






Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
Further down in the video, the guy does explain that the Africans had to have the chief's permission to
sell slaves and the some were kidnapped, war captives etc. What no one seems to mention in these types of things is the demographic. It seems that some highly educated Black Americans have these identity crisis and feel they have to go search and connect to Africa.

I wonder if it is due to social alienation and marginalization of being a black minority in America? I don't really I don't really hear of Jamaicans,Bahamians Barbados people having the need to make these trips and
it seem mostly women. Just an observation, not a judgement.
I do not know what you mean by "identity crisis", but black people going to Africa to learn about their ancestry is not a identity crisis and pretty self explanatory.

Also there's a income gap, this would favor more Americans going than those in the West indies and etc.

If you did not know Red green, Yellow are pan African colors, most African flags are these colors, and Many in the West indies. This is also why reggae, dance hall music in the West indies associate with these colors.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMW6EW5hDcI


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e82VE8UtW8A



As I stated before it's not just African diaspora thing, There was mistreat of people during the colonization of Africa. The culture and history of Blacks in Africa itself was under threat, and some things like Great Zimbabwe was deny that Blacks even built it.

During segregation in the US, and colonialism in Africa and the West indies, black leaders started to reach out to each other.

Pan-African Congress

Their still injustice and discrimination but Today Pan Africanism is mainly people of African decent celebrating their heritage in some form.
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