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Old 12-21-2016, 05:10 PM
 
329 posts, read 244,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kovert View Post
The afrocentric freakshow crawled out of its rock right around the time of the elections, it seems that the racialists nuts are all part of the same collective.

The plantation generations, massah & his slaves & his dependents.
It's funny, when there's actual contructive dialogue happening you tend to always appear with the most random, basic and dumb comments. Why don't you go crawl back into your cubby hole and stay. Racist trolls I tell ya lol. They got all types of racist internet sites out there and yet this one goes out of his way to create an account to post on an African subforum on citydata. Terrible lol.

Last edited by jkc2j; 12-21-2016 at 05:21 PM..
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Old 12-22-2016, 03:10 AM
 
24,211 posts, read 17,604,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
I mean because people were Black in the Americas they treated bad. Caste is a class system.



The issue with the one drop rule isn't that one drop makes you black, The issue was one drop of anything makes you that. In the US Blacks were always open to embracing mix people. how ever historically white America wasn't embracing of mix people.

Also in Latin America history with mixing and racism is a little different. They had far broader racial caste system because they divide people up into extra mix groups. And Depending the closer you was to white the more leverage you had in that society with black still being regard as being something negative.



http://apushcanvas.pbworks.com/w/fil...e%20System.gif




To day Latin America has far worst racial inequality than the US.

[youtube]RTi0ebKXrZM[/youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMW6EW5hDcI


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e82VE8UtW8A



As I stated before it's not just African diaspora thing, There was mistreat of people during the colonization of Africa. The culture and history of Blacks in Africa itself was under threat, and some things like Great Zimbabwe was deny that Blacks even built it.

During segregation in the US, and colonialism in Africa and the West indies, black leaders started to reach out to each other.

Pan-African Congress

Their still injustice and discrimination but Today Pan Africanism is mainly people of African decent celebrating their heritage in some form.
I have been to many Latin American nations, and I disagree that they have far worse racial issues than the US. First of all reach country in Latin America has very different demographics, and politics. You cannot say the same things for race relations or other things throughout the same region.

As for the whole mulatto thing, I have never heard anyone call themselves or anyone else mulatto in Latin America . You sound like you've read books written by white Americans in the 60s.

If someone has obvious black features they call the person moreno (dark skinned) or negro.

With that said Pan Africanism is mainly people of African descent celebrating their heritage in some form, and Black people are not restricted to the US and Africa. You have many Black people in Latin America and the Caribbean.
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Old 12-24-2016, 08:19 AM
 
691 posts, read 919,373 times
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Where it gets messy is that what is considered "Black" in the United States may not be what is considered "Black" in some
Latin, Caribbean,African countries even though they all have an African heritage to varying degrees. When Americans go overseas
and inadvertently impose an American-centric definition of "Black" in the Caribbean and Africa, they run into problems.

There was a video documentary out a while back of some Black Americans who went back "home" to retire in Ghana. They were running around in African garb, some had dreadlocks..they stood out like sore thumbs in the market place as they were
lighter skinned than the average Ghanaian, they were not considered "Black" by the Ghanaians and were called "Obruni" or which translates as "white man", "foreigner", "not of the family". One guy looked like a light-brown version of Bill Clinton.

I think also, as it is Americans who usually have the money to travel to these countries, they usually export an American racial outlook with them.
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Old 12-24-2016, 07:54 PM
 
4,434 posts, read 4,418,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
Where it gets messy is that what is considered "Black" in the United States may not be what is considered "Black" in some
Latin, Caribbean,African countries even though they all have an African heritage to varying degrees. When Americans go overseas
and inadvertently impose an American-centric definition of "Black" in the Caribbean and Africa, they run into problems.

There was a video documentary out a while back of some Black Americans who went back "home" to retire in Ghana. They were running around in African garb, some had dreadlocks..they stood out like sore thumbs in the market place as they were
lighter skinned than the average Ghanaian, they were not considered "Black" by the Ghanaians and were called "Obruni" or which translates as "white man", "foreigner", "not of the family". One guy looked like a light-brown version of Bill Clinton.

I think also, as it is Americans who usually have the money to travel to these countries, they usually export an American racial outlook with them.
That is irrelevant if some is part black they are free to celebrate there ancestry

I seen that doc your talking about, Again there is more too that and I already touched on this in my last response, again there ignorant people on all sides. there are also welcoming and more educated people.

If a black African comes to the US he or she is going run into different black Americans some will be welcome them, others might be ignorant, may be disrespectful, call them name and etc. If a Black America or the African diaspora go to Africa he or she will run to the same welcoming and ignorance.

"Obruni" is a derogatory term to call some white in self let alone. Blacks Africans didn't live as discriminate minorities like Black Americans how ever they were basically depress majorities. Colonization was a act of racism and white supremacy views. It went to war and removed societies, destroy and raided property and art. colonize was treat against there cultures and tradition. there was also mistreated and human right violation.









What I realize is the mis communication between black Africans and the African diaspora cause ignorant people to actually pass the historical racist stereotypes on each other.


Black Americans who don't know African history with out being taught anything reinforce racist stereotypes that Africans are primitive. so the ignorant among black Americans would call some Africans African blank stretcher. which would represent ignorance

Black Africans who don't know much about black American culture and history can see black Americans as sell outs and had history with a the silver spoon, so they could end up mixing the African diaspora with view of colonial racism. and end of calling Black Americans "Obruni" which would represent ignorance.

Not all black people around the world are educated..... and Pan Africanism is center around education and communication.

The problem with your post your using ignorance as reason to be against pan African-ism when actually it's a reasons for it.

Another problem your post Your way over thinking thinking the acceptance thing. It doesn't matter what some body else think of you, your ancestors are you ancestors. And your not getting that because your arguing against your own false perception what you think Pan Africanism. I realize that when you said this.

Quote:
This naive attitude about "going home to Africa" needs to stop... I can understand it is a psychological reaction to racism and why it developed. But it is very naive.
That means you formed an error conclusion, this basically you want Pan Africanism to be and not what is.

Pan Africanism is people of African decent celebrating there heritage in some form. White racism literally have nothing to do that. People want to celebrate there ancestry because want to celebrate there ancestry.

I mention in a few post a while back of the far right there some conservatives who have this white guilt complex, they view blacks and other minorities as hating them, which is silly even if some one white ancestors actually was a slave holder it's pointless to have something against them and not treat them with love. But they have this complex so want to created false equaled of racism.

So things that have nothing to do with loving or hating white people, like black people celebrating there heritage, some far right wing white conservatives try to make it against white people or anti white. cause they want a false equivalence.

Again "Not that someone black can't be racist, but rather than the text book definition of racism of believing racial supremacy, they made of their own definition generalizing any one black who even utter Africa as racist. So it become no difference between some one Black who want to learn about their heritage or history from some black who hate or racist to to white people. "

Again "By that logic would make every white European history teacher racist, White chief that cook European dishes, writing books like game of thrones as racist. and etc. All which is silly and untrue statement. White do celebrate their heritage the whole concept of western culture is center around European heritage and their ties with each other."

I keep responding to you cause keep trying to make Pan Africanism as reaction against racism..... no. With or with out the history of racism some people of African decent are going to be into learning about their heritage. What happen was you connected to two unrelated this thing.
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Old 12-24-2016, 07:56 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,932,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamaicaOnTheHudson View Post



And? Your point is? China's vast too. It also has more than 50 ethnicities, .


So where are your ancestral ties in Africa and show me proof that these exist? Do you speak any of these languages, engage in any of these cultural practices?


Because as an expert of Africa you will surely know that ethnic (tribal) identity in Africa is of primary importance. You do know that Europeans drew lines on maps so that Yorubas in Nigeria feel greater kinship with some peoples who live in Benin, or even Togo, than they do with Igbos and others who live east of the Niger River.


I can tell you of many occasions where I have seen Igbo and Yoruba people express a strong notion that these are very distinct groups.


But yet you think that blacks are all one happy family. Tell me what you think that Jamaicans (if you are Jamaican) living in FL think of Haitians and black Americans.


Or why so many black immigrants, who arrived as kids into places with predominant black Americans populations, express the thought that the hostility that they suffered at the hands of the American black kids was as bad as that which they suffered at the hands of the white ones.


Pan Africanism might be an ideal, but the notion that it exists is a fantasy.
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Old 12-24-2016, 07:59 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,932,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamaicaOnTheHudson View Post
I found this post you wrote a few years ago. In it, you admit that there's a Black Diaspora. Unless, there's a country and/or continent named "Black", I'm assuming these Black Disaporans have roots in Africa. My question to you now, is what's changed in two years? Take yo' time...




If you read what I said you would note that I stated that we do NOT do much with each other aside from socializing. So in fact the Pan Africanism that you describe does NOT in fact exist.


Because singing and dancing is just that. Singing and dancing. Sadly we sing and dance in places where we usually do NOT own.
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Old 12-24-2016, 08:11 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,932,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
I frequent Brazil a lot now my friends have learned from my experiences as an American black man and I have definitely learned about the experiences of Afro Brazilian in Rio. The parallels in a socioeconomic sense are also a bit similar even though Brazil is not on the same level as the US economically. Salvador Bahia is a totally different animal as there are no more black people in one place except in Nigeria. I hope that kind of gives a bit of a micro level peak into what Im saying.



Go over to the Latin American thread on this same city-data and get ready to discuss racism against Afro Latinos, and you will see how fast it gets locked. Black Latin Americans say nothing in these forums, even though I bet they read them. So of course they admire the American black who is way more self confident in raising issues of racism, even if not highly successful in resolving the problem.



But tell me though. With its large population of Afro descendant Latin Americans in NYC, do you see any solidarity between these people and other blacks? I don't. If you want to start a fight just go over to a Dominican who looks like Zoe Saldana and call them "black". Its only the most enlightened who wouldn't accuse you of something not very nice.
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Old 12-24-2016, 08:13 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,932,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kovert View Post
Now you see first hand why people around the globe are disgusted with One Wurld Gubbermint plantationization (particularly the version developed in the Americas, the U.S. variant in particular).

The plantation generations aka the afrocentrics.


Maybe another thread is good for your right wing conspiracy views Try that Political Commentary thread which is all but taken over by the KKK.
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Old 12-24-2016, 08:15 PM
 
4,434 posts, read 4,418,883 times
Reputation: 3500
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
I have been to many Latin American nations, and I disagree that they have far worse racial issues than the US. First of all reach country in Latin America has very different demographics, and politics. You cannot say the same things for race relations or other things throughout the same region.

As for the whole mulatto thing, I have never heard anyone call themselves or anyone else mulatto in Latin America . You sound like you've read books written by white Americans in the 60s.

If someone has obvious black features they call the person moreno (dark skinned) or negro.

With that said Pan Africanism is mainly people of African descent celebrating their heritage in some form, and Black people are not restricted to the US and Africa. You have many Black people in Latin America and the Caribbean.
Historically no, but modernly it is worst, there a far worst racial equality gap in latin America Colombia, Brazil, Cuba and etc then the US.


There never been jim crow like racist system in latin America. but there is extreme colorism,


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S0ODz9aIQ_k

The moreno/mulatto thing wasn't my point but anyway it goes Black brazilians are more embracing there African heritage then Black Americans
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Old 12-24-2016, 08:21 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,932,888 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joy74 View Post
There are Black Americans who love African music. I am one of them. .


Not denying that but I wonder what will be the reaction if a DJ on a popular urban radio station began to play African music. Outside of a certain intellectual crowd I really don't detect a strong interest in things "African" among grass roots African Americans.


I went to several shows at Central Park in NYC with African artists, and I don't remember seeing black Americans there in large numbers, outside of the usual "Afro centric" intellectual crowd. I did see Caribbean people there, but that is most likely that the music is similar.


Hey its only the other day that reggae began to get some acceptance from black Americans (to Bob Marley's chagrin his American fan base remained very white).


To fix a problem let us be honest. There are frictions between black Americans and black immigrants, and between the various black immigrant groups themselves. So Talk of a Pan Africanism, which is confined to a small group, is fantasy.


In fact when one ventures into that America outside of the metro areas grass roots black Americans cannot even under stand the fact that a black culture exists that isn't American, and so they don't quite know what to do when they encounter a Caribbean or African black.
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