U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-03-2017, 01:22 PM
 
5,196 posts, read 4,679,942 times
Reputation: 1562

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
Okay. Just out of curiosity are you Brazilian?
Nope, these are misfits and losers of American society, who are crabs in a bucket that try to pull as many down as they can.

The one thing under the sun they won't claim is personal responsibility.

The afronut kryponite.

"Federal data confirms that 73 percent of African-American births in 2010 were out of wedlock. Estimates for the percentage of African-American children growing up in single-parent households are slightly lower, at 67 percent."

Politifact
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-04-2017, 11:14 AM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
I won't defend the post to which you're responding. But what about the fact that African-Americans are doing far better than their African counterparts?




Given that the USA is the world's most powerful nation, and one of the most developed one would think that those who live here would be better off than those living in most places.


Your point?


Are you suggesting that African Americans, 80% of whom descend from people who arrived when this nation was still 13 British colonies, should shut up and say nothing, because others see them as African immigrants, so should shut up and just accept their lot?




Funny that white Americans, considerably more recent on the whole, are never told to go back to Europe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 11:32 AM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
They see all 3 of them as women of partial African ancestry is the point. The terminology is irreverent.

In the US black people also call each other red and Yellow and etc, because that's referring to skin color, "BlacK' is not referring to skin color in the US it refer to ancestry. People can call themselves green



Again To be black means your "mande, Yoruba etc etc decent" His Blackness is Temne

As far a racism goes the racism in the Americas was different from the racism in Africa during colonization.,


Rihanna being a "red woman" in Barbados is put into a separate "racial" category. She isn't merely a light skinned black. In many parts of the Caribbean some one looking like Alicia Keyes, or even Halle Berry, would be seriously confused as to why you would consider them "black".


Now some "red" people self identify as black, and some don't. This largely depends on their family culture, the closeness of ties with black family members, or the degree to which they have traveled beyond the Caribbean, or the political ideology. I will expect Rihanna to self identify as "black" given her close ties to her black mother, her troubled ties to her "red" father, and her massively heavy exposure to US patterns of racial identity.






This is my point about blacks needing to understand that each black society has its own heritages which in turn informs identity formation.


Go to Nigeria and tell an Igbo that they should embrace a Hausa and adapt being "black" as their primary identity and they will see you as being mad. You are aware of the ethno-religious violence which has occurred in Nigeria, and I am not talking about extremists like Boko Haram.


Blacks need to understand that there is no universal from of identity formation that works throughout the world. In Africa ethnicity is way more important. In Latin America few want to be black, so look for the most minute evidence of non black heritage, and until recently, there was very weak identity formation based on "blackness". In the non Hispanic Caribbean mulattos evolved as a buffer group between the numerically dominant black population and the minute white population. In the USA a "one drop rule" was developed as part of Jim Crow, to curb the growing power of mulattos.




So we need to respect that the role of "blackness" differs depending on where one is. Some one screaming that a Temne is "black" might have you classified as mad. They know they are just as they know that most whites have brown hair. To them skin color is no more important in identity formation than is hair color for whites.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 11:44 AM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
The vast majority of Afro-Brazilians are primarily of Portuguese descent there is no such thing as the one drop rule in Brazil all Brazilians of Colonial descent have African ancestors. Sadly there is a social hierarchy that favors those with more European features. The premise of the reporter from Al Jazeera is that that 51% of Brazilians are black.(Brazilians typically don't see it that way). Another example of one culture imposing their racial views on a different culture. Brazilians will have to work it out for themselves and the American/Anglo model is nothing to be proud of.


Regardless as to the degree of Portuguese ancestry that people with African ancestry have it is obvious to some one who spends more than one second in Brazil that one's African ancestry plays a huge role in the degree of social upward mobility is available.


So 51% of Brazilians are not black. Only 6% self identify as black, but its easy to see that Brazilians of black and mixed identities are way worse off than those who self identify as white.


We can get into the "what do they call themselves" debate, which is always used by Latin American apologists to avoid discussions of the racism which pervades those nations. What we do know is that the darker one is the poorer one is likely to be.


In fact a new governor of Puerto Rico was just inaugurated. Based on those standing around him one would think that this was the inauguration of the mayor of Madrid. Your typical tri-racial Puerto Rican was almost totally absent.


And as to the Anglo American model. It has its flaws but the USA has done a much better job in allowing a black middle class to develop than we can see in Brazil. In 2016 "blacks" are way more visible in all aspects of the media, even as commentators on financial shows, than in Brazil where the few images that do exist are limited to stereotypical roles. To the point where if a black person is cast as a doctor that becomes some thing worthy of commentary.


Where are the Shonda Rimes and the Oprah Winfreys of Brazil? Or even the Tyler Perrys.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 11:53 AM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by SLIMMACKEY View Post
I see a sh%t load of solidarity. ..


With due respect to you I will not gauge the degree of one's black identity with the degree to which one identifies with American blacks.


1. AAs can often be just as xenophobic towards immigrants, including black immigrants, as any red blooded Trump supporter. And I have experienced this. Now less visible in NYC as the black immigrant descended population is huge, but its amazing the levels of ignorance that can occur in areas where American blacks are less exposed to foreign blacks.


2. Face it AA political leadership is atrocious and has damaged blacks in the USA, so if the gauge of solidarity is based on the degree to which one identifies with many causes then one is mistaken. One doesn't leave a country to migrate to another to wallow in self pity and hear endless wails about "the MAN". And I get the impression that many younger AAs are also sick of this, as indeed are others, but their racial solidarity leads them to say nothing.


Seriously what is to be gained by occupying Jeff Session's office? How does that help the biggest problem that blacks have, and that is the need to become fully incorporated into the economy?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 12:04 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Definitely in the parts of Latin America with fewer Blacks people would call Rihianna and Alicia Morenos (means Black).

They have clearly Black features, and people who are either white or white/native or native aren't into going into defining 50 shades of Black.

As for the Caribbean or Northern South America, depends on who you're dealing with. This seems to be an obsession of yours, what people are called. Why do you care?

Why do you care about any number of topics? Brazil, is a HUGE country, in fact the most dominant South American nation, and this is a MAJOR topic there. Google and check it out.

If one is talking about blacks/part blacks in Latin America then one would think that the focus would be on nations like Cuba, DR, Colombia, Brazil where the % of the population falling into these countries is large, and not Paraguay, or Argentina, where the sighting of some one with "negroid" hair is a major event.


In regions with large Afro descended populations (aside from the USA) Rihanna wouldn't be described as "black" in terms of her appearance. Now she might be "politically black" because of an ideological orientation and indeed this is becoming increasingly common in places like Cuba and Brazil where there is very open discussion of "black" issues. Or in the English speaking Caribbean where the stigma of blackness has declined and it might be more convenient for some one like her to identify with the 92% of the population which considers themselves to be "black/African".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 12:06 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
. I notice there's no Brazilian voice on this matter on these threads..


Given that most Brazilians communicate in PORTUGUESE that might be a major explanation for this. But just Google race in Brazil and it is very evident that this is a topic of INCREASING importance in that nation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 12:09 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
These Anglos (not just Americans, some Anglo Caribbeans on this thread) are only bringing up Latin America and putting it down as a distraction.

.


I will go out on a limb and call you a blatant liar. You know full well that on the US forums there is ample discussion of race. There is NO discussion on these forums about racism in Brazil.


One can only wonder why you feel compelled to state something that is so blatantly WRONG!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 12:16 PM
 
7,437 posts, read 5,937,902 times
Reputation: 3799
Quote:
Originally Posted by kovert View Post
Nope, these are misfits and losers of American society, who are crabs in a bucket that try to pull as many down as they can.

The one thing under the sun they won't claim is personal responsibility.

The afronut kryponite.

"Federal data confirms that 73 percent of African-American births in 2010

Politifact
Do you know that in the 50s when out of wedlock births were much lower any measure of the socio economic status of blacks would show that they were CONSIDERABLY worse off then than they are now.


In fact as recently as the 50s 5he vast majority of blacks did NOT complete high school. Now the vast majority of them do! Among blacks under 30 the college COMPLETION rates for black females has now caught up to that of white men!


The vast majority of blacks in the 50s were poor. Now less than 30% are. The vast majority of black females were employed as domestics. Now the vast majority are in admin support positions.


This is why the KKK continuously scream about out of wedlock births. What I find hilarious is that 10 years ago when they were told that substance abuse (drugs, alcohol, tobacco) had become WORSE among whites than among blacks they refused to believe this. Now the same conditions which led to increased out of wedlock births in the 60s are having the same impact now among poor whites in dying factory towns.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2017, 01:00 PM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
6,898 posts, read 4,243,943 times
Reputation: 5878
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post
Regardless as to the degree of Portuguese ancestry that people with African ancestry have it is obvious to some one who spends more than one second in Brazil that one's African ancestry plays a huge role in the degree of social upward mobility is available.


So 51% of Brazilians are not black. Only 6% self identify as black, but its easy to see that Brazilians of black and mixed identities are way worse off than those who self identify as white.


We can get into the "what do they call themselves" debate, which is always used by Latin American apologists to avoid discussions of the racism which pervades those nations. What we do know is that the darker one is the poorer one is likely to be.


In fact a new governor of Puerto Rico was just inaugurated. Based on those standing around him one would think that this was the inauguration of the mayor of Madrid. Your typical tri-racial Puerto Rican was almost totally absent.


And as to the Anglo American model. It has its flaws but the USA has done a much better job in allowing a black middle class to develop than we can see in Brazil. In 2016 "blacks" are way more visible in all aspects of the media, even as commentators on financial shows, than in Brazil where the few images that do exist are limited to stereotypical roles. To the point where if a black person is cast as a doctor that becomes some thing worthy of commentary.


Where are the Shonda Rimes and the Oprah Winfreys of Brazil? Or even the Tyler Perrys.
I'm not Brazilian but dark Brazilians are under represented in the media. The closest I can think of is Gilberto Gil and Pelé.


The Anglo American one drop model is disgusting and is still alive and well I've seen enough posts on this topic by ignorant rednecks to verify that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top