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Old Yesterday, 10:08 PM
 
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This is the Africa forum, not the AA or the Afro Latino forum. Can we say off topic? But itís really because there are almost no Africans to speak in the relationship different African countries have with each other and how they perceive the African diaspora. So other people not African are trying to speak for them. Iíve not done extensive polling of Africans so I would lot know, not would anyone else here as they have not done extensive polling.

To represent there political and common interests, thereís an African Union.

https://au.int/en/home

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_Union

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan-African_Parliament

There are regional organizations too.

https://ecdpm.org/talking-points/reg...e-memberships/

Ghana offers citizenship to the descendants of Africa diaspora/slave trade.

https://face2faceafrica.com/article/...of-return-2019

That is definitely pan Africanist even if Ghana is the only country in Africa to offer a right to return.

So are regional and continent wide institutions.

Swahili was pushed as an unifying language in East and Central Africa.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swahili_language
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Old Yesterday, 10:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
Don Cheadle is 19/20% "White" would you consider him "mixed."


What on EARTH are you two even talking about? You two I lucky I can't find that recent genetic study on Aframs.
People Blacker than him from the Dominican Republic, Brazil, and Central America may call themselves mixed.

But in The Who cares either way, unless itís some benefit.
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Old Yesterday, 10:25 PM
 
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Like I said Pan-Africanism is mostly realistic for Africans in Africa/African leaders.
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Old Yesterday, 10:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
People Blacker than him from the Dominican Republic, Brazil, and Central America may call themselves mixed.

But in The Who cares either way, unless itís some benefit.
Reaching. But continue.
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Old Today, 03:01 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
Like I said Pan-Africanism is mostly realistic for Africans in Africa/African leaders.
Itís realistic fir whoever is interested in it. You have African Americans who have lived in whatever African countries for years ave who have lived it. Itís realistic for those people. People have the right to live where they want and believe what they want.

That is something thus forum struggles with. Whatever your opinions on on Pan Africanist, it doesnít matter because other people are also entitled to their feelings on it.
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Old Today, 03:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
Reaching. But continue.
There people who say anyone not charcoal Black is mixed. Not just Afro-Latinos, but African Americans.

Re: Sahel culture in Deep South? I think not. My family is from the Deep South and little exists in the way of African culture or religion outside Louisiana hoodoo and maybe the Gullah people. Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Uruguay, Brazil, Panama, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico all did better jobs in preserving African religions, art, and culture.

So did the Anglo, French, and Dutch Caribbean. African Americans are not culturally African. In the Deep South they are Baptistís with no trace of African religion, with the excerpt the Gulf Coast area which has a lot of Catholics and hoodoo practioners.
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Old Today, 03:11 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Due to geography , history, & formation of countries haved played a role in that presentation. Latin America received more African slaves historically & in the U.S their was more African blending of various cultures ( not in a context of more or less than latin america) in which spurred a unique cultural representation. We still have practictioners of Hoodoo, Artworks still reflect African styles, Spiritual or Gossip along with Blues & Soul music have the similar african themes. More African cultures then just NYC Blacks. Come down South brother.
In various religious rites Afro Latinos use Yoruba and other African languages. They still workshop the African hods which is not a thing among Southern Blacks. Southern Blacks and AAsvas a whole have preserved very little of African culture, and I say this as someone who has been to the Deep South, Brazil, Colombia, and the Dominican Republic.
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Old Today, 03:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post
The Organization of American States puts the number of afrodesendants in the Americas at 200 million.
if there are 40 millions in the US and six millions in the English Caribbean.

Where are the other 152 million?

As i said before, afro-descedants in Latin america are 3 times more than in the US.

You dont have to consider yourself black to participate and acknowledge that African culture is part of your culture, thats a myopic, binary mentality from certain people in the US.

That "all or nothing" mindset, is grounded in the one drop rule. The you are with us or against us, mentality.

https://www.oas.org/dil/afrodescendants.htm
Most African slaves were brought to sugarcane plantations in the Spanish and Portuguese colonies. Spain and Portugal were using African spaces before the British.
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Old Today, 03:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post
people dont call themselves black because they are not. there is no conspiracy only truth. why would they call themselves something they are not?

thats black american paranoia speaking.

The funny thing is that African american are convinced that latin Americans are ashamed of their black heritage but the fact is that latin american preserve MORE AFRICAN CULTURE than African Americans by a lot.


and thats particularly true with Dominicans, Puerto ricans, Colombians and Brazilians.

African religions are practiced, African cuisine, art, music. not all that southern fried stuff they call African in the US or that heavy deluded music they call african music in the US.

You only have to walk around NYC to see that basically the only stores dedicated to sell African religious ornaments and potions are ether owned by Africans themselves or by Dominicans/Puerto Africans , they call them "botanica" and they are everywhere.

Have you seen an African American inside one of these? never!!. AA are protestants and will never blend their religion with any of that.

Doing a drum circle on Saturday afternoon on central/prospect park does not count as "African culture", thats something Hippys do when they want to pretend they have knowledge of world cultures. very low bar right there.
Youíre right on African based religions. The only parts of the South were they exist among African Americans in large number us the gulf coast, which has heavy French/Spanish Catholic influence. The other heavy population of African American Catholics is Maryland and no African based religion there either. The majority of AAs outside Louisiana are Baptistís, though other Protestant denominations are represented.
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Old Today, 06:23 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
There people who say anyone not charcoal Black is mixed. Not just Afro-Latinos, but African Americans.
WTH? Don Cheadle can fit easily in Senegal, Mali, Northern Nigeria or Burkina Faso people who have Sudanid features such as himself. You bringing up, "well some Afro-Latinos with his phenotype deny being Black" is an irrevelant and fruitless point. Those Black Latinos just have an identity crisis is all. Not sure where you were getting at.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Re: Sahel culture in Deep South? I think not. My family is from the Deep South and little exists in the way of African culture or religion outside Louisiana hoodoo and maybe the Gullah people. Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Uruguay, Brazil, Panama, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico all did better jobs in preserving African religions, art, and culture.
So your family is suppose to be representation of AAs in the south

And the only ppl on your list that truly preserved their "African culture" are Afro-Cubans and Afro-Brazilians. The rest is just due to being from countries that have not had wide scale urbanization. Afram cowboy culture, certain architecture even among many things still have Sahel traits in the South. Even the going into trance in Baptist church has African elements try again.

But... Let me give one example.


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Quote:
Samuel Charters' love for Ed Young's Mississippi's fife and drum music led him to search for the roots of this African-American folk tradition. Based upon the performance of a group of Fula flute players from Guinea and the observation that a significant portion of early African-American culture descended from Senegal and Gambia, Charters decided to visit the villages of Basse and Diabugu Tenda in the Gambia's upper basin. Arriving there in November of 1976, Charters found the indigenous fife and drum music he was looking for. This LP, African Flutes, is a selection of ten field recordings that were collected by Charters during this stay with the Fula of Basse and the Serrehule of Diabugu Tenda. This sampling of Charter's recordings feature a number of incredible-sounding ensembles from both culture areas. Breathy flute melodies and churning calabash rattles expand and compress with one another in the five recordings of the Fula. Three interlocking drum patterns, a similarly breathy flute, hand clapping, anklet rattles, and female vocals characterize the overall sound of the five Serrehule selections. Charters describes both the Fula and Serrehule flutes as being handmade, wooden, about two feet in length, and having four finger holes. He notes that the Fula flutes are bound together with colorful strips of tape. Not exactly the biggest fan of Fula or Serrehule music, Charters described the calabash Fula rattle as being "a crashingly loud instrument" that projects a deafening "din." He also characterized most Fula music as "harsh and repetitive" and stated that the same description stood for the flute music that they played with "fierce energy." Unfortunately, as was -- and often still is -- the case with ethnomusicological and anthropological fieldwork practices, the names of the individual performers are not listed. The person who gets the credit for "discovering" these sounds is Charters himself. Certainly he deserves to be recognized for his dedication to documenting these fascinating sounds. But doesn't it seem natural that someone so preoccupied with archiving such music would care to ask the performers for their names? Despite this ethnographic oversight on Charters' part, and his often pejorative remarks about the quality of Fula and Serrehule music, African Flutes stands as an important collection of field recordings of the peoples from the Upper Gambia region of Western Africa. As is the case with all of their out of print recordings, Folkways will dub a cassette version or burn a CD copy of African Flutes should you decide to order one. See their website for details.
.
http://www.allmusic.com/album/africa...a-mw0000868047








https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDOnToguWPE
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post

So did the Anglo, French, and Dutch Caribbean. African Americans are not culturally African. In the Deep South they are Baptistís with no trace of African religion, with the excerpt the Gulf Coast area which has a lot of Catholics and hoodoo practioners.
African-American culture is creolized i.e African, European and Indigenous like all cultures of the African diaspora. Like I told you which you're not grasping our African cultural source came from an Islamic West African source and not a Pagan West African one which is why people like you think AA culture has no African influence. AA culture is unique in that regard. If you think I'm exaggerating I can post additional examples.
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