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Old Yesterday, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,156 posts, read 674,651 times
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I must remind people from all parts of the Afro Carribean & Latin America that geography & history is the molder of all our unique cultures. We have plenty of books that delves into each other cultures beyond mainstream media & local news. There will be various styles in each sub regions of your home country that's shaped differently. I'm about interested in all of it as I'm in African cultures.

We're bound to rub each other the wrong way due to various experiences ( culturally & individually) and different cuisines. No, this isn't a kumbaya speech just a remainder that there's knowledge to be learned from bickering.

I'm a Afram from & still lived in Northeast Mississippi. My state's Black culture as whole have one of the lowest diversity. So my chance of meeting a Afro-Carribean/Latin American will be limited and when i do meet one it's generally a moment before i realized it ( Accent is key). I would discuss general culture exchange & understand each other point of view.

They're people who might not know ir realize that Black Mississippians do have practitioners of different religions: Muslims ( spread out through the state but next religous group behind Christians) , Catholics ( spread out abit but concentrated in the gulf coast) , Hindu ( Temples in Jackson) , Buddist, & non religous ( believe it or not).
Hoodoo isn't practiced as a religion instead a spirituality. There's a website that dives into it. This have no ties but similarities to Voodoo ( New Orleans).
I mentioned this before & again, Spiritual music ( gossip) & Blues / Soul music are rooted in African themes. The way we worship is in African themes. Due to history of the states, African descendants had to learn english ( due to language barrier amongst themselves generally) and passed on some African words throughout generations & other terms simply was converted to english ( Anglophone). It's much more African roots in Afram culture then people realized just not much studying on a nationwide cultural level. That's why i recommend to young people ( especially Aframs) to study their american roots ( much more to it than just slavery). So we can share our culture with the Afro diaspora and build better understanding with each other.

Quick challenge for the non Aframs : Google images of cotton or field plantations back in the early 1900s of the U.S and tell me the first thing you see of Aframs that is a striking twin image of Africans doing even presently. It's quite obvious yet subtle but i wonder who's going to catch it first.

Last edited by Sharif662; Yesterday at 11:32 AM.. Reason: Spelling lol
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Old Yesterday, 11:32 AM
 
24,385 posts, read 17,804,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post
This is a great observation !!! kudos!

They will do anything to distance themselves from the real west Africa heritage. All that Muslim non sense is a fabrication of a bunch of preachers to avoid embracing Africa. But at the same time accuse others of denying their heritage. What a hypocrisy!.

Latin Americans have a great deal of verifiable, direct, and alive middle Eastern heritage, that heritage came trough the Spanish, (most of the Spanish that settle the Caribbean came from Andalusian) you can even heard it in their accent today. Dominicans and Cubans have an strong Andalusian accent and a have hundreds of Arabic loan words. Also latin american countries are full of Lebanese, and Syrians, they made big portions of the population and have influenced their culture greatly. BUT YOU WILL NOT SEE ANY LATIN AMERICAN CLAIMING TO BE A MOOR. Jajaja

This is the fascinating part, the people that have strong African heritage and strong middle Easter heritage, do not go around telling everybody that. only African Americans do that.

African Americans are like the vegans of the African diaspora.
Proof most AAs consider themselves Moorish or even care what a Moor is?

The problem here ya that some people cannot understand what one or 15 people do not speak for a group. Just because there AAs who forever reason identify with Islamic cultures does not mean all or even most AAs do.

Similarly you have some people making massive claims against Latinos on the basis of what a few internet trolls might say. Despise the frustrations of some Dominicans, the reality is they are culturally far more African than African Americans. So are Black Cubans, Brazilians, and other Afro Latinos.
Itís just the way things played out.

Now via Middle Eastern heritage in AAs, it does exist in some people. Via slavery I have some Sephardic Jewish ancestry, and I gained Spanish citizenship that way.

Some of the arguments here are inconsistent, because some of you want to label AAs as just African when it suits you, and mixed when it suits you.

You donít know when coming across an individual AA if they have Middle Eastern DNA or not.
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Old Yesterday, 11:50 AM
 
145 posts, read 36,292 times
Reputation: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Proof most AAs consider themselves Moorish or even care what a Moor is?

The problem here ya that some people cannot understand what one or 15 people do not speak for a group. Just because there AAs who forever reason identify with Islamic cultures does not mean all or even most AAs do.

Similarly you have some people making massive claims against Latinos on the basis of what a few internet trolls might say. Despise the frustrations of some Dominicans, the reality is they are culturally far more African than African Americans. So are Black Cubans, Brazilians, and other Afro Latinos.
Itís just the way things played out.

Now via Middle Eastern heritage in AAs, it does exist in some people. Via slavery I have some Sephardic Jewish ancestry, and I gained Spanish citizenship that way.

Some of the arguments here are inconsistent, because some of you want to label AAs as just African when it suits you, and mixed when it suits you.

You donít know when coming across an individual AA if they have Middle Eastern DNA or not.
Point taken, i would even say that the whole black Muslim thing is mostly a northern urban thing, i doubt there are many claiming that in the deep south.

But the point I am trying to make is that, why there is this need to fabricate those claims. We all know why AAs Do not want anything to do with the real African heritage, we all know how protestant Christianity treats that culture, we all know that it will be very difficult to re-conciliate both religions.

African culture survived in the Catholic world because the Church was more willing to compromise in order to convert. The church has been doing it for 2k years. Protestants are way more intolerant to paganism.
We all know how Protestantism is advancing in latam, and together with a general lack of time and interest is putting a lots of pressure. not only of African traditions but in all traditions.

African heritage is disappearing in latam, but not because of shame or denial, but because of modernity.
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Old Yesterday, 12:18 PM
 
145 posts, read 36,292 times
Reputation: 87
i would like to highligh how strong African culture is in latin america, because some seem to be under the impression we are talking about similar levels of influence.

we are not even talking about the same thing at all.

for example the photo below is the The Beri - Ny‚na, a demon from west Africa.
the demon is live and well, but not in Africa but in DR, where is the main character in some town in the central region of the country. 500 years later the demon is still dancing.


Caribny is one of the comenters that loves to argue that Dominicans deny their African heritage, but nowhere outside of Africa you will find so a wide display of pure African heritage, un-cut, un-diluted than in DR (and haiti)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipxwBda95M0
Attached Thumbnails
Pan-Africanism does it exist or is it a delusional fantasy?-papeluses1.jpg  
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Old Yesterday, 06:01 PM
 
111 posts, read 8,897 times
Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post
Dude, no African religious tradition has a strong presence in the US outside on New Orleans.
there might be some but is not wide spread, all those fabrications that you just posted about "muslim influence" in African-american heritage and the exaggerations of the religious practices in the south are another example of the constant fabrication and exaggeration of the African heritage.
Oh wow... I never knew religion was the ONLY thing entails whats African influenced. And don't you DARE talk about "exaggeration" or fabrications. Not only have I've done research on Afram culture/history unlike these self-hating Pan-Africanists but have actually lived it and experienced it being that my Afram side have RECENT roots in the South. You're not Afram but a Dominican/Latino who's only experience with Afram culture is urban AA culture or Hip Hop.

Yes, West African Muslims have a profound influence on ADOS culture. Any scholar who studies early Afram culture especially the Blues will tell you this. Also like I already said Hoodoo originated in the Mississippi delta(the birth place for most Afram cultural practices). I'll post sources later refuting this "fabrication" claim on the Islamic influence and Hoodoo being practiced. But for now I'll keep it short for you laymen. And use music for now.


Blues scale- African in Orgin.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blues_scale

12-bar chord progressions- African in Origin
</title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000" link="#000000" alink="#0000ff" vlink="#000000"> <basefont size="3"> <HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE> Common Blues Forms

Microtonal music(Forbidden in classical European music theory)- African in Origin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microto...ic#Terminology
http://sopranosaxtalk.blogspot.com/2...and-blues.html

Three chord progression- African in orgin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_p...d_progressions

Cyclic music structures- African in Origin.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycle_(music)

Using Ostinato patterns as a basis for improvisation.- African in Origin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ostinato

Offbeat syncopation- West African rhythmic concept
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(music)#On-beat_and_off-beat

Swing rhythm- African in origin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_(jazz_performance_style)

Call & Response- African in origin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_and_response_(music)

Homophonic Parallelism Singing(forbidden in European harmonic theory)- African in Origin
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homopho...nd_Asian_music


Quote:
Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post
As someone else pointed out, there is perpetual need to create a false narrative of "heritage" among African Americans.
No that's only by those self-hating Pan-Afrianists. True ADOS people know where their heritage lies which is the deep rural south. Something you're not apart of.

Quote:
Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post

I have seen all types of claims, from claiming that AAs were here before the Europeans, that AAs are the true native-Americans, that AAs are a lost tribe of Israel, that AAs are Moors ect ect you name it.
Now, Rafael... What does this have to do with the Sahelian West African influence on African-American culture.

But let me slap your claims around someone. This time going back to Hoodoo since you believe its not as "widespread."

[/b]




Mojo Workin': The Old African American Hoodoo System

Quote:
In this book, Katrina Hazzard-Donald explores African Americans' experience and practice of the herbal, healing folk belief tradition known as Hoodoo. Working against conventional scholarship, Hazzard-Donald argues that Hoodoo emerged first in three distinct regions she calls "regional Hoodoo clusters" and that after the turn of the nineteenth century, Hoodoo took on a national rather than regional profile. The first interdisciplinary examination to incorporate a full glossary of Hoodoo culture, Mojo Workin': The Old African American Hoodoo System lays out the movement of Hoodoo against a series of watershed changes in the American cultural landscape. Throughout, Hazzard-Donald distinguishes between "Old tradition Black Belt Hoodoo" and commercially marketed forms that have been controlled, modified, and often fabricated by outsiders; this study focuses on the hidden system operating almost exclusively among African Americans in the Black spiritual underground.


http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13697064-mojo-workin

If you listen to older Blues, they make many references to Hoodoo

John the Conqueror

John the Conqueror, also known as High John the Conqueror, John de Conquer, and many other folk variants, is a folk hero from African-American folklore. He is associated with a certain root, the John the Conqueror root, or John the Conqueroo, to which magical powers are ascribed in American folklore, especially among the hoodoo tradition of folk magic.



Black cat bone

A black cat bone is a type of lucky charm used in the African American magical tradition of hoodoo. It is thought to ensure a variety of positive effects, such as invisibility, good luck, protection from malevolent magic, rebirth after death, and romantic success.[1]

...Got a black cat bone
got a mojo too,
I got John the Conqueror root,
I'm gonna mess with you...

—"Hoochie Coochie Man," Muddy Waters
The bone, anointed with Van Van oil, may be carried as a component of a mojo bag; alternatively, without the coating of oil, it is held in the charm-user's mouth.[2]


Mojo (African-American culture)

Mojo /ˈmoʊdʒoʊ/, in the African-American folk belief called hoodoo, is an amulet consisting of a flannel bag containing one or more magical items. It is a "prayer in a bag", or a spell that can be carried with or on the host's body.

Alternative American names for the mojo bag include hand, mojo hand, conjure hand, lucky hand, conjure bag, trick bag, root bag, toby, jomo, and gris-gris bag.[1]


Goofer dust

Goofer dust is a traditional hexing material and practice of the African American tradition of hoodoo from the South Eastern Region of the United States of America.

You do know that African-American women in isolated rural areas of the South still do Hoodoo conjures? One example is putting period blood(gross) in food they cook to hex someone. So again stop speaking on people's cultures your not educated on outside Hip Hop musics.



Quote:
Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post

I only see that among African Americans, no one else in the African diaspora goes out of their way to fabricate cultural claims.
You mean like Jamaicans constantly trying to claim certain parts of AA culture? Like Caribbeans trying to claim that the Gullahs came from the Bahamas(when it was the other way around). Was it not Ivan Van Sertima who once claimed that the Mexican Olmecs were Black? Was it not Diop of Senegal who argued the Ancient Egyptians were Black but also argued Wolof a West African language is closer to Ancient Egyptian language? Oh I can go on. Stop confusing self-hating BHI, Moors or these Pan-Africanist Aframs for TRUE Aframs who know their history/culture.


Quote:
Originally Posted by upthere22 View Post


Thats why i made my point about all the fake "heritage" running around the African american community.
Oh you mean the fake Taino heritage of Dominicans? Oh.... I went there. Trujillo anyone? Whats you Dominican call yallselves again..." Oh right "Indio." So f**k outta here with "fake heritage."
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Old Yesterday, 06:07 PM
 
111 posts, read 8,897 times
Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
The fabricated claims towards a Islam weíre out-by groups like the Nation of Islam. People bought into this stuff due to shame if their heritage, since before WW2 most AAs still worked on plantations and did domestic work same as our slave ancestors. Education was essentially non existent up until the 79s. Notice before the Obamas all the self pro claimed AA leadership were ministers. Only know do have people like Harris, Booker, etc in the public domain who have advanced education.

The West African Sahel/Islamic influence on Afram culture has sh*t to do with the cult known as the Nation of Islam. Actual scholars have been noted the influence. This is what I mean with you self-hating Afram Pan-Afrianist who don't know crap about early Afram conditions.

Banjo

Quote:
The banjo is a four-, five- or six-stringed instrument with a piece of animal skin or plastic stretched over a circular frame. Simpler forms of the instrument were fashioned by Africans in Colonial America, adapted from several African instruments of similar design.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banjo

Mouth bow

Quote:
In the United States, the musical bow was apparently introduced by African slaves. Today, it is primarily found in the Appalachian Mountains, where it is called a mouthbow or mouth bow.
http://www.princeton.edu/~achaney/tm...sical_bow.html

Diddley bow

Quote:
The diddley bow derives from instruments used in West Africa. There, they were often played by children, one beating the string with sticks and the other changing the pitch by moving a slide up and down. The instrument was then developed as a children's toy by slaves in the United States. They were first documented in the rural South by researchers in the 1930s
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diddley_bow

The Quills(pan pipes)

The Quills are a early American folk panpipe, first noted in the early part of the 19th century among Afro-American slaves in the south. They are aerophones, and fall into the panpipe family. They are assumed to be of African origin, since similar instruments are found in various parts of Africa, and they were first used by 1st and 2nd generation Africans in America.
http://www.sohl.com/Quills/Quills.htm


Kazoo
Quote:
The kazoo is based on the African mirliton, and was a popular African-American folk instrument during the 1800's. The manufactured kazoo was invented by (an African American named)Alabama Vest.
http://www.kazoos.com/historye.htm

Blues Fife
Quote:
An old unique blues style in the Northern Mississippi hill country called Northern Mississippi Fife and Drum blues, is an offshoot of Fulani Flute and drum music. In fact, the physical construction of the blues fife played in Northern MS is based on an old African model brought over by the transatlantic slave trade. The construction process mimics that of the of Fula flute. A musician typically cuts a piece of cane about a foot inlength, then a heated iron rod is used to bore out the cane, and finally the same rod isused to make the manipulation and embouchure holes of the fife. No formal measure of spacing either between the embouchure hole and the manipulation holes or between each of the manipulation holes is used. Instead, the musicians use their hands as guides forconstruction, resulting in instruments that have slightly individualized scales, none of which are based on a classical Western model.
http://www.academia.edu/922424/_Stuf..._Fife_and_Drum

All of these instruments payed a key role in the early development of the blues...
"The Memphis Jug Band was an American musical group in the late 1920s and early to mid 1930s.The band featured harmonicas, violins, mandolins, banjos, and guitars, backed by washboards, kazoo, and jugs blown to supply the bass; they played in a variety of musical styles."


^^These are all early AA instruments that played a key role in the development of the Blues but more importantly they came from the West African Sahel which has Islamic influence. And when I mean West African Islamic influence I mean areas of West Africa where people practiced Islam i.e the West Africa Sahel.
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Old Yesterday, 06:09 PM
 
111 posts, read 8,897 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
This brother ( or sister) here shows what interest in one's culture will discover. Daps & love to you.

I'm just sick and tired of these self-hating Pan-Africanist and Latinos spewing disrespectful crap at real ADOS/Aframs. I noticed no one on this site has checked them and so I guess its up to me to do so. I'm only part Afram and I know more about Afram history/culture than this NyWriterdude cat.
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Old Yesterday, 06:15 PM
 
111 posts, read 8,897 times
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Also @Sharif662 noticed how these non-Aframs and NYCwriterdude tries to make us out like the "White people of the Diaspora." Or the "vegans." Or that we "hate Africans." Its especially coming from these Dominican posters when this type of mentality is not taboo among their people.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZDQjPX0-lE

I remember with Dominican model Rosa Acosta went to Africa(Tanzania) and she was getting flack by Dominicans just for going. Don't even get me started on their anti-Haitiano culture which is really anti-African and praise Spanish(and Taino lol). The very NERVE of these posters in this thread. These Latinos bragging about "how STRONG!" African culture is in Latin America. Meanwhile....

Black Life Is Cheap In Brazil as Police Kill 4,224 People In One Year
https://atlantablackstar.com/2017/11...ople-one-year/


Colombia: New Armed Groups Plague Afro-Colombian Zone
https://www.hrw.org/news/2018/12/13/...colombian-zone

Fighting for Black Lives in Colombia: At War’s End, the Search for a Seat at the Table
https://www.theroot.com/fighting-for...the-1796521962

They sure love "African culture" but not African people. If you love African culture so much how about speaking up for the people in which that culture comes from. Oh wait...
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Old Yesterday, 06:58 PM
 
111 posts, read 8,897 times
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Notice how many of these posters are ignoring the West African Sahel influence on Afram culture but are making up their own lies that I've never even said.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post
This is a great observation !!! kudos!

They will do anything to distance themselves from the real west Africa heritage. All that Muslim non sense is a fabrication of a bunch of preachers to avoid embracing Africa. But at the same time accuse others of denying their heritage. What a hypocrisy!.
What the f**k are you even babbling about? First off what the hell is "real West African heritage?" The West African region is not monolithic. It's diverse and bigger than Europe iirc. Angola, Coastal Nigeria and Benin don't constitute as the only "real West Africa heritage" which is where many of these Afro-Latinos cultural influences come from. This post shows me that most of you don't have a good reading grasp.

When I say "Islamic West African influences" I mean areas of West Africa where Islam was praticed not that islam directly had an impact on African-American culture. But more importantly countries/regions like Mali, Guinea, Northern Nigeria, Northern Ghana, Senegambia, and Burkina Faso had more of a cultural imprint on African-Americans then say Congo or Southwestern Nigeria. How the f**k is that denying African heritage???


Quote:
“Two American specificities can thus explain the emergence of the blues. Of all the countries in the Western hemisphere, the United States received the highest proportion of men and women from Senegal, Gambia, Mali, and Guinea; and it is also the only place where drumming was forbidden. So it is not by chance that the blues evolved only there. What makes this music so different from Caribbean and Afro-South American music is specifically the presence of Sahelian/Arabic/Islamic stylistic elements. They can be found in the instrument playing techniques, the melodies, and the singing style.”
https://religion.columbian.gwu.edu/a...im-experiences

So wait are you going to tell us that this is "fabrications?" Or this showing the differences of Afram cultural influence from African compared to the Cuban African influence.

Quote:
Afro-Cuban and African American music is very similar yet very different. Why? Because “essential elements of these two musics came from different parts of Africa, entering the New World by different routes, at different times, into differently structured societies” (Sublette, 159). These essential elements in African American music do not appear in Cuban music: swing and the blues scale. Cuban music contains elements of the clave (a rhythmic key) and “those undulating, repeating, melodic-rhythmic loops of fixed pitches called guajeo, montuno, or tumbao” (159). The reason for these differences was that they reflected two different musical styles that of Sudanic Africa and forest Africa.
I See Cuba: A Musical Tradition Revisited: African American vs Afro-Cuban.

For the last time for those who can't read African-American culture comes from the Sudanic region of Africa which had Muslim practitioners. Which is why the Blues did not have heavy drumming. Drumming wasn't even allowed but African string instruments were. Blues which is the grandfather to almost all Afram music genres.

But.... Who should we believe? Some random Latino who never grew up Afram or studied Afram culture? Or actual scholars who put time in researching Afram music traditions like the Blues.... hmmmmmmm... This one is hard.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post
Latin Americans have a great deal of verifiable, direct, and alive middle Eastern heritage, that heritage came trough the Spanish, (most of the Spanish that settle the Caribbean came from Andalusian) you can even heard it in their accent today. Dominicans and Cubans have an strong Andalusian accent (canarian accent is the most predominant) and a have hundreds of Arabic loan words. Also latin american countries are full of Lebanese, and Syrians, they made big portions of the population and have influenced their culture greatly. BUT YOU WILL NOT SEE ANY LATIN AMERICAN CLAIMING TO BE A MOOR. Jajaja
Uh...... Good for you guys.

But still fail because Mali, Guinea, Senegambia, Northern Nigeria, Burkina Faso,=/=Moors/Berbers of North Africa. Once again no one is claiming Muslim heritage you jackass.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post

This is the fascinating part, the people that have strong African heritage and strong middle Easter heritage, do not go around telling everybody that. only African Americans do that.
I dare you to give me a statical number of AAs going around claiming they have Middle Eastern heritage. The lies you guys bring into this "debate" is very telling. African-Americans must really hurt many of you latinos feelings.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post

African Americans are like the vegans of the African diaspora.

Really....? You mean the same exact people who fought against injustice world wide? Influenced activism world wide and even made songs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2HD4IvKjMI

The same people who made songs like this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bJA6W9CqvE

The same people who took Marcus Garvey in when his own people wouldn't? Our strong women who influenced the beauty of our natural hair to the rest of the diaspora?



Even influencing Black Brazilians?

The self-sufficiency of Black Panther’s Wakanda is inspiring Afro-Brazilians to look to their own
https://qz.com/1224485/black-panther...k-afro-brazil/

Quote:
Does Diosas al Natural have any ties to the U.S.?

Oh, yes! Kali is from New York, and we got a lot of love from “Diosas” from the U.S.! Of course, much of our inspiration also comes from the movement that really took off in the U.S. We are working to continue spreading the movement throughout Puerto Rico, the Caribbean, and Latin America. It’s beautiful how big the Community has gotten. We’re global!

We have also been working with Juan Carlos Coates, a photographer based in NYC, to capture some of our natural supporters in the Big Apple. That collaboration has resulted in some beautiful images, thus far.


Who organizes Diosas al Natural? Also, tell me a bit about your background.

Kali Blocker and Joaquin Medina are the creators of the movement. We both do the photography. I edit the videos, and he edits the photos. We share responsibility for running the page, event planning, etc. We are working on some merchandise for the Diosas, as well as a few events, one coming before the end of the year.

Kali: I split my time between fitness, natural hair and cultural events. I’m a personal trainer and have had my hand in the natural hair world for about 10 years. I do photography, v-logging and event planning. I graduated from Hofstra University, where I studied International Business with a concentration in Spanish. I’m originally from Queens, New York, raised throughout the East Coast. I currently reside in Puerto Rico.[/b]
Identity Rebirth: Interview with Diosas al Natural


We're the VEGANS of the Diaspora? Or what about how influencing their activism via BLM?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMP363Y-UeI&t=2s

Yet we're the vegans? I can go on and on but meanwhile... In DR.
The Dominican Republic’s Ministry of Education Released Video Celebrating Natural Hair, Hours Later Woman Behind It Was Fired
https://www.latinorebels.com/2019/03/26/naturalhairrd/

You non-Aframs/ADOS gonna learn to keep yall mouths shut when it comes to disrespecting Aframs when I'm around. I can't care which African-Americans hurt your "feelings" but the disrespect is going to be checked with a smackdown of facts.
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Old Yesterday, 07:01 PM
 
111 posts, read 8,897 times
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Also the reason these Latino countries "held on" to their "African cultures" so long is because they haven't even been heavily industrialized or urbanized especially Cuba specifically Eastern Cuba.

These silly ass Latinis are trying to say AAs deny "our African heritage" when AAs were the pioneers of Pan-Afrianism who Garvey was inspired by. I DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAREEEEEEEEEEEE EEEE these Latinos especially you sleek talking Dominicans to show us your version of Henry Sylvester-Williams.

Oh you guy's pissed off the wrong one. Again just your own version of Henry Sylvester-Williams. And not the many upon many Afram activists/pan-Africanists.
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