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Old 08-16-2019, 07:33 PM
 
117 posts, read 10,851 times
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Buh...buh...buh... Aframs are "fabricating and exaggerating!!!" "we're denying our African heritage!" "Wez wanan be Mooslim and shieeet!" "The NOI told us weez be Mooslimz." Meanwhile, what actual scholars say about the subject.


Quote:
“I did a talk a few years ago at Harvard where I played those two things, and the room absolutely exploded in clapping, because [the connection] was obvious,” says Diouf, an author and scholar who is also a researcher at New York’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. “People were saying, ‘Wow. That’s really audible. It’s really there.’” It’s really there thanks to all the Muslim slaves from West Africa who were taken by force to the United States for three centuries, from the 1600’s to the mid-1800’s. Upward of 30 percent of the African slaves in the United States were Muslim, and an untold number of them spoke and wrote Arabic, historians say now. Despite being pressured by slave owners to adopt Christianity and give up their old ways, many of these slaves continued to practice their religion and customs, or otherwise melded traditions from Africa into their new environment in the antebellum South.Forced to do menial, backbreaking work on plantations, for example, they still managed, throughout their days, to voice a belief in God and the revelation of the Qur’an. These slaves’ practices eventually evolved—decades and decades later, parallel with different singing traditions from Africa—into the shouts and hollers that begat blues music, Diouf and other historians believe.
Saudi Aramco World : Muslim Roots, U.S. Blues






.
.
.
Portraits of African born, Muslim slaves in the USA



Abdul Rahaman, 1828

Engraving of crayon drawing. A Muslim Fulbe, Rahaman was born in Timbuktu around 1762; as a child he moved to the Futa Jallon region in the present-day Republic of Guinea. Educated in Arabic and the Koran, in 1788/89, when around 26, he was captured during warfare and taken far from his homeland to the Gambia. Sold to the British, he was then taken to the Caribbean island of Dominica, where he briefly stayed, and from there to New Orleans, followed by Natchez. Enslaved for about 40 years in the U.S., mostly in Natchez, he was manumitted in 1828, and traveled to various parts of the eastern U.S. on his way back to Africa; he ultimately reached Liberia, where he died in 1829.




^^Already saying what I BEEN saying about West African Muslims(or West Africans from Muslim areas) influence on the Blues/AA musics. Hmmm......

Omar Ibn Said (Sayyid), mid-19th cent.

A Moslem from the Futa Tora area of present-day Senegal, Omar Said was captured in warfare and shipped to Charleston, S.C. in 1806/07, just before the abolition of the slave trade. He spent about 24 years enslaved in South and North Carolina. He originally wrote his account in Arabic in 1831, at around the age of 61; an English translation appeared after his death in 1864.




Yarrow Mamout, 1819

Yarrow Mamout was born in Africa around 1736 and was a teenager when enslaved and brought to America, apparently no later than 1752. His African homeland and ethnicity are unknown, and although he was brought to the Virginia-Maryland area, little is known about his early years in America. He ultimately lived in Washington D.C. and during his old age was well known in the Georgetown area, where he was manumitted from slavery in 1797. He was known as a devout Muslim and hard worker, and was able to accumulate some property. He lived the rest of his life in Georgetown, where he died in 1823 at the age of about 88.




Job Ben Solomon, 1750

Engraved drawing. A Fulbe from the eastern region of present-day Senegal, Solomon was a Moslem and literate in Arabic. At around the age of 29, while on a trade mission (which included two slaves he was going to sell to the English), hundreds of miles from his homeland, he was captured, sold to the English, and shipped from the Gambia to Maryland. There he worked on tobacco farms for about a year, went to England, and ultimately found employment with the Royal African Company in Gambia, where he died in 1773 at the age of around 72.





Muhammad Ali ibn Said (North East Nigeria-Chadian)







Ayo... @Sharif662 can I get some more ammo for my L86 LSW light machine gun? I ain't done spraying yet. We may have some survivors left. Mission objective is no POW....
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Old 08-16-2019, 08:22 PM
 
148 posts, read 28,068 times
Reputation: 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
Buh...buh...buh... Aframs are "fabricating and exaggerating!!!" "we're denying our African heritage!" "Wez wanan be Mooslim and shieeet!" "The NOI told us weez be Mooslimz." Meanwhile, what actual scholars say about the subject.




Saudi Aramco World : Muslim Roots, U.S. Blues






.
.
.
Portraits of African born, Muslim slaves in the USA



Abdul Rahaman, 1828

Engraving of crayon drawing. A Muslim Fulbe, Rahaman was born in Timbuktu around 1762; as a child he moved to the Futa Jallon region in the present-day Republic of Guinea. Educated in Arabic and the Koran, in 1788/89, when around 26, he was captured during warfare and taken far from his homeland to the Gambia. Sold to the British, he was then taken to the Caribbean island of Dominica, where he briefly stayed, and from there to New Orleans, followed by Natchez. Enslaved for about 40 years in the U.S., mostly in Natchez, he was manumitted in 1828, and traveled to various parts of the eastern U.S. on his way back to Africa; he ultimately reached Liberia, where he died in 1829.




^^Already saying what I BEEN saying about West African Muslims(or West Africans from Muslim areas) influence on the Blues/AA musics. Hmmm......

Omar Ibn Said (Sayyid), mid-19th cent.

A Moslem from the Futa Tora area of present-day Senegal, Omar Said was captured in warfare and shipped to Charleston, S.C. in 1806/07, just before the abolition of the slave trade. He spent about 24 years enslaved in South and North Carolina. He originally wrote his account in Arabic in 1831, at around the age of 61; an English translation appeared after his death in 1864.




Yarrow Mamout, 1819

Yarrow Mamout was born in Africa around 1736 and was a teenager when enslaved and brought to America, apparently no later than 1752. His African homeland and ethnicity are unknown, and although he was brought to the Virginia-Maryland area, little is known about his early years in America. He ultimately lived in Washington D.C. and during his old age was well known in the Georgetown area, where he was manumitted from slavery in 1797. He was known as a devout Muslim and hard worker, and was able to accumulate some property. He lived the rest of his life in Georgetown, where he died in 1823 at the age of about 88.




Job Ben Solomon, 1750

Engraved drawing. A Fulbe from the eastern region of present-day Senegal, Solomon was a Moslem and literate in Arabic. At around the age of 29, while on a trade mission (which included two slaves he was going to sell to the English), hundreds of miles from his homeland, he was captured, sold to the English, and shipped from the Gambia to Maryland. There he worked on tobacco farms for about a year, went to England, and ultimately found employment with the Royal African Company in Gambia, where he died in 1773 at the age of around 72.





Muhammad Ali ibn Said (North East Nigeria-Chadian)







Ayo... @Sharif662 can I get some more ammo for my L86 LSW light machine gun? I ain't done spraying yet. We may have some survivors left. Mission objective is no POW....
Dude, drop it, muslims had no influence in AAs culture, you can find some examples but it is a fabrication to say that influence was important.


you can convince yourself of whatever you want, but the fact remains the same. thats just a mental gymnastic to negate the pagan nature of the african culture hertitage in the American. you should be ashamed of your self of even proposing this. but hey! we all know the crazy fabrications AAs come sometimes ! olmecs, jews, moors, even vikings, all to negate africa and its culture.

shame on you!
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Old 08-16-2019, 08:29 PM
 
148 posts, read 28,068 times
Reputation: 80
All those are fabrications, just like rastafiriasm, muslim heritage, olmecs, aliens, vikings what else are you guys going to claim? to be descendants of the old greeks?

just accepte it, you dont want to be related to the true culture of africa and go in tangent looking for unknown characters deep in history to claim that those are the main influence in AAs culture and heritage. a bunch of BS>.


absolutelly no one buys your nonsense.
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:35 PM
 
117 posts, read 10,851 times
Reputation: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post
Dude, drop it, muslims had no influence in AAs culture, you can find some examples but it is a fabrication to say that influence was important.


you can convince yourself of whatever you want, but the fact remains the same. thats just a mental gymnastic to negate the pagan nature of the african culture hertitage in the American. you should be ashamed of your self of even proposing this. but hey! we all know the crazy fabrications AAs come sometimes ! olmecs, jews, moors, even vikings, all to negate africa and its culture.

shame on you!

@Sharif662 Notice how this dumbass Dominican(who comes from a culture of anti-Africanism) not only brings no counters to my argument but completely dismisses the source as "fabrication" just because HE SAYS so not only that he completely ignores the other materials I posted which shows the Upper West African influences on AA. Not only that but according to Grabandgo tiny and fiddle brain only "Pagan Africans" are "true African heritage" according to this moron. When I already posted a soure which states African-American/other Diaspora music traditions come from another source.

Quote:
“Two American specificities can thus explain the emergence of the blues. Of all the countries in the Western hemisphere, the United States received the highest proportion of men and women from Senegal, Gambia, Mali, and Guinea; and it is also the only place where drumming was forbidden. So it is not by chance that the blues evolved only there. What makes this music so different from Caribbean and Afro-South American music is specifically the presence of Sahelian/Arabic/Islamic stylistic elements. They can be found in the instrument playing techniques, the melodies, and the singing style.”
https://religion.columbian.gwu.edu/a...im-experiences

Quote:
Afro-Cuban and African American music is very similar yet very different. Why? Because “essential elements of these two musics came from different parts of Africa, entering the New World by different routes, at different times, into differently structured societies” (Sublette, 159). These essential elements in African American music do not appear in Cuban music: swing and the blues scale. Cuban music contains elements of the clave (a rhythmic key) and “those undulating, repeating, melodic-rhythmic loops of fixed pitches called guajeo, montuno, or tumbao” (159). The reason for these differences was that they reflected two different musical styles that of Sudanic Africa and forest Africa.
I See Cuba: A Musical Tradition Revisited: African American vs Afro-Cuban.


Once again who should we listen to actual scholars or some dumb low IQ island mongrels?

And if you want more "fabrications" how about the fact that Mandinkas who came from the more Muslim areas of West Africa influenced our southern accent according to real scholars.



Quote:
"... My first insight into the possibility of significant Mandinka content in the Southern accent occurred in one memorable conversation in Ziguinchor during 1972 with Buli Drame, the Mandinka from Suna Karantaba who guided me to the four villages I emphasized in studying Pakao. We proceeded to converse in French and he asked where I was from. After I told him, he slowly repeated after me, "St. Simons Island," pronouncing the words with such a strong Southern drawl that a chill ran up my spine. After years at college and graduate school away from the South, my own Southern accent had mostly disappeared. Yet Buli pronounced these and [End Page 351] other English words with a strong, seemingly perfect Southern accent, certainly an accent of the Georgia coast where Africanisms of The Gullah Dialect and Drums and Shadows both suggest a strong Mande influx and influence. One can debate how much a coastal Georgia accent resembles variable accents elsewhere in the South, but the accents of Charleston and coastal South Carolina and Georgia, spoken by both slaves and elite whites, were established before much of the inner deep South was settled.

This is not to say that a British accent or accents from African groups other than the Mande are not also present in certain Southern accents. Several informants from the 1930s in Drums and Shadows, from different ethnic groups as far south as Congo, a long way down the coast from Mande groups, note a strange system in which red flags were used, often hoisted onto slave ships anchored close to shore, as a method for attracting and capturing themselves or other unsuspecting children.81 Because these informants would have come from the very end of U.S. slave importation from Africa, Drums and Shadows perhaps implies this wildly random tactic was employed in the latter stages of the trafficking, as demand continued, but African importation into the U.S. had become illicit and, as Kyuk notes, many Congo were imported into Georgia. Buyers during the illegal era clamored for slaves, and slavers were so desperate they would resort to any measure, including red flags, to get captives on board regardless of ethnicity. After 1808 the old system of ethnic preferences in the slave trade began breaking down.

In any event, after that conversation with Buli I began to visualize and hear a heavy Mandinka content in the Gullah accent and thus in the "Southern accent" with all its variety. Pollitzer's slave importation demographics above favoring the Mande regions of Senegambia, Sierra Leone and the Windward Coast during the middle period (1749-87), and his literal analysis of Turner's Africanisms, showing the collective importance of Mande groups in Gullah speech, tends to support the idea of a predominant Mandinka and Mande content in the Southern accent, with the various other accents layered in (even without Mandinka informants identifying additional words, or the concept that the Mande influenced nearby ethnic groups in West Africa). Accent follows the vocabulary and demographics consistent with a Mande preference in Charleston and Georgia.

In various locales in South Carolina and Georgia, slaves so outnumbered white people, it is inconceivable for white English not to have been influenced by a West African accent. Turner noted some sections of South [End Page 352] Carolina where black families outnumbered white families twenty to one.82 Thomas Spalding's grandson, the ex-Confederate Captain Charles Spalding Wylly, wrote that the ratio on Sapelo Island was one hundred slaves to one white person, and asserts that these slaves had close, family-like relationships with their owners, implying close, verbal exchanges. "I have so often referred to the slave that I think it may gratify curiosity to tell in what manner these men and women fresh from Africa would with any safety be taken into the life of the family where in all probability there were not three white men to three hundred of their own race."83 Parrish notes there were 4,000 blacks and only 700 whites in Glynn County in 1845.84 A visitor to South Carolina in 1737 found the area more resembled "a negro country" than one settled by "white people," while the first federal census of 1790 established that 43% of South Carolina population were black slaves, compared to the national average of 18%. While the slave population in America declined to 13% (4,000,000) in 1860, South Carolina's slave population the same year had risen to 57% with even higher concentrations in the influential low country.85

Slave purchasers in the low country slightly preferred Mande not just for their rice farming knowledge and other factors, but once Mande came in sufficient numbers, they could communicate with the Mande slaves already working on plantations. Implying this possibility, Captain Wylly wrote a fascinating memoir detailing a training system for African slaves that is chilling for its racism and deculturization, suggesting a highly non-random process concerning the ethnic groups of slaves, at least for his grandfather, Bilali's owner. Wylly thought he provided a veritable linguistic blueprint for how the African-born slaves were gradually taught English. However, in so doing he inadvertently explains how a Mande accent might very well have entered Southern English, especially through the slave drivers, who were often African born leaders among the slaves, in charge of training the newly imported slaves.

After the African slaves were bought in the Charleston market, "the newly purchased were transferred at once to the plantation. Here always would be found a number of men and women acquired in former years who belonged to the same race, frequently of the same tribe and speaking the same dialect, or at least capable of making themselves understood." The African-born slaves were then assigned in groups of ten to a "driver" or leader "chosen for his ability to command and his fluency in speech."86 [End Page 353]...".

"...Spalding had about 400 slaves at any one time, and during his lifetime gave over 1000 slaves, and the lands they worked on, to his two surviving sons and four married daughters, disseminating the linguistic influence and west-Africanized accent of his system into the Georgia coast and the South, presumably alongside a number of similar examples from other plantations.88

Despite slavery's hodge-podge mixing of ethnic groups from Africa, evidence of a Mande preference among the Gullah finds additional support in the memoir of Sapelo Island's Gullah, or more correctly, Geeche writer Cornelia Bailey, who uses styles of basket-making, "Mende ring shout dancing," linguistic and other evidence to conclude that the Mende from Sierra Leone were a strong ethnic component of the heritage of African-Americans living on Sapelo Island. What Cornelia's people called "fanners"— shallow, flat baskets used for threshing rice—the Mende call fantas.89...".
Project MUSE - Bound to Africa: the Mandinka Legacy in the New World


"... Turner allows us to glimpse the process of Africanized thinking and culture seeping into Southern English and from there into mainstream American English. He forces us to go back and take a second look at American English, and start asking deeper questions about its African content. One west African linguist who has done this was David Dalby, among the earliest to point out that the widespread traditional Mandinka usage of "OK" mirrored its similar usage as one of the most characteristically American words in existence. Therefore, Dalby suggests, the very American expression "OK" must have seen usage first among Mandinka slaves in the South, who passed the expression on to the rest of us.54

In my fieldwork in Pakao, I found the Mandinka expressions OK, OK kuta and OK kuta bake (OK, very OK and very, very OK) to be widely used.55 The Mandinka signature on this expression, accenting heavily the second syllable, and often using the expression with the common Mandinka words kuta and kuta bake, help convince me this is not some absorption from twentieth-century America, but rather a descendant of the African precursor to U.S. usage. Even if a telegraph operator helped put the expression into common usage in America, then the expression could have been reinforced by usage among Mandinka slaves and their descendants, in the kind of cultural convergence already discussed above for mansa and massa. Turner himself does not single out "OK" as one of the Gullah expressions. It was so common he may not have thought to include it.[End Page 344]

However, Turner's discussion of the west African syntax in Gullah speech patterns provides a model for thinking about a west African derivation for other expressions commonly associated with Southern English. The widely used "y'all" may be another example of a cultural convergence, in this case between the English "you all" and the Mandinka "al," meaning "you all," or "y'all" and often followed by a verb. Thus the Mandinka say al ta for "Y'all go" or "Y'all git." They say al ku for "Y'all wash" and al jinan for "Y'all come down here." See this latter expression in Kadri Drame's account of Deskaleri the Mysterious.56 The Mandinka also use fo as their word for "for" in the sense of "until," for example, "I went fo the house" as in Southern diction. In his tale about "The Bwa or Cannibal-witch, Kadri Drame says that djinns "can only harass someone until [fo] their time of death has come."57 Fo also would be an example of a cultural convergence. Several of the Mandinka legends in Djinns, Stars and Warriors also use quotations one after another in rapid fire, preceded by "he said/says" or "I said/say," which was also a feature of Southern storytelling that I heard growing up.


The little known ante-bellum memoir of Ophelia Troup Dent of Hofwyl-Broadfield Plantation in Glynn County near Brunswick, Georgia, tells us that her slaves used "My little aunt" to address a wet-nurse of presumably lesser importance and age, and "My big aunt" to address the main female house servant... "

"...In addition to "Mom Betty," the Dent slaves used expressions like "My Big Aunt" and "My Little Aunt;" would they have also said, "my big brother" or "my little brother" or "my big sister" or "my little sister?" Such expressions are in wide use in Southern English. Both Ophelia Troup Dent and her slaves seem to have used "big" and "little" to distinguish kin on the basis of relative age and importance. This was done among the Pakao Mandinka to distinguish between older and younger brothers, sisters, and other relatives with the widely used kinship terms koto or doko, (older or younger sibling). Pakao Mandinka also usually preface their use of kinship words with "my" (n), as in nba or nbama for "my mother" or nkoto for "my big sister, or "my big brother" or ndoko for "my little sister" and "my little brother." "Little" and "big" are west Africanized ways of translating "younger" and "older.""


The accent evolved from Coastal SC/GA(where most the slaves were at the time) and then spread across the south. So once again keep my f**king ppl out your mouths and stick to your own damn culture Rodriquez.

Last edited by ADOSwarrior; 08-16-2019 at 11:53 PM..
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Old 08-16-2019, 11:51 PM
 
117 posts, read 10,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post
All those are fabrications, just like rastafiriasm, muslim heritage, olmecs, aliens, vikings what else are you guys going to claim? to be descendants of the old greeks?

just accepte it, you dont want to be related to the true culture of africa and go in tangent looking for unknown characters deep in history to claim that those are the main influence in AAs culture and heritage. a bunch of BS>.


absolutelly no one buys your nonsense.


Look at this little island mongrel with no arguments after being slapped around. Your little lies and projections are not going to work, Trujillo. I already proved that African-American culture has been influenced by West Africans in the Sahel and comes from a different source from other cultures of the diaspora due to the banning of drums. The only people who don't "buy my nonsense" are you Latinos(mainly Dominicans) with an agenda to attack Aframs(and Haitians) at every turn. But I'm sorry but facts are on my side which is why no one has been able to refute my sources. No one is claiming Muslim heritage you corny baseball playing vermin but that the African culture that influenced African-American culture came from the Sahel West Africa which was populated by mostly Muslim practitioners. Of course your peanut sized brain doesn't grasp that.

Don't dare talk about denying "African heritage" Trujillo. Your people are the kings and queens of that.

‘Indio’ skin color reveals Dominicans’ latent racism: poll

https://dominicantoday.com/dr/local/...t-racism-poll/

^^The Tainos who were wiped out and hardly any Dominican descends from outside a few.

Don't even get me started on the anti-Haitionism...

Antihaitianismo: Systemic Xenophobia and Racism in the Dominican Republic
Antihaitianismo: Systemic Xenophobia and Racism in the Dominican Republic – COHA

buh... buh...!!! "We just tired of the migrations!"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tppKmogV8y8


Or how natural hair is basically ILLEGAL in DR.

Natural Hair Is Still Under Attack in the Dominican Republic

https://hiplatina.com/natural-hair-u...ican-republic/


Or... What about a DARK SKINNED Dominican complaining about being too "dark" to be a Dominican.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tqn0PnkPSr0

Or the fact you guys acknowledge your Spanish ancestry over your African one when you f*ckers are around 52-45% African.

You f*ckers are the real "vegans" of the African Diaspora. I dare you to show us ONE Pan-Africanist that Te DR has produced. Just ONE.... Just UNO.... That have tried to connect to Africa on a large scale. Meanwhile...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv4wb-3Bho0

How many of you Dominicans have done back to Africa compared to AAs since us AAs are so ashamed of being African you jackass. Hell.... I'll make it EASIER where are your Dominican Youtubers like Dynast/Searchuhuru who constantly goes back and forth to Africa and suggests AAs do the same. FOH. Its so easy ripping your people's worthless statements apart.

Now get my people's names out yallm mouths and focus on that culturally backwards cesspool you call the DR.
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Old 08-17-2019, 12:12 AM
 
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According to these lunatics only this is "real African heritage."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZOg4xIiulw

And NOT this(Fulani ppl)...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=IZ0PrHJ1W_c

The latter which influenced this which I already showed with cited sources.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=P...&v=HYjFyxb5DUE

The latter two which are basically stringed rounded gourd instruments and bent note riffs.

Or what about the similarities between melismatic sound?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=PWKQcGneVNU

vs


https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=Uy2tEP3I3DM

There's a reason Aframs have such powerful vocals compared to most in the diaspora. But nah... I'm just "fabricating."


A comparison between the Upper West African influenced Blues and the lower West/Central African drum based Cuban music


















I bet half these non-ADOS experiences with ADOS culture comes from urban areas like NYC. lol. There is no argument. American Descendants of Slaves culture is influenced by West African Sahel/Muslim culture and not coastal/forest West African culture. The former who focused more on string instruments, melismatic vocals, pentatonic scales over lack polyrythyms(drumming) like in coastal West Africa. I don't know how much more I have to spell it out.
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Old 08-17-2019, 02:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
Also the reason these Latino countries "held on" to their "African cultures" so long is because they haven't even been heavily industrialized or urbanized especially Cuba specifically Eastern Cuba.

These silly ass Latinis are trying to say AAs deny "our African heritage" when AAs were the pioneers of Pan-Afrianism who Garvey was inspired by. I DAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAREEEEEEEEEEEE EEEE these Latinos especially you sleek talking Dominicans to show us your version of Henry Sylvester-Williams.

Oh you guy's pissed off the wrong one. Again just your own version of Henry Sylvester-Williams. And not the many upon many Afram activists/pan-Africanists.
No. The English Baptist’s were Protestants and much more fanatical about wiping out any evidence of African religions. The Spanish and Portuguese colonies were Catholic, as the French colonies so Africans would claim to be honoring a saint while in reality they would be worshipping an African god. Images of Catholic saints were used to represent African gods.

You have a lot of hatred towards the true African religions. Islam is the religion of white invaders from the Arabian peninsula and has nothing t to do with Africa originally.
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Old 08-17-2019, 02:52 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post
Point taken, i would even say that the whole black Muslim thing is mostly a northern urban thing, i doubt there are many claiming that in the deep south.

But the point I am trying to make is that, why there is this need to fabricate those claims. We all know why AAs Do not want anything to do with the real African heritage, we all know how protestant Christianity treats that culture, we all know that it will be very difficult to re-conciliate both religions.

African culture survived in the Catholic world because the Church was more willing to compromise in order to convert. The church has been doing it for 2k years. Protestants are way more intolerant to paganism.
We all know how Protestantism is advancing in latam, and together with a general lack of time and interest is putting a lots of pressure. not only of African traditions but in all traditions.

African heritage is disappearing in latam, but not because of shame or denial, but because of modernity.
In the Deep South they see mostly very Protestant. Have nothing to do with Islam.

I had DNA testing done. The African side of me was mostly from Nigeria, Angola, and Kenya. I’m 3/4s African and the rest is Iberian, Jewish, and a trace amount of Asian.

I also looked up my family records from the South.

The lack of knowledge of how people actually lived in the South abd where their ancestors cane from
made fertile ground for cultists and demagogues to make up and lies in cities like NYC. Obviously not everyone in Northern urban areas is Black is interested in Islam, most are not. But the vast majority of AAs interested in such things are indeed in Northern urban areas. This has to do with segregation in Northern cities. In the South due to court mandated desegregation orders there’s leas segregation. Northern areas, after Black People moved in, basically isolated them in large numbers in ghettoes. The fair housing laws were not enforced until the 90s.

But the Islamic cultish stuff isn’t just because people don’t want to know about the real African origins. It’s also because they feel shame about their families being from the South, which is associated with poverty, slavery, etc. I on the other hand am proud of my Southern heritage, their excellent record keeping got me Spanish/European citizenship.
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Old 08-17-2019, 03:04 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
No. The English Baptist’s were Protestants and much more fanatical about wiping out any evidence of African religions. The Spanish and Portuguese colonies were Catholic, as the French colonies so Africans would claim to be honoring a saint while in reality they would be worshipping an African god. Images of Catholic saints were used to represent African gods.

You have a lot of hatred towards the true African religions. Islam is the religion of white invaders from the Arabian peninsula and has nothing t to do with Africa originally.





Do you have a low IQ or something? It seems everyone in this thread does or lacks basic reading comprehension. You basically dismissed everything I said while projecting random **** into this argument. The more this thread goes on the more I'm really starting to doubt that you're even African-American. So now I hate indignous African religions??????????



Jackass, I'm part Haitian my culture is has all types of Vodou elements in it even in places that you won't even think to check. Heck I have many friends who practice Vodou(and Hoodoo) so lets not even go there with that nonsense.


ONCE AGAIN FOR THE GLUE SNIFFING SPECIAL ED KIDS IN THIS THREAD. I AM NOT SAYING AFRICAN-AMERICANS ARE MUSLIMS. But the West African cultures they were influenced by came from the Sahel which normally had African-American practitioners. I'm not saying Islam ITSELF influenced African-American culture but that it came from cultural traits from those African ethnic groups such as the Mandinka, Fulani, etc


This post doesn't even address anything. But is filled with silly projections. I can't believe a self-hating Afram like yourself is tag teaming with Dominicans to **** on Aframs. Again I'm starting to doubt you're Afram or part Afram. No Afram I met is this stupid. No **** Islam has nothing to do with Protestantism or Catholicism you retard. Any none Christian religions in the USA during slavery was stamped out but as I shown many Upper West African cultural elements still survive in ADOS culture today like I have shown especially with the Blues.

You can't be this retarded? Can you?
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Old 08-17-2019, 03:14 AM
 
117 posts, read 10,851 times
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For any layman interested about learning about the Upper/Sahelian West African influence on early African-American culture just read through the posted materials by scholars that I littered throughout these last two pages. Do not listen to self-hating clowns like NYwriterdude or these Dominican posters. The two groups have an agenda against Aframs especially the latter group. Like I said and confirmed with sources African-Americans and the rest of the Diaspora have a different source when it comes to the Africans who influenced our culture. I use Blues as this example for this African influence because its easier to explain but also Blues is the root of all Afram genres.

Quote:
That's how Songhoy Blues was born. "Songhoy" because Garba Touré, lead vocalist Aliou Touré and second guitarist Oumar Touré, although unrelated to each other – Touré is as common as Smith or Jones in northern Mali – all belong to the Songhoy people, one of the main ethnicities in the north. And "Blues" not only because northern Mali is the cradle of the blues and its music is often referred to as "the desert blues", but also because Garba and his mates are obsessed by that distant American cousin of their own blues. "My father used to make me listen to Jimi Hendrix. He's one of my idols. But I also listen BB King and John Lee Hooker a lot."
http://mg.co.za/article/2013-12-13-0...y-desert-blues

Not only that but I have shown the Mandinka influence on AA southern accent among other examples of influence. People like NYwriterdude and these Dominicans are now trying to define what makes a person "African" to fit their agenda to deAfricanize African-American culture. I already shown with sources that this wasn't the case. I also shown Upper/Sahel West African instruments that are still played by AAs in Blues that have survived but that post went untouched.

Due to not having anyway to counter what I posted they're now lying and saying "I'm trying to run away from African heritage." They keep bringing up irrelevant crap like African-American muslims in urban areas when that is not something I am even addressing and the West African muslim influence dates earlier I'm not even muslim nor do I have any interests in the religion at all. But according to these guys these types of West Africans are not REAL West Africans due to being muslims.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MR1svTwGws8

Now you see what I am getting at? When I speak of laymen I mean you non-self hating African-Americans only. Let me post this again.

Quote:
Afro-Cuban and African American music is very similar yet very different. Why? Because “essential elements of these two musics came from different parts of Africa, entering the New World by different routes, at different times, into differently structured societies” (Sublette, 159). These essential elements in African American music do not appear in Cuban music: swing and the blues scale. Cuban music contains elements of the clave (a rhythmic key) and “those undulating, repeating, melodic-rhythmic loops of fixed pitches called guajeo, montuno, or tumbao” (159). The reason for these differences was that they reflected two different musical styles that of Sudanic Africa and forest Africa.
http://soyguajira.blogspot.com/2012/...fro-cuban.html


^^The quote is essentially saying that Afram and Cuban music are BOTH African influenced but that they come from a DIFFERENT repeat DIFFERENT African source. Afram from the Sahel/Sudanic region of Africa where there was a lot of Muslim practitioners(doesn't mean all the ppl there were Muslims) and Cubans from the coastal forest region where it was mostly indignous African religions. Both those regions were African and have people who practiced African traditions.

So all this stuff about Black Muslims in urban areas is just silly. Not only that but no one in this thread as of yet has refuted the many sources I littered instead ran from them or projected. I refuse to allow people to make up LIES about my people's culture. Especially these self-hating Pan-Africanist clowns like NyWriterdude who has no interests in Afram culture because they believe its worthless due to thinking there is no African influence.


Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
In the Deep South they see mostly very Protestant. Have nothing to do with Islam.

I had DNA testing done. The African side of me was mostly from Nigeria, Angola, and Kenya. I’m 3/4s African and the rest is Iberian, Jewish, and a trace amount of Asian.

I also looked up my family records from the South.

The lack of knowledge of how people actually lived in the South abd where their ancestors cane from
made fertile ground for cultists and demagogues to make up and lies in cities like NYC. Obviously not everyone in Northern urban areas is Black is interested in Islam, most are not. But the vast majority of AAs interested in such things are indeed in Northern urban areas.
This has to do with segregation in Northern cities. In the South due to court mandated desegregation orders there’s leas segregation. Northern areas, after Black People moved in, basically isolated them in large numbers in ghettoes. The fair housing laws were not enforced until the 90s.

But the Islamic cultish stuff isn’t just because people don’t want to know about the real African origins. It’s also because they feel shame about their families being from the South, which is associated with poverty, slavery, etc. I on the other hand am proud of my Southern heritage, their excellent record keeping got me Spanish/European citizenship.

Those Dominicans in that Haitian thread were right about you. You really are the dumbest poster on here....

Last edited by ADOSwarrior; 08-17-2019 at 03:29 AM..
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