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Old 08-17-2019, 04:49 PM
 
151 posts, read 29,317 times
Reputation: 86

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
Also another ironic thing is that not only do AAs have African words in our southern accents(AAVE) as I have shown but we have more Creolized languages than these Afro-Latinos who supposedly "preserved" all their African heritage. Only Afro-Latinos I can think of are Afro Cubans/Brazilians. Outside them can't think of much. Sure some of these Creolized African-American languages may not be spoken as much today or are only in certain areas but facts remains American Descendants of Slaves managed to preserve them. I'm going to need one of the"African-Americans are the vegans of the Diaspora when it comes to African culture" people to please explain, why is it that there are virtually no surviving Creole/Patios languages in Spanish/Portuguese derived areas of Latin American but yet there are THREE, count 'em THREE surviving creole languages in the contiguous spoken by African-Americans to this day.

Louisiana Creole
Gullah/Geechie
Afro-Seminole


What happened? I thought Afro-Latinos destroyed ADOS in this regard? Again, I can only think of Afro-Cubans and maybe Brazilians.

Habla Congo or Habla Bantu is a Kongo-based liturgical language of the Palo religion with origins in Cuba and the Dominican Republic, later spreading to other countries in the Caribbean Basin. Another one you subnormal.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habla_Congo
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Old 08-17-2019, 06:18 PM
 
124 posts, read 13,700 times
Reputation: 54
It seems you can't take a hint that this ain't a fight for you and so once again I'm going to have to slap your ass around somemore.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post
Dude african americans are the least african of the diaspora. no way of denying that.
80% of the so called african heritage in the US is a fabrication. made up to fill the void left by centuries of protestantism. A puerto rican WHITE woman that practices santeria, dances plena y bomba, pray to Ogun, y Candelo, is 10000 times more african that you will ever be. Even if you have more melanine than her.
And yet not a single evidence was dropped disproving what I posted. Next?

And speaking of Ogun he'd probably slaughter your whole family before killing you for your treasons against fellow Africans like Haitians. Bawon Samedi(the REAL one not that fakeass one in the media) would probably kill that Puerto Rican white woman and rather help an ADOS over you or her Trujillo. So stop talking about African spirituality when you clowns try to white wash it. Look at what you guy's did to Yemaya.



Also I dare you to utter this crap to a Hoodoo practitioner in the deep south and watch what will happen to your ass. Look up ancestral worship. I'm closer to the Loas and my ancestors than you lame non-Black Latinos will ever be. So next?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post
just drop it.
No get off our nuts you ****.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post
the black guys that claim to be olmecs have a more interesting fabrication that you. yours is sad and self hating.
LMAO! This is sad and pathetic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post

the vast mayority of the fula people From Senegal and Gambia where sent to Brazil not the US as your twisted teory suggest.
I never knew the Fulani represented the only Sahelian ethnic groups taken into slavery?

Quote:
“I did a talk a few years ago at Harvard where I played those two things, and the room absolutely exploded in clapping, because [the connection] was obvious,” says Diouf, an author and scholar who is also a researcher at New York’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. “People were saying, ‘Wow. That’s really audible. It’s really there.’” It’s really there thanks to all the Muslim slaves from West Africa who were taken by force to the United States for three centuries, from the 1600’s to the mid-1800’s. Upward of 30 percent of the African slaves in the United States were Muslim, and an untold number of them spoke and wrote Arabic, historians say now. Despite being pressured by slave owners to adopt Christianity and give up their old ways, many of these slaves continued to practice their religion and customs, or otherwise melded traditions from Africa into their new environment in the antebellum South.Forced to do menial, backbreaking work on plantations, for example, they still managed, throughout their days, to voice a belief in God and the revelation of the Qur’an. These slaves’ practices eventually evolved—decades and decades later, parallel with different singing traditions from Africa—into the shouts and hollers that begat blues music, Diouf and other historians believe.
http://archive.aramcoworld.com/issue....u.s.blues.htm

I can care less for your tired strawman and projections when facts are on my side.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post

Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C., has assembled the largest collection of DNA records from West and Central Africa in the world, some 3,800 samples in all. The collection concentrates on ethnic groups in areas where most slaves in the United States came from.

Most blacks brought to the U.S. came from what are now Nigeria, Benin, Togo, Ghana, and Sierra Leone, all of which are in West Africa. Smaller numbers came from Senegal, the Gambia, the Congo River basin, and Angola.

https://www.infoplease.com/history/b...-african-roots
First of all I can tell you know little about genetics. Firstly, I never said African-Americans were majority Fulani or even Senegambian. If anything I read we are mostly Cameroonian/Sierra Leanean however we were mostly influenced culturally by Sahelian West Africans because culture from Coastal West Africa wasn't allowed. This is similar to Afro-Brazilians being mostly Angolan but their culture being mostly Yoruba. Second those listed areas especially Nigeria(which HAS a significant Fulani population BTW...), Ghana and Sierra Leone have large areas apart of the Sahel and a Muslim population in the North who were taken into slavery. Your source nor any other DNA company as of yet tells which specific ethnic group was captured by goes mostly by country/region. So your link doesn't tell us anything. Lastly, if we are speaking genetics it depends on the region in the USA.



Anyways.....


Famous white Natchez Mississippi planter/slaver, William Dunbar, express that Mississippi planters held a preference for Africans from the interior, stating "there are certain nations from the interior of Africa the individuals of which I have always found more civilized, at least better disposed than those from the coast, such as Bornon, Houssa, Zanfara, Zegzeg, Kapina, and Tombootoo regions". "The bornon" are those from the bornu empire, the "Houssa" are the Hausa, "Kapina" refers to those from the Katsina region of present day northern /Vigeria and Southern Niger. "Zanfara" refers to the Zamfara region, another region in present day Northern /Vigeria and southern Niger. Tombootoo refers to the Bambara of Mail. All of these regions had heavy islamic influenced populations.


Quote:
Of the approximately 388,000 Africans who landed in America, almost 92,000 (24 percent) were Senegambians. In the early decades of immigration to the Chesapeake region before 1700, there were more immigrants from Senegambia (almost 6,000) than from the Bight of Biafra (about 5,000), and they totaled about 31,000 by the end of the migration, representing almost a third of all arrivals from Senegambia. About 45,000 Senegambians were settled in the coastal Low Country of the Carolinas and Georgia, where they constituted 21 percent of African immigrants. Senegambians were also prominent among African immigrants in the northern colonies, accounting for about 28 percent of arrivals, or over 7,000 people. Almost 9,000 Senegambians — often identified as Bambara or Mandingo — went to the Gulf region, especially to Louisiana, where they constituted about 40 percent of the population arriving from Africa.
Hence, people from Senegambia were prominent everywhere in the United States, much more so than virtually anywhere else in the Western Hemisphere,
although there were also considerable numbers of Senegambians in the French Caribbean islands and in French Guiana. Senegambia was strongly influenced by Islam, more so than any other region of origin, which means that many enslaved Africans in the United States had been exposed to Islam, more so proportionately than in the rest of the Americas.
There were many Muslims in Brazil in the nineteenth century, mostly in Bahia, but they came from the central Sudan (northern Nigeria and adjacent areas), unlike those who were sent to the United States. Muslims were clearly present in both the low country of Carolina and Georgia and in the Tidewater region of Virginia and Maryland. Adult Muslim males stand out prominently, while there are very few references to Muslim women. This reflects what is known about the slave trade originating in the interior of West Africa, which was composed almost entirely of males."
--Senegambia, the Gold Coast, and the Bight of Benin

Quote:
"Thereafter, planters in South Carolina, Georgia and Louisiana preferred enslaved Africans from Senegambia because of their experience in rice cultivation. This would explain in part why Americans imported a relatively large proportion of Senegambians. In French Louisiana, a captain was instructed “to try to purchase several blacks who know how to cultivate rice."
MANA - Muslim Alliance in North America

You ignoring the Mande/Mandinka influence in SC/GA is very telling. But anyways more.... This time genetics.



Quote:
In this study, we examine Y-chromosome genetic variation in African descendant populations. In addition, we search for genetic evidence of substantial Senegambian “Grain Coast” ancestry in African American males from South Carolina. Finally, we consider the paternal African origins of several African descendant populations throughout the Americas. In doing this we hope to not only provide a genetic perspective to compliment historical investigations into the issue of African geographical origins but also contribute to the understanding of the genetic structure of African American populations. Understanding the variation present in these populations has implicit ramifications on admixture mapping and association studies in this admixed politically defined ‘macro-ethnic’ group.
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0029687

Quote:
The study of recent natural selection in human populations has important applications to human history and medicine. Positive natural selection drives the increase in beneficial alleles and plays a role in explaining diversity across human populations. By discovering traits subject to positive selection, we can better understand the population level response to environmental pressures including infectious disease. Our study examines unusual population differentiation between three large data sets to detect natural selection. The populations examined, African Americans, Nigerians, and Gambians, are genetically close to one another (F(ST) < 0.01 for all pairs), allowing us to detect selection even with moderate changes in allele frequency. We also develop a tree-based method to pinpoint the population in which selection occurred, incorporating information across populations. Our genome-wide significant results corroborate loci previously reported to be under selection in Africans including HBB and CD36. At the HLA locus on chromosome 6, results suggest the existence of multiple, independent targets of population-specific selective pressure. In addition, we report a genome-wide significant (p = 1.36 × 10(-11)) signal of selection in the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21907010

But like I said genetics doesn't give us a specific ethnic group yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post


The bulk of the fula people were sent to DR, brazil and cuba you subnormal. and the fulani left little to no influence in those regions.
trere is town and a famous river Fula un DR named after the fula people that settled there.

rent a house there and learn some history.

https://www.airbnb.com/things-to-do/places/2480270
Okay and? Those regions may have received higher percentage of Fulani slaves but African-Americans in terms of raw numbers received more Senegambian and West African Sahel slaves. Next?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post

you see Dominicans dont have to fabricate their history it is right there!!!
So yes the Taino wannabe!!!

Quote:
Trujillo painted Dominicans as proud but modest campesinos – the hybrid of Spanish conquistadores and native Tainos – and Haitians as superstitious, backward, physically grotesque Africans. Public education in the Dominican Republic for decades under Trujillo was nationalistic and hateful toward Haiti and its people.
https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...racist-history

What about the HAITIANS who are more culturally African than you POS?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post

we dont only have words or accents we still speak the yoruba language you retard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucum%C3%AD_language
Wow... Only one creole based language. And how common is it in DR? Chances are it was exported there from Cuba just like your weak ass(DeAfricanizing version of Vodou) "21 Divisions" was exported to DR from Haiti.

Edit:
Man I should've took more of my time. I mean I was in a hurry. Like my friend(an AA Creole from Eastern Texas who is watching this debate and you better pray he doesn't join up) said everything was in front of my eyes. Read you own link because this is what it says. Heck the very first sentence.
Quote:
Lucumí is a lexicon of words and short phrases derived from Yoruba language in Cuba and the Dominican Republic; it is used as the liturgical language of Santería in Cuba and the Dominican Republic.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucumí_language

This is not a real language retard. Look up what lexicon means or liturgical languages then come back to me with real credible creole languages that Afro-Latinos use(if there's any). Next?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post

Traditionally, the Fulani (or Fulbe, Fula people, Peul or Hausa-Fulani) were nomadic herders across West Africa from the Senegal River Valley. Their adventure begins in the Tagant section of Mauritania, more or less in the Sahara desert-Sahel border, according to the historians Linda Heywood and John Thornton. Originating there explains why so many Fulbe are lighter-skinned, with straighter hair than most Africans in the same region. In the areas further south, they stand out, often having been described as "mulattoes" by visitors from Europe, say the historians. These features also led Colonial-era researchers to think of them as a mixed-race group, giving the Fulbe "a high place" in Europeans' estimation.

Fulbe communities were divided into two groups: an elite who were strongly Muslim, many of whom were scholars of the Torodbe group; and the non-Muslim commoners, who specialized in raising cattle and fighting.
Trujillo doesn't realize that West Africans themselves are diverse. And I dare you to tell these Fulanis they are not "African."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1VFi3p55BM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n84vv7BHOAA


And watch what would happen to you. You're starting to sound like those African-Americans who "police who Blacks are." lol. More importantly where did you even get your source? Fulanis were known as "white" by the more darker West Africans because they didn't have stereotypical African features.

But... I'm tired of your ass so left me just finish you off some more.

Quote:
Just as African Muslims brought their religion, technology and folk tales, they also brought their music. Jobson in the 17th century and Park in the 18th century remarked on the widespread presence of music in their travels among the Wolof, Mandingo and Fula. African instruments described by Jobson and Park included one-string fiddles, various types of lutes, flutes, harps, a xylophone (the bala), bowstrings (the string is blown on and struck with a stick—this is the American diddly bow), various drums and the clapping of hands, which appeared to constitute a necessary part of the chorus.[39] Virtually every village had a jilli (griot) who sang extempore songs in praise of chiefs and the ancestors as well as songs concerning important historical events. Other musicians were described as a class of devout Muslims who traveled throughout the land singing religious songs and performing religious ceremonies.[40] Some of these traveling musicians were actually Muslim traders who simply brought their music with them wherever they traveled.[41]

Senegambian/sahelian music like their counterpart in the Muslim world was a mixture of an old African tradition and a newly inherited Islamic-Arabic musical tradition, producing a new cultural manifestation that possessed elements of both. Influence went both ways because the Moors adopted many African elements as witnessed in the uniqueness of North African music, Southern Spanish music and traditional Portuguese music like the fado.

In trying to identify African influence in African American music, especially the blues, many scholars have come to agree with Paul Oliver’s early contention that “the blues was a product of acculturation, of the meeting of African (notably Senegambian) musical traditions with Euro-American (notably British) ones.”[42] (Oliver 125, see also Kubah, Coolen) By Senegambia, Oliver and others refer to the shared musical tradition of the Sahel crescent zone that stretches from Senegal/Gambia across Mali to Northern Nigerian and Hausa land.[43] The main elements of their argument that the main African influence on the blues stems from the Senegambia are as follows:

1. The ensemble of musical instrument in the Senegambia and the Sahel crescent, which consists of the long-neck lute, one-string fiddles and bones/rattles/tapping on a calabash, is remarkably similar to the fiddle, banjo and tambourines which dominated African American music from the 17th to 19th century. Various plucked lutes were prominent instruments among the Wolof, Mandingo, Fula, Soninke and Hausa. These instruments whether the five-strong halam of the Wolof, the three-string koonting of the Mandingo or the Hausa komo were most likely the grandfather of the banjo.[44] An early colonial slave song says that “Negro Sambo play fine banger, make his fingers go like handsaw.” (???) This Fula, Mandingo or Wolof Sambo was obviously an early master of the banjo.[45] (Kubah and Oliver, 57) A runaway slave notice mentions a Sambo who is an expert with the fiddle. (?) African fiddles whether the riti of the Wolof, the gogi or the Hausa or the gogeru of the Fula were common instruments in the Sahel crescent. The European fiddle was the most common instrument in the antebellum era and an African American who was familiar with the African fiddle would have been highly motivated in the acquisition of prestige and time-off to pick up the new European fiddle and master it.

The typical early black musical group of the Caribbean and South America included drums and gongs, scraps and voices which would correspond to an ensemble of the West African rain forest. “The early blues bands by contrast consisted very often of fiddle, guitars and sometimes homemade percussion, which would easily accommodate techniques learned in the savannah groups with their bowed goge, lutes and rattles.[46]

2. The blues tradition and much of other black musical forms which revolves around a solo performer accompanied by a plucked-string instrument does not have a parallel in the cultures of the West African rain forest and the Congo, but it does in the Sahel crescent. Griots and other traveling musicians of the Sahel performed like the blues men “in the midst of an active and noisy crowd that constantly comments on and dances to their music.”[47] “Musicologists generally agree that Africa’s black bluesmen have, in essence, reinstituted the high art of the African griot.” (?)

3. African American field hollers (a few melancholy, lonesome lines sung individually by a worker) and work songs are widely considered to be one of the predecessors of the blues. Hollers and work songs are rare among the people of the rain forest but plentiful in the Sahel crescent. A researcher found a match for a Mississippi prison holler performed by a man nick named Tangle Eye with a recording from Senegal. “When we intercut these two pieces on a tape, it sounded as if Tangle Eye and the Senegalese were answering each other, phase by phase. As one listens to this musical union, spawning thousands of miles and hundreds of years, the conviction grows that Tangle Eye’s forebears [sic] must have come from Senegal bringing this song style with them.”[48]

Scholars have found unique similarities between American work songs and work songs among the Hausa and cattle herding Fula,[49] so much so that some feel the field holler originated with African cattle herders.[url='http://mana-net.org/#_edn50'][50]



Senegambian peoples, many of whom were Muslims, were some of the first enslaved Africans brought to America. Many of these Senegambians were familiar with rice cultivation and as European settlers experimented with rice in the 17th century, these Senegambians passed on their knowledge, thus shaping the development of rice cultivation in America. Thereafter, planters in South Carolina, Georgia and Louisiana preferred enslaved Africans from Senegambia because of their experience in rice cultivation. This would explain in part why Americans imported a relatively large proportion of Senegambians. In French Louisiana, a captain was instructed "to try to purchase several blacks who know how to cultivate rice."


Distinct characteristics of Afromerican Blues music that are found in Senegambian/Sahel music that aren't found in Carribean/West Indian or Afro-Latino music.

"The absence of polyrhythm and asymmetric time-lines and the presence of emphasis instead of off-beats in blues and early jazz are also characteristic of Sahel music. On the other hand, the music of the rain forest and the Congo with its heavy emphasis on drumming is characterized by polyrhythms and asymmetric time-lines and its influence is reflected in the black music of the Caribbean and South America.[52] Arguments that the drum was prohibited in the U.S. and that enslaved Africans lived in closer proximity to whites are not persuasive because drums are not the only means to express polyrhythms and the cultural impulse for polyrhythm would not have been totally stifled by the influence of white culture. A more plausible answer is the influence of Sahel culture in the development of African American music"

Like the blues, Sahel music typically uses pentatonic scales that allows inflections and shadings of notes (the blues notes) as well as the use of a central tone reference, often a drone stroke which renders it "out of turn" around which the melody revolves.[54] The blues tonality is not found in rain forest and Congo music or in Latin American music"

"In 1968 he [the Mali musician Ali Farka Toure] heard a recording of John Lee Hooker and was entranced. Initially he thought Hooker was playing music derived from Mali. Several Malian song forms—including musical traditions of the Bambara, Songhay and Fulani ethnic groups—rely on minor pentatonics (five note) scales which are similar to the blues scales"

"The blues and jazz style of bending notes, melisma (ornamental phrasing of several notes in one syllable which is typical of the Muslim call to prayer), slurs, and raspy voices are all characteristics of music in the Sahel zone. These aspects of Sahel music are undoubtedly a direct influence of Arab/Islamic music. Billy Holiday was master of this style"

As sung by her [Billy Holiday] a note may (in the words of Glen Coutler) begin 'slightly under pitch, absolutely without vibrato, and gradually be forced up to dead center from where the vibrato shakes free, or it may trail off mournfully; or at final cadences, the note is a whole step above the written one and must be pressed slowly down to where it belongs.' Coincidence or not, all these features are found in Islamic African music and hardly at all in other styles
MANA - Muslim Alliance in North America

This is like the TENTH time you been slapped around Trujillo just wave the white flag!!!



Or RING THE BELL!!! But nope going to toy with you some more. Speaking of Fulani cattle culture... Did you know it influenced African-American cowboy culture?



AFRICAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO AMERICAN “COWBOY” CULTURE

Quote:
The first major contribution by Africans to North American society was in the arena of cattle raising. When the Fulani (or Fula) people from Senegambia, along with longhorn cattle, were imported to South Carolina in 1731, colonial herds increased from 500 to 6,784 some 30 years later. These Fulas were expert cattlemen and were responsible for introducing African husbandry patterns of open grazing now practiced throughout the American cattle industry. Cattle drives to the centers of distribution were innovations Africans brought with them as contributions to a developing industry. Originally a cowboywas an African who worked with cattle, just as a houseboy worked in “de big House.” Open grazing made practical use of an abundance of land and a limited labor force.

Africans and their descendants were America’s first cowboys. Most people are not aware that many cowboys of the American West were Black, contrary to how the film industry and the media have portrayed them. Only recently have we begun to recognize the extent to which cowboy culture has African roots. Many details of cowboy life, work, and even material culture can be traced to the Fulani, America’s first cowboys, but there has been little investigation of this by historians of the American West.

Contemporary descriptions of local West African animal husbandry bear a striking resemblance to what appeared in Carolina and later in the American dairy and cattle industries. Africans introduced the first artificial insemination and the use of cows’ milk for human consumption. Peter Wood believes that from this early relationship between cattle and Africans the word, “cowboy” originated.

As late as 1865, following the Civil War, Africans whose responsibilities were with cattle were referred to as “cowboys’ in plantation records. After 1865, whites associated with the cattle industry referred to themselves as “cattlemen,” to distinguish themselves from the Black cowboys. The annual North-South migratory patterns the cowboys followed are directly related to the migratory patterns of the Fulani cattle herders who lived scattered throughout Nigeria and Niger. Not only were Africans imported with the expertise to handle cattle, but the African longhorn was imported as well, a breed that later became known as the Texas longhorn.

Much of the early language associated with cowboy culture had a strong African flavor. The word buckra (buckaroo) is derived from Mbakara, the Efik/lbibio work for “poor white man.” It was used to describe a class of whites who worked as broncobusters, bucking and breaking horses. Planters used buckras as broncobusters because slaves were too valuable to risk injury. Another African word that found its way into popular cowboy songs is “get along little dogies.” The word “doggies” originated from Kimbundu, along with kidogo, a little something, and dodo, small. After the Civil War when great cattle roundups began, Black cowboys introduced such Africanisms to cowboy language and songs.
- SlaveRebellion.org


LIKE I SAID THIS TOPIC AINT FOR YOU!!!!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post

does that sounds like african americans to you?stop making sit up. Most of the afrocan americans are Ebe, Yoruba, Fon.
stop trying to cling to a Muslim root that is not there.
Citing mainstream scholars on this subject instead of listening to some random Dominican online is not "making 'sit' up", Trujillo. I don't know how you guy's "debate" in the DR but here in America with cite valid scholars. Man, I want to see the look on a Muslim West African face when you tell them they are not "real Africans" due to their faith. Especially those West African Guineans who are known for being hot-heads. lol. Furthmore no one is trying to prove a connection to Islam retard but Africans who came from those areas(i.e the Sahel. Do you even know what the Sahel is?) and the cultures they belonged to and the instruments they played. You screaming "you not MUSLIM!!!" over and over again isn't going to save your argument.

Lastly, I double dare you to say you have more credibility than PH.d ethnomusicologist Gerhard Kubik who has shown the connections between Blues and the West African Sahel. Class dismissed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post
Habla Congo or Habla Bantu is a Kongo-based liturgical language of the Palo religion with origins in Cuba and the Dominican Republic, later spreading to other countries in the Caribbean Basin. Another one you subnormal.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habla_Congo
NOPE! No good. Trujillo. Someone informed just now on how linguistics work. And this and the Yoruba language you posted AIN'T gonna cut it. They are liturgical languages, not working everyday languages that people speak like Gullah/Geechee, Louisiana Creole or Afro-Seminole. You almost got me I'll admit.

But if we use your examples of Habla Bantu or Yoruba like its used in diaspora religions then Aframs have MANY repeat MANY examples of those!!! AAs have that as well with the Mende singers and fulani countersparts.
https://glc.yale.edu/sites/default/f...lah%20Song.pdf


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2c6ot_YAujU

Gullahs can't actually speak Mende but they can chant songs and poems in mende, vai, and fulani. lol. Another example:

Quote:
" He identified Mende and Vai phrases embedded in Gullah songs; Mende passages in Gullah stories; and an entire Mende song, apparently a funeral dirge. Dr. Turner also found some Gullah people who could count from one of nineteen in the Guinea/Sierra Leone dialect of Fula. Although his Gullah informants knew that these expressions were in African languages, and in some cases knew the proper translation, they did not know which specific African languages they were reciting."
https://glc.yale.edu/sites/default/f...20Language.pdf

What you shown is not special. So I guess Afro-Latinos who SUPPOSEDLY preserved most of their African cultures do NOT have creole languages like ADOS people. Not even one. Not even uno. ZIP!

Louisiana Creole, Gullah/Geechee and Afro-Seminole on the other hand can be spoken everyday and not just in religious chants. lol Man just give up Trujillo.

Last edited by ADOSwarrior; 08-17-2019 at 06:45 PM..
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Old 08-18-2019, 11:23 PM
 
24,415 posts, read 17,855,746 times
Reputation: 9245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post
You have your jewish ascendancy clear and was examined by the Spanish authorities and found to be real. good job for that! it is not easy to do it after so many generations. Your story is not a fabrication, it is real and was proven.

the issue i am having is why there is this need among AAs to do not accept the fact that they come straight from pagan africans, and insist into clinging into whatever faint idea of something else, what ever else, but not that?

Latin americans are not even majority black but have preserved way more african culture, and they do not go around trying to claim some other link (even when the link is there!!!!!!). all comes to the damage done by Protestantism and the inferiority complex created from the fact that in the eyes of the white man, west africans didn't develop a "great civilization" as the olmec, jews, Egyptians, moors or any other culture AAS try to hook themselves into. Pretty sad indeed.
You’re absolutely right on the devaluation of West Africans by Protestants. Further devaluation happened to AAs moving to Northern cities from the South. So all that became internalized and expressed as self hatred. ADOS is getting hysterical at the very mention of West African ancestry. Haitians themselves practice Voodoo and there’s no Islamic culture there so that he invents Islamic Heritage among AAs is just plain bizzare.
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Old 08-19-2019, 12:19 AM
 
124 posts, read 13,700 times
Reputation: 54
You guy's been debunked now. Move on now. Sho... Sho...
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Old 08-19-2019, 03:12 AM
 
24,415 posts, read 17,855,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
You guy's been debunked now. Move on now. Sho... Sho...
No one’s debunked.

You’re basically hijacking threads and screaming the loudest to get your way. No matter how loudly lies are screamed, they remain lies. You should be ashamed of yourself for making up this crap.

Please name famous Black Southern writers or people actually from or familiar with that culture who make claims of Islamic culture.

Richard Wright, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Zora Neal’s Hurston, Langston Hughes, etc. No one made these claims because they don’t exist.

Name Islamic places of workshop in the Deep South that were recently founded. Come up with published statements from Southerners on this.
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Old 08-19-2019, 03:15 AM
 
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To be fair, ADOS is reacting to lies and racist statements made by certain Dominicans. But one set of lies and racist statements don’t justify another set of lies ave racist statements.

Not all Dominicans feel the same way and some do identify as Black. It depends on the individual.
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Old 08-19-2019, 04:07 AM
 
124 posts, read 13,700 times
Reputation: 54
@NyWriterdude


You guy's tried to make false projections on my argument by claiming I was trying to prove AA culture is Islamic. Next you guy's were trying to portray me as some self-hating hotep who wants to be Muslim due to living in urban areas like the N.O.I lol.


No what I have said and proven is the fact that African-American culture is influence by Africans who were Muslims. Not Islam directly but African ethnic groups who were largely Muslim like the Mandingo, Hausa, Fulani and others. The three are just as West African as the Ashantis, Yorubas and Fon(who influenced Haitian Vodou). Most people in those three ethnics just pratice Islam. if I was trying to prove Islam directly influenced AA culture I would have said Afram AAVE have Arabic words or that Islamic religion practices are seen in AA culture. No I was only highlighting the non-Islamic cultural traits of those ethnic groups like they preference of string instruments over drumming those same string instruments which made there way to the USA and help create the Blues.

So yes, I already proven that AA culture has Sahelian influence whether you like it or not. Sahel=/=Islam. I don't care about your personal vendetta against Islam but facts are facts. Posting facts is not "screaming the loudest" you and your Dominican buddy just never had an argument to stand on. So you can keep closing your ears saying "its not TRUE!" to help yourself feel better.

Now sho... sho...
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Old 08-19-2019, 06:02 AM
 
24,415 posts, read 17,855,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
@NyWriterdude


You guy's tried to make false projections on my argument by claiming I was trying to prove AA culture is Islamic. Next you guy's were trying to portray me as some self-hating hotep who wants to be Muslim due to living in urban areas like the N.O.I lol.


No what I have said and proven is the fact that African-American culture is influence by Africans who were Muslims. Not Islam directly but African ethnic groups who were largely Muslim like the Mandingo, Hausa, Fulani and others. The three are just as West African as the Ashantis, Yorubas and Fon(who influenced Haitian Vodou). Most people in those three ethnics just pratice Islam. if I was trying to prove Islam directly influenced AA culture I would have said Afram AAVE have Arabic words or that Islamic religion practices are seen in AA culture. No I was only highlighting the non-Islamic cultural traits of those ethnic groups like they preference of string instruments over drumming those same string instruments which made there way to the USA and help create the Blues.

So yes, I already proven that AA culture has Sahelian influence whether you like it or not. Sahel=/=Islam. I don't care about your personal vendetta against Islam but facts are facts. Posting facts is not "screaming the loudest" you and your Dominican buddy just never had an argument to stand on. So you can keep closing your ears saying "its not TRUE!" to help yourself feel better.

Now sho... sho...
Where are published books by Southern Blacks claiming that the Fulani were a primary cultural influence.

Are you denying that AAs have ancestry from coastal or Central African groups?

According to PBS, 10 to 15 percent of African slaves brought to the US were Muslim And enclave of AAs maintained parts of this faith in Georgia.

https://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetec...am-in-america/

That doesn’t mean the majority of AAs predominantly descend from Muslim groups, but obviously a statistically significant number do.

The University of North Carolina has done research on Muslim slaves in America, and jt was an estimated-0 percent according to them.

Islam in America: From African Slaves to Malcolm X, The Twentieth Century, Divining America: Religion in American History, TeacherServe, National Humanities Center

https://www.jstor.org/stable/2211064
That’s from the Southern History Society

Now that that mainstream white sources are always to be consulted, but it should be noted that acknowledged between 10 to 15 percent of African slaves in the US are Muslim.

I think you over exaggerated the Islamic influence. Just as some AAs like me have Jewish ancestry ties to slavery, some AAs have Muslim ancestry. I don’t think either group is the majority of AAs.
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Old 08-19-2019, 06:19 AM
 
124 posts, read 13,700 times
Reputation: 54
You see this is why its worthless debating with you. Throughout my post I said many times that West Africans from the Sahel have been able to influence the culture of AAs due to the banning of the drums of coastal West Africans. Not that the majority of AAs are of West African Sahelians. I've said many times for example that the majority of Afro-Brazilians are Angolan but Yoruba influenced their culture the most.

And your source are old as ****. The sources I posted are recent and most put the Muslim slaves at 30%.


Quote:
Social scientists estimate that 15 to 30 percent, or "as many as 600,000 to 1.2 million," slaves in antebellum America were Muslims. Forty-six percent of the slaves in the antebellum South were kidnapped from Africa's western regions, which boasted "significant numbers of Muslims."
https://www.theroot.com/african-slav...ame-1790876253

As for questions like this "Where are published books by Southern Blacks claiming that the Fulani were a primary cultural influence."

I'm no longer doing your homework for you. Go back to the many sources I posted that you ignored. Anyways, I'm finished with this "debate" if you wanna call it that.
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Old 08-19-2019, 08:15 AM
 
3,157 posts, read 6,871,030 times
Reputation: 1575
What I don't understand is where is the forum's moderator. The last many posts have absolutely nothing to do with pan-africanism and only speaks to the dysfunction and lack of focus we tend to have as a people.

The ADOS movement sadly segregates people and gives out so much wrong information and doesn't understand pan africanism.

I thought that this was interesting



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTXhRzWaJ3o
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