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Old 08-30-2019, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,230 posts, read 709,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
Not sure if we are reading the same image because the Bight of Benin is losing out in every region. And seems to be the lowest ancestry in most. Not sure what you mean with 2nd highest. The image actually helps my case more. As for the lower Mississippi the Bight of Benin ancestry seems to be the third largest while the Senegambian one is the 2nd which again helps my case.
Yes, thank you for conforming that my attachment works( occasional issues).
I stated it's a reoccurring region in some Aframs's AncestryDNA results ( Mine in particular which is 2nd highest). Look at this topic with the others posting their results: African Ancestry DNA


Quote:
Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
More importantly I see Yoruba/Hausa are included in as "Bight of Benin" which could explain why those ancestry studies on AAs you reference show high "Benin." Haitians are the only Diasporans who have very high Benin/Togo ancestry. Heck Aframs don't even resemble Beninese/Togolese like Haitians do. And I'm talking the less admixed Aframs. That "Benin" component probably contains Yoruba or even Hausa ancestry.
That's a strong possibility for the reoccurring results from that region and also the Ewe/Mina is the largest group represnted from that region.
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Old 08-30-2019, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,527 posts, read 7,375,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADOSwarrior View Post
Not sure if we are reading the same image because the Bight of Benin is losing out in every region. And seems to be the lowest ancestry in most. Not sure what you mean with 2nd highest. The image actually helps my case more. As for the lower Mississippi the Bight of Benin ancestry seems to be the third largest while the Senegambian one is the 2nd which again helps my case.

More importantly I see Yoruba/Hausa are included in as "Bight of Benin" which could explain why those ancestry studies on AAs you reference show high "Benin." Haitians are the only Diasporans who have very high Benin/Togo ancestry. Heck Aframs don't even resemble Beninese/Togolese like Haitians do. And I'm talking the less admixed Aframs. That "Benin" component probably contains Yoruba or even Hausa ancestry.
That could be it. Yoruba in particular is the second biggest ethnicity in Benin and I think most of them live south or east along the border near Southwest Nigeria, which also has a very large Yoruba population. AncestryDNA is probably allocating Yoruba as "Benin/Togo in the algorithms , and that may explain why Sharif622 and I have estimates of over one-third Benin/Togo, whereas Myheritage has allocated half of my African ancestry to "Nigerian", but still only a small fraction of Sierra Leonean (includes Guinea and Liberia and probably correlates to to my small percentages of Mali or Ghana at Ancestry).

Last edited by Chicagoland60426; 08-30-2019 at 11:39 PM..
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Old 08-31-2019, 07:49 AM
 
136 posts, read 18,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
It should also be noted today most Africans are Christians or Muslims and that includes Yorubas. Groups like like Hausas of Northern Nigeria and Niger have been entirely Islamicized. Yorubas are well aware of their ancestral religion, but many Yoruba are either Christian or Muslim. Arab imperialism and European colonialism have reshaped Africa.
Islam spread in West Africa via two phases. The very first wave was by Berber traders to the Ghana Empire around the 9-10th century. And the Hausas in Northern Nigeria/Niger were apart of that phase and were already "Islamicized" by then. Islam has been in Northern Nigeria for a long time. And Hausa culture is not even completely "Islamicized" like say the Northern Sudanese people. I'm beginning to believe you have a very simple concept of African culture. I.e any African culture that has Islam in it has been "Islamicized." This time I'm going to go in depth if this to put this to rest once in for all. Are you not aware that Islam in West Africa is quite different from Islam from MENA? Even Berber traveler Ibn Battuta noted it.

He noted it because West Africans sync their Islam with traditional African beliefs from Mali, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Northern Nigeria, Senegal, etc. Islam is just a religion it is not a culture. So you trying to dismiss the influence of Sahelian culture on AA culture due to AAs culture/religion not having any Islamic elements is not only a waste of time but tiring. More importantly the Bambara people who are a subgroup of the Mandinka who were apart of the nobles of the Mali Empire have been Muslim for a very long time(since the Mali empire) and have art like this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmYAcQcF3OQ

^Art like the above is not typical of Islamic art and at worse is seen as idolatry. In fact many West African Muslims have forms of idolatry which was why Timbuktu's culture was attacked by those Jihadist savages. Also women of Mali, Senegal, Northern Nigeria, etc have more rights and don't even need to wear a hijab. Which a again is atypical of Islam. Don't believe? Then how about we see what Ibn Battuta states:
Quote:
The Massufa were devout Muslims who said their prayers, learned the law, and memorized the Qu'ran. But their women were "not modest in the presence of men" and did not wear a veil. Although people married, "but the women do not travel with the husband, and if one of them wanted to do that, she would be prevented by her family." Each was free to take other sexual partners from outside the "prohibited degrees of marriage" [father, brother, son, etc.]. "One of them would enter his house to find his wife with her companion and would not disapprove of that conduct."
Quote:
At first Battuta wanted to leave immediately with a group of pilgrims from Walata, but then decided to remain and visit the Mali capital. Battuta ultimately spent about 50 days in Walata, and left this description of the town: "The town of Iwalatan is very hot and there are in it a few small date palms in whose shade they plant melons. They obtain water from the ground which exudes it. Mutton is obtainable in quantity there. The clothes of its people are of fine Egyptian material. Most of the inhabitants belong to the Massufa, and as for their women--they are extremely beautiful and are more important than the men."
Ibn Battuta in West Africa

And there are more examples. So tell me how is that "Islamicized"? Anyways, the second wave which helped Islam spread further in West Africa outside of known territories here Islam was the majority was done by West African jihadist themselves. I.e Fulani jihadist like the Sokoto caliphate. So no there was no mythical "Arab imperialism" in West Africa if that's what your thinking. As for the Yorubas many still practice their traditional especially the rural parts of Yorubaland. More importantly they are known to sync Islam/Christianity with their traditional beliefs. Traditional African religions is known for being easily able to sync with other beliefs. We see this in the new world.... All in all fact is you are not as informed on African history, culture or religion as you like to believe yourself to. You think Sahalien culture is stoning women to death for adultry. I know you going to call me a "Muslim wannabe" lol... But its clear you have a bias/agenda against Islam and as an extension project it on Africans who practice it. I don't care for Islam and would never convert to that religion(sorry I love to drink and love pork ribs) however if you were a true "Pan-Africanists" you'd know West African Muslims are just as "West African" culturally as any other West African. Your agenda reeks stronger when you even dismiss the obvious West African sahelian influence on AA culture as me or other AAs "wanting to be Muslims" or "having self-hate." Once again religion=/=culture. Islam would have not been able to survive as a spiritual belief among the slaves in the Protestant American south but the Sahelian culture norms such as cattle culture or musical styles would



Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
Yes, thank you for conforming that my attachment works( occasional issues).
I stated it's a reoccurring region in some Aframs's AncestryDNA results ( Mine in particular which is 2nd highest). Look at this topic with the others posting their results: African Ancestry DNA
Np.

Yes, it can be a "reoccurring" region but is it the average? The majority of the AA population has not even been sampled. More importantly individual results are not enough. I can also show you many of examples of AAs showing more Cameroonian ancestry consistently.

Until we get a larger sample size of AAs tracing their ancestries(and I mean via ethnic groups) then its mostly guessing at this point.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharif662 View Post
That's a strong possibility for the reoccurring results from that region and also the Ewe/Mina is the largest group represnted from that region.

Yet the non-Ewa/Mina outsizes it in percentages.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland60426 View Post
That could be it. Yoruba in particular is the second biggest ethnicity in Benin and I think most of them live south or east along the border near Southwest Nigeria, which also has a very large Yoruba population. AncestryDNA is probably allocating Yoruba as "Benin/Togo in the algorithms , and that may explain why Sharif622 and I have estimates of over one-third Benin/Togo, whereas Myheritage has allocated half of my African ancestry to "Nigerian", but still only a small fraction of Sierra Leonean (includes Guinea and Liberia and probably correlates to to my small percentages of Mali or Ghana at Ancestry).
Not only that I remember reading a study saying that African-Americans have a large amount of Yoruba ancestry. Either way AncestryDNA is not really a good indicator for ancestry if you want to look deep. Yes, AncestryDNA is most likely allocating the Yoruba as "Benin/Togo." More importantly AncestryDNA doesn't even have a Sierra Leone, Guinea or Liberia component. And iirc another example of some of AncestryDNA components being mixed up is that the North African component is "mixed" with some non-indignous Arab ancestry which is why some North Africans can score 75% "North African" on AncestryDNA. GEDmatch on the other hand separates this aboriginal NA ancestry. So yea AncestryDNA needs to fix/add some components. Not only that they need to add mtDNA and Y-DNA which would give us even more clues.....
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Old 08-31-2019, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,019 posts, read 4,562,166 times
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My Mother and sister recently did a dna test and it came back that they have some dna from Congo and also a little bit from Mali. Congo didn't surprise me but Mali did surprise me a bit. How common is Mali ancestry in the Americas??
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Old 08-31-2019, 11:05 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
6,982 posts, read 4,362,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
My Mother and sister recently did a dna test and it came back that they have some dna from Congo and also a little bit from Mali. Congo didn't surprise me but Mali did surprise me a bit. How common is Mali ancestry in the Americas??
Senegambia and Mali is very common among Mexicans who get an average of 4%-5% West African. Quite a few slavers were willing to pay more for slaves from this region.
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Old 08-31-2019, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,019 posts, read 4,562,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
Senegambia and Mali is very common among Mexicans who get an average of 4%-5% West African. Quite a few slavers were willing to pay more for slaves from this region.
Interesting stuff. I have to look into it more. Thanks.
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Old 08-31-2019, 01:10 PM
 
5,256 posts, read 4,730,622 times
Reputation: 1607
The trans-Atlantic slave trade was based from what is now Cacheu, south of the Gambia to Angola.

Afrocentrics seem to be ashamed of this & thus resort to revisionist history, now claiming they are not really afrocentric.
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Old 08-31-2019, 02:32 PM
 
136 posts, read 18,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kovert View Post
The trans-Atlantic slave trade was based from what is now Cacheu, south of the Gambia to Angola.

Afrocentrics seem to be ashamed of this & thus resort to revisionist history, now claiming they are not really afrocentric.
What are you even talking about? Everyone knows this...
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Old 08-31-2019, 02:49 PM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
6,982 posts, read 4,362,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Interesting stuff. I have to look into it more. Thanks.
Most likely Mandinka's, Bambara's and Wolofs.
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Old 08-31-2019, 04:23 PM
 
136 posts, read 18,381 times
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@Sharif662 @Chicagoland60426

I found one of the studies I was talking about. This study shows that the main ancestry of AAs are Yoruba followed by Sahelian Mandenka and then Bantu Central African(Congolese).

Quote:
We found that all the African Americans are admixed in the African component of their ancestry, with estimated contributions of 19% West (for example, Mandenka), 63% West Central (for example, Yoruba), and 14% South West Central or Eastern (for example, Bantu speakers), with little variation among individuals. Furthermore, we found little evidence of genetic structure within the African component of ancestry in African Americans, but significant structure related to the proportion of European ancestry. These results are consistent with mating patterns among African Americans that are unrelated to African ancestral origins, cast doubt on the general utility of mtDNA or Y-chromosome markers alone to delineate the full African ancestry of African Americans, and show that the proportion of European ancestry is the leading source of stratification bias in genetic case-control studies of African Americans.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/corecgi...1&s=20&r=1&c=3

The dark red is Yoruba. The orange is Mandenka and the light blue/green is Bantu.

Source:
Characterizing the admixed African ancestry of African Americans


All in all we were all correct. However, only thing that was taboo was significant "Beninese" ancestry in AAs which most likely is "Yoruba." Anyways I was correct about Mandenka/Sahelian ancestry in AAs. Even tho that wasn't my main argument. But scroll down to table 1 in the link/study you'll see that the African ancestries vary from USA regions. Of course different genetic studies vary on ancestry.
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