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Old 11-20-2015, 01:07 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
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I came across these videos which I found interesting the Dr. traced her roots to Cameroon through DNA and wants to reconnect the demeanor of the reporter in Cameroon during the interview I thinks speaks volumes, I think he views her as an American interloper. I don't think that most Africans view African-Americans as African. I actually felt bad for her during the interviews she seems like a nice lady and he behaved like an ass in my opinion.

I have noticed that some African-Americans want to reconnect with their African roots but I don't believe the feeling is mutual with Africans. What do you think? I really think most Africans would prefer African-Americans stay out of Africa.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57S69g0Rb5k





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrVD2u_o8qU
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Old 11-20-2015, 01:12 AM
 
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You are aware that just because one's skin is black it does not mean they are ancestors of Africa right?
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Old 11-20-2015, 01:16 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
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Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
You are aware that just because one's skin is black it does not mean they are ancestors of Africa right?
Yes I am aware that "black skin" isn't exclusive to Africa but I was speaking in the context of the African diaspora as a result of the Atlantic slave trade.
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Old 11-20-2015, 02:08 AM
 
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Technically, black Africans sold other Africans as commodity,so I don't think Africans ever gave a damn about Africans in North America, not from the beginning. Pan Africanism is very much a product of the African American inferiority complex. Africa is a large diverse place, the concept of Pan Africanism is ridiculous.

I spent some time in the US as a child and after I moved back to my native country I was still accepted, I got lectures everyday reminding me that I was not American. I really don't know about Africans, perhaps they don't think blood is important.

Last edited by littlemissrock; 11-20-2015 at 02:17 AM..
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Old 11-20-2015, 03:19 PM
 
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Oh the generalizations First, you can't lump all the countries together or even ethnic groups. Some people care and some don't.

If an African American wants to trace their roots, let them. What's it going to hurt? If they find their roots go back to Yoruba, Ibo or whatever it's their choice to find out.

If members of said 'group' give them the "stank eye" so what! It still doesn't change the fact. Some people are interested and want to know.

I wish the slave trade would have never happened. Then you wouldn't have all of this confusion.

It's just like a white person wanting to know their heritage and getting excited about learning they're German, or Irish. They may want to visit that country and learn more about the people.

Last edited by Chilipepper35; 11-20-2015 at 03:20 PM.. Reason: grammar
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Old 11-20-2015, 06:04 PM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chilipepper35 View Post
Oh the generalizations First, you can't lump all the countries together or even ethnic groups. Some people care and some don't.

If an African American wants to trace their roots, let them. What's it going to hurt? If they find their roots go back to Yoruba, Ibo or whatever it's their choice to find out.

If members of said 'group' give them the "stank eye" so what! It still doesn't change the fact. Some people are interested and want to know.

I wish the slave trade would have never happened. Then you wouldn't have all of this confusion.

It's just like a white person wanting to know their heritage and getting excited about learning they're German, or Irish. They may want to visit that country and learn more about the people.

The Atlantic slave trade was terrible absolutely however had history been different there are millions upon millions of people that would not be alive today. Many individuals are a product of that history even if you only had one African ancestor 500-600 years ago and you're Caucasian or if you're African-American and 20% of your DNA is European.
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Old 11-20-2015, 07:11 PM
 
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Africa was made up of tribes, nations, chiefdoms and kingdoms. This whole country concept is not African.
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Old 11-20-2015, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
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Originally Posted by gumisgood View Post
Africa was made up of tribes, nations, chiefdoms and kingdoms. This whole country concept is not African.
Neither is a Sub-Saharan race or culture but of course that doesn't get talk about as much.
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Old 11-21-2015, 04:34 PM
 
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I got the impression..the guy's attitude was: why are these Americans here? and since you are here, how can you materially benefit us?...I don't understand this "search for identity" stuff you are from America..and if other Cameroonians want to be
involved with this..they can if they want to.

This is the problem with Pan African-ism it was developed in Trinidad during the colonial era when black people were colonized in the world and experiencing racism in white majority societies...At the time, black people all over the globe
had that in common...it failed to take in to account cultural differences that result from different social environments in
which black people were being oppressed..

1. In America where blacks are 12% of the population who are American in culture and nationality...but being black is
made a big issue originally due to historical racism resulting in "search for identity" as a result of discrimination and
social exclusion based on race.

2. In West/Central Africa where it was a racially homogeneous environment people were divided by ethnic group and
language.

So I think in the interviewers eyes "Here an American woman in my country saying she is coming back home" Her being black means little or nothing she is not part of an ethnic group here nor does she speak an ethnic language."

Notice he kept referring to the "Americans" she kept inserting African..She is thinking racially, he is thinking culturally..

The question is how do these academic ideas work on the ground?...in a piratical everyday sense...
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Old 11-22-2015, 11:59 AM
AFP AFP started this thread
 
6,898 posts, read 4,229,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
I got the impression..the guy's attitude was: why are these Americans here? and since you are here, how can you materially benefit us?...I don't understand this "search for identity" stuff you are from America..and if other Cameroonians want to be
involved with this..they can if they want to.

This is the problem with Pan African-ism it was developed in Trinidad during the colonial era when black people were colonized in the world and experiencing racism in white majority societies...At the time, black people all over the globe
had that in common...it failed to take in to account cultural differences that result from different social environments in
which black people were being oppressed..

1. In America where blacks are 12% of the population who are American in culture and nationality...but being black is
made a big issue originally due to historical racism resulting in "search for identity" as a result of discrimination and
social exclusion based on race.

2. In West/Central Africa where it was a racially homogeneous environment people were divided by ethnic group and
language.

So I think in the interviewers eyes "Here an American woman in my country saying she is coming back home" Her being black means little or nothing she is not part of an ethnic group here nor does she speak an ethnic language."

Notice he kept referring to the "Americans" she kept inserting African..She is thinking racially, he is thinking culturally..

The question is how do these academic ideas work on the ground?...in a piratical everyday sense...
I noticed that as well.
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